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November Blog Articles - Page 4 Print E-mail
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Saturday, 06 October 2007 02:06

November 21st, 2007

New York City - City of the Great Pyramids
By admin in mirage.studio.7
A new kid on the block - the 53 West 53rd Street by Jean Nouvel. French architect Jean Nouvel did it again; his latest groundbreaking design for Manhattan will rival the Chrysler Building in height and possibly the old bird’s iconic statues. 53 West 53rd Street by Jean Nouvel is a mixed-use tower, it will contain a hotel, luxury apartments, offices, shops, and restaurant, the restaurant and lounge are below ground level, the idea is to have the pedestrians peering in through the exterior, which is entirely sheathed in glass.

Do Roads Pay for Themselves? No -- But They Could
Erica Barnett in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
The Sightline Institute recently linked to an analysis by the Institute of Transportation Studies that asked a simple question: "Do motor-vehicle users in the US pay their way?" Unsurprisingly, the answer was no. Between highway spending, transportation bonds, police and ambulance services, legal and judicial costs related to driving, and the military costs of maintaining a steady supply of Middle Eastern oil, the taxes paid by drivers fall far short of the public spending needed to support driving....

INTERVIEW: Mark Wigley on Greening Architecture Academia
By Jill in Inhabitat

Buildings account for almost half (48%) of all greenhouse-gas emissions annually.
This oft-repeated statistic highlights what many architects and designers have long realized: The building industry has a profound impact on the state of our environment. In the past couple of years, “green building” has become trendy, led by a combination of concerned professionals, consumer demand, and opportunistic developers looking to distinguish their properties from the competition in a challenging real-estate market. But is environmental awareness really making enough inroads into the curriculum of design schools, in the places where it could potentially have the most impact on the future of the industry?

small, cool prefabs: a floating home/office and a retreat, aero 11 design
By Justin in materialicious
A couple of years ago I ran across the Airship Series of prefabs from Aero 11 Design on MocoLoco, and while the “Home” design is cool, my head was turned by the other two designs offered by the firm: the “Office” and the “Retreat”. I seem to recall seeing the floating home/office on the last page of Dwell magazine a few years back….? Whatever. These are awesome.

Zero-Emission Research Station in Antarctica

By Jorge in Inhabitat
If there is one place on our planet that can be said to be relatively free from human impact, that would probably be the Antarctic continent. With this in mind, the government of Belgium commissioned the International Polar Foundation to design and operate a new research station, the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica. The goal? To make it the first zero-emission station in the world.

Ouroussoff's Rough Day: Reviewing the NY Times' New Building
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
A really fun story over at Editor & Publisher about the difficulties faced by NY Times architecture critic, Niccolai Ouroussoff, when it came time yesterday to review the paper's new building. As he says, he was caught between a rock and a hard place...

Future Snow
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Every time the doors opened tonight on the tram ride home, an amazingly crisp and cold autumn air breathed into the cabin – and it smelled like snow, though no snow was in sight, and so I found myself thinking the two following things:
1) Weather control is the future of urban design.
2) If a city wants to attract new residents it should try scenting the snow.

November 19th, 2007

National Geographic's Maps: Tools for Adventure @ the Museum of Science and Industry
By Brendan in Where
If you typed the word "maps" into Google and then visited the first ten sites on the results page, you might get a good idea of what it feels like to walk through the Museum of Science and Industry's exhibit National Geographic's Maps: Tools for Adventure, which is part of the citywide Festival of Maps. That is to say: a nuanced overview of mapping technology, this is not. While the exhibit is kid-friendly, it tries a bit too hard to go after the attention deficit demographic. Thematically, the "tools for adventure" theme is the loose string that sort of ties things somewhat together, almost. In fact, between this, the City of the Future exhibit earlier this year, and the Christmas Around the World disaster that we'll discuss in a minute, I'm beginning to wonder if, perhaps, this legendary museum is just coasting on its historical reputation these days.

From the Last 50 in 150
By Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
At last week's Pecha Kucha night at the Ace Hotel Cleaners, I got talking with a local architect about today's new crop of buildings and the long-term outlook there will be for this era's architecture. He posed to me something along these lines: "I'm not sure if any of the buildings here from the last 50 years will still be here in 150 years." There's a lot of ways you could look at such a statement. Maybe it means that with green building and global warming taking off, in a century and a half so much will have changed about the physical, thermal and electrical aspects of architecture that there won't be a place for many of today's works to endure. Maybe it means that only the most exceptional buildings from the past survive for a century or more, because to go through the extra headaches and cost of preserving and restoring them, they have to resonate enough to be really worth it. Or, maybe it's just a cynical way of saying nothing we've built in Portland in the last half-century (since about 1957 if you're playing at home) is significant enough architecturally to merit being preserved.

Farm houses: the new style, by neill heath
By Justin in materialicious
The house on the cover of this beautiful book is The Freeman House, by Wayne Branum and Meghan Kell Cornell.

Boogie Fever
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
You may not know it, but you've probably seen the work of the Serbian-born, Brooklyn-based photographer known simply as...

Modern Farmhouse
By John Commoner in FUTURE HOUSE NOW
Modern farmhouse sounds like an oxymoron, but I've seen more than a few great looking modernist takes on the American homestead. One of my favorites is Farmhouse One, by the architecture firm of Durkee, Brown, Viveiros and Werenfels. It's a simple, traditionally inspired Rhode Island farmhouse with modern twists. Take a look. And if you're in to modern farmhouses you'll also be pleased to know there's a great blog dedicated to the genre - the appropriately named Farmhouse Modern. It's definitely worth a look (I found it on the LiveModern Blog Directory, where Future House Now is also listed).

Jetson Green: Wis Tavern
By architecture.MNP
Philip Proefrock, contributor over at Jetson Green writes:
The first Gold certified LEED-H home in Illinois is built from the renovation of an old neighborhood tavern. The 3,800 square foot building is used by the owners as both a residence and as the offices of their company: Smog Veil Records. The label has adopted an “eco-friendly” set of principles, and the owners felt their home/office ought to reflect those values as well. Daylighting, recycled materials, and efficient appliances were all part of this project. Inside, some of the floors are made of a terrazzo made from recycled glass and chunks of old vinyl records.

The Snow Queen’s railway
By Jotis Moore in Zaha Hadid Blog
Zaha Hadid’s mountain railway launches next month. The Nordpark Cable Railway follows Hadid’s ski jump in this tailormade landscape for her melodramatic architecture. Ripping across the Austrian Alps like a rollercoast

Nouvel Khan, Tatlin garnish
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
As a Chicagoan born and bred, it's impossible to look at Jean Nouvel's stunning new 53 West 53rd, a 75-story hotel/condo tower to be erected next to the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan, without thinking of its early precedents: the diagonal-braced tube skyscrapers of the great engineer Fazlur Khan, most especially the iconic John Hancock Building on North Michigan avenue, designed at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in collaboration with architect Bruce Graham. Separated by four decades, the two towers offer up cogent and contrasting expressions of their respective era's. Read all about it, and see the pictures, here.  Read more…
Rich Silverstein Visually Blogs for HuffPo and You Get to Critique Him...



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