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Saturday, 06 October 2007 02:06

November 16th, 2007

Sustainable design has come of age.
By Jennifer Johnson -  November 2007

There was a time when green buildings facilities that incorporated elements to improve energy efficiency, reduce material waste and make a lighter footprint on the surrounding environment were seen by the industry as trendy, risky and unnecessarily expensive. But those days are gone...

architecture roundup, november 16
By Justin in materialicious
Casa de Invitados (Guest House), Licancheu, Chile. Straw bales, corrugated polycarbonate and zinc cladding, green roof. Very cool. AATA ARQUITECTOS via Plataforma Arquitectura
T-Bone House, Waiblingen, Germany. Is being in love with a car normal? COAST architecture via Wallpaper Magazine
Villa Deys, Rhenen, The Netherlands. Architectenbureau Paul de Ruiter via Modern Residential Design
House Alta, Älta, Sweden. Johannes Norlander Arkitektur via David Report blog
Casa Suntro, Morelos, Mexico. Jorge Hernandez de la Garza, Arquitecto
Shenandoah Retreat, North Fork of the Shenandoah River, Virginia. Carter Burden Architecture

Work Life Balance. From an Architects Perspective. (I).
By Christoph, anArchitecture in anArchitecture
Generally, in architectural practises, office hours get stretched a little bit. Not only for junior ranks or interns during peak periods – it’s common. You know - architectural practices have a lot of hour-sucking work. Funny enough, architects are often proud of that. Being surrounded mostly by colleagues younger than thirty might be a good indicator for an office with a bad work life balance policy. People tend to leave these kind of places when they get older and switch to a firm that reflects their demands for life: spend time with family and kids, develop new interests, learning a language, charity work, ...

SHAPE-SHIFTING CHAIR: Caterpillar by Anna Bullus
By Tylene in Inhabitat
We love designers who get their inspiration from the unexpected, and we love transforming, 2-for-1 furniture even more! Check out the Caterpillar, a flexible piece of furniture inspired by bicycle chains. Why settle for just one position, when Anna Bullus’s Caterpillar lounge chair can be maneuvered into at least 14 different positions. With such flexibility, its easy to find a position that fits your comfort.

The Lighter Side of 18th-Century French Interiors

By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 2:05 PM
Newly renovated galleries at The Frick Collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art show off 18th-century French artworks and objects...

WEEKEND READING: November 10-November 16, 2007 (Guest Post by Colin Kloecker)
By Colin in Where
Hi, I'm Colin and I usually cover the intersection of humanitarian issues, sustainability, and the built environment over at Blog Like You Give A Damn. But this month you'll find me here, curating Where's Weekend Reading segment. Five Items of interest for you this week. ITEM ONE: I've been saying it for years: Skyways suck the vitality out of our city streets, "we should tear them all down". Living in Minneapolis/St. Paul I often get blank or bewildered stares when I tell people this (which I probably do far too often), but I feel my argument has been bolstered now that top urban designers Jan Gehl and Gil Penalosa have come out and expressed a similar sentiment....

Ciao, Tokyo: Armani's Ginza Tower
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Call him Armani-San. Fashion designer Giorgio Armani has just unveiled his company's new flagship store in Tokyo's Ginza district. Designed...

Download, Read, and Comment on the Sustainable Sites Initiative Preliminary Report

By ASLA.org - The Dirt
This is a reminder that we are still in the 45-day open comment period for the Sustainable Sites Initiative preliminary report. Featuring over 200 recommendations for designing and building sustainable landscapes, the report is part of the Sustainable Sites Initiative, a partnership between ASLA, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas at Austin and the United States Botanic Garden to create voluntary guidelines and a rating system for sustainable landscape design. The 107-page preliminary report is available for download here and is filled with different strategies to help make sustainable choices for landscapes. So far the report has garnered strong interest and the sustainablesites.org website has seen a large bump in traffic since the report was announced. You are invited to give feedback on this report; comments are due no later than January 11, 2008. Save a tree and read the report online in pdf form!...

Nouvel Note
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Just a quick note on Jean Nouvel's latest design for Manhattan, a new 75-story tower for a site next to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in Midtown. Nicolai Ouroussoff asks, "How did a profit-driven developer become more adventurous architecturally than MoMA, which has tended to make cautious choices in recent years?" He answers his own question in with: Hines [who MoMA sold the site to] asked Mr. Nouvel to come up with two possible designs for the site. A decade ago anyone who was about to invest hundreds of millions on a building would inevitably have chosen the more conservative of the two. But times have changed. Architecture is a form of marketing now, and Hines made the bolder choice.

Today's archidose #155
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
IIT Entry Across, originally uploaded by ken mccown. The McCormick Tribune Campus Center at the Illinois Institute (IIT) of Technology by Rem Koolhaas/OMA. Be sure to check out Ken McCown's flickr set for more quality pics of the IIT building.

Why OMA is OMA and UnStudio Isn't Just Studio: How Firms Got Their Names
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Witold Rybczynski over at Slate has sought to answer a question we've sat and wondered about: "Building a Brand:...

Architectural graphics
By Crompton in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
The style of this beautiful book, with a shadow font above a slender serif font, all in red white and black with a hessian spine, is strongly reminiscent of the Architectural Review of the time.(Stevenage Development Corporation, 1950)

PREFAB FRIDAY: Office of Mobile Design’s Country School
By Emily in Inhabitat
Aaah to be a kid again- the carefree days, the lack of financial responsibility, and awesome prefab school environments like the Country School designed by Jennifer Siegal. The Los Angeles middle school expansion project opens next months to some very lucky kids who will enjoy classrooms filled with light, open learning spaces, and the best and healthiest materials. We’re big fans of Jennifer and her Office of Mobile Design here at Inhabitat, and we’re thrilled that her great prefab designs are being successfully applied to educational contexts- what better way to learn and teach than in a wonderful healthy classroom?

Putti Gone Wild

By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Via the indefatigable Joan Pomaranc comes word that an antique bronze clock and matching candelabra owned by the late theater historian Joseph DuciBella will be put up for auction on Sunday, November 25th by Elgin's Bunte Auction. DuciBella, who died this past June, had rescued the ensemble from the Magnolia Street side of the lobby of the Uptown Theater, the grand, 1926 4000-seat Chicago movie palace that has been shuttered since 1981. (Chicago Inside is again reporting that no less than two national promoters - Jam Productions and Live Nation - are interested in rescuing the severely decayed landmark from its long slumber.)...

November 15th, 2007

(Half) Billion Dollar Baby
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
In still another milestone in the city's growing TIF scandal, Crain's Chicago Business reported today that Cook County Clerk David Orr estimates that for the new tax year, the amount of money diverted into Chicago's TIF districts will cross the half-billion dollar mark, to $500.4 million, 29% more than just the year before, and triple the amount diverted just five years ago. At this rate, the amount of money diverted into TIF's may soon eclipse undiverted revenues - $820 million in 2008.

Win A Subscription to dwell
By architecture.MNP
That’s right my ninjas - we here at MNP are giving away a subscription to dwell [I believe that’s 10 issues over 12 months] to one of our readers. How do you get in on this, you ask? It’s simple - every visitor who leaves a comment [a content-related comment, not just ‘first!’ or something foolish] on ANY MNP SITE, along with their email address will be entered. The ninjas will then select a commenter at random, and name the winner on Novermber 26th. Every individual comment counts [the more you comment, the more likely you are to win] so visit all of our sites and let your voice be heard....

The Carbon Footprint of That Glass of Vino
By Emily Gertz in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
So -- you're an average, eco-conscious resident of the Boston-to-Washington megacity corridor, and you're worried about food miles: the distance your edibles are transported in greenhouse gas-belching glory to arrive on your plate. You act by ignoring the pile of New Zealand Gala apples at the greengrocer in favor of locally grown Macintoshes, and buying rounds of artisanal Vermont blue at the weekly greenmarket instead of bricks of mystery cheddar at the supermarket....

Henry Liu's Green Fly-Ash Bricks
By Ugo Okafor in African Architecture and Design
The National Science Foundation website says "...Researchers have found that bricks made from fly ash--fine ash particles captured as waste by coal-fired power plants--may be even safer than predicted. Instead of leaching minute amounts of mercury as some researchers had predicted,the bricks apparently do the reverse, pulling minute amounts of the toxic metal out of ambient air. Each year, roughly 25 million tons of fly ash from coal-fired power plants are recycled, generally as additives in building materials such as concrete, but 45 million tons go to waste. Fly ash bricks both find a use for some of that waste and counter the environmental impact from the manufacture of standard bricks.

visual inspiration: stock surfaces, by judy juracek
By Justin in materialicious
STOCK SURFACES is a resource for architectural, decorative, botanical, and landscape photographs. This site also provides a way to explore and preview Judy Juracek’s series of visual research books: SURFACES, SOFT SURFACES, NATURAL SURFACES and ARCHITECTURAL SURFACES.
The SURFACES books are compact picture libraries of images of man-made and natural surfaces, organized specifically for artists, architects, designers, illustrators, and picture editors. Some of the photographs are detailed views shot for the purpose of showing specific materials, layouts, weaves, patterns, textures, and architectural details...
STOCK SURFACES

Keep Off the Grass: Succulents Don't Suck
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 3:39 PM
As green roofs proliferate, landscape architects have had to consider what best to green them with. So far, the green roof resident of choice seems to be members of the ultra-resilient sedum family. The super drought-tolerant, adorably sculptural succulents are really the perfect plant...

MARTINO GAMPER: 100 Chairs in 100 Days
By Ariana in Inhabitat
Martino Gamper has a penchant for furniture: to be specific, chairs. In his project 100 Chairs in 100 Days, he takes apart a mix of discarded and systematically collected pieces found on London’s street corners (or sympathetic friends’ lounges and living rooms) over a period of two years, disassembles and then reworks them, creating unique, functional chairs that blend the “stylistic and structural elements of the found ones.”

Can G-E and GBD Make M&F another WK?
By Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
A few weeks ago Portland's most prolific central city developer, Gerding-Edlen, announced they have purchased the old Meier & Frank warehouse in the Pearl District. Instead of condominiums or luxury apartments, which have comprised most Pearl projects, this one will have offices. Unsurprisingly but still impressively, Gerding-Edlen and their usual design collaborator, GBD Architects, have announced that the project will be targeted to earn the top 'Platinum' LEED rating from the US Green Buidling Council. That will mean things like solar panels, a green roof, and toilets flushed with rainwater. I'm guessing there will also be a very large atrium in the middle to flood the interior space with natural light...

three houses by olavi koponen
Justin in materialicious
Okay, I think I’ll just pack right now, and move to Finland. Olli Koponen’s houses are fantastic. Sure, the first one, Kotilo, is rather spectacular, but the other two are a terrific study in green building. Koponen, describing Villa Långbo, says: “All materials can be recycled, main material timber is local, construction was manual, a part of construction materials have been transported wintertime by horses and nature has been tampered as little as possible.”...

DUBIOTECH: New Largest Green Building in Dubai
By Mahesh in Inhabitat
The new headquarters of Dubiotech (in Dubai, of course! We do love our puns…), is set to be one of the world’s largest green buildings. The LEED certified 22-story headquarters and laboratory buildings will be home to the center of excellence for biotechnology education and research, with two connected buildings oriented to maximize day-lighting and views while minimizing solar gain. It will also integrate a 500,000 sq ft animal reserve for indigenous conservation and wildlife protection.The design comes form design firm CUH2A, and is scheduled for completion in 2009.

Chicago Streetscenes - Bridgework, Towards the Light

By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS

Literary Dose #18
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
"Reduction is always risky, but [Alvaro] Siza's observations [on his working process] could be simplified in this manner: place: origin of all architecture."



Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 June 2008 01:48
 
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