November Blog Articles Print
Saturday, 06 October 2007 02:06

November Blog Articles

November 30th, 2007

Japan for Sustainability
Balaton Group in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
By Junko Edahiro With the ultimate aim of helping to create a sustainable society, I lecture and write in Japan, and I also translate into Japanese the latest information as well key messages from around the world. I have been honored to have had the opportunity to bring to Japan the words and writings of the environmental academic Lester Brown, Dennis Meadows, for example, and also to translate Mr. Al Gore's book, "An Inconvenient Truth." ....

MNP Reviews: Opportunistic Architecture
By architecture.MNP
Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis: Opportunistic Architecture, by Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki + David J. Lewis [2007]. Opportunistic Architecture admits in it’s opening sentence that the term ‘opportunistic’ typically has negative connotations - ‘referring to the seizing of any circumstances regardless of principles or ethics’. But how is one opportunistic when designing a building? LTL [Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis] argue that their particular approach to design - utilizing all the limits, constraints and restrictions typically associated with architectural projects [budget, site conditions, code/zongin, etc] as a positive driving force in their work - is an example of ‘opportunistic architecture’ at work.

Living Lightly Among the Trees in Australia
Ali in Inhabitat
Australia-based architects Steven Isaacs and Lisa Saville have turned a challenging building site into an environmentally sensitive sanctuary among the trees. Located just outside Sydney, the couple’s stunning abode is a lofty duplex built around the existing nature with an ultra-light footprint - an example of how thoughtful design can translate into stylish, sustainable living.

BIG: Danish Maritime Museum
architecture.MNP
An MNP favorite, BIG [the Bjarke Ingels Group], has recently won a competition [by unanimous decision, even though they apparently didn’t adhere to the design brief - ninjas in true form] to design the Danish Maritime Museum in Helsingør, DK. While searching for an appropriate site for the proposed project, the firm discovered an abandoned 150m long, 25m wide, and 9m deep concrete dry dock within eyesight of Kronborg Castle [setting of Shakespeare’s Hamlet], as shown in the diagram below.

PREFAB FRIDAY: Loq Kit Sustainable Housing System
Ali in Inhabitat
Modular design shines in Loq•kit - an innovative, interchangeable idea of home from architect Patrick Freet. This proposed building system utilizes snap-lock components to create walls, infill, and envelope that are adaptable and affordable. Intended for easy assembly that can be customized and changed, Loq•kit technology makes building and remodeling a snap, literally!

November 29th, 2007


Treasure Island: A Regenerative Urban Ecology
Brendan in Where
Next Monday, once my NaNoWriMo adventure is over, regular posting will resume at Where. I'm excited to offer a little preview, today, of what's coming. I recently had the opportunity to interview Craig W. Hartmann, FAIA, Design Partner at Skidmore Owings and Merill's San Francisco office, about the firm's plan for the redevelopment of Treasure Island (which Where covered this past summer). Today's post is a preface to that interview...a teaser, if you will.

the aalto house, aino and alvar aalto

Justin in materialicious
The Aalto House, Helsinki, Finland. Built: 1935-36. This was the home of Hugo Alvar Henrik Aalto and his wife, Aino Marsio-Aalto. Mrs. Aalto played a significant role in the design of this house, and contributed to many other projects as well. We wanted to make the best use in a private house of natural lighting, the orientation of the terraces and the different rooms, shelters from the wind and so on, so because of our climate, we were obliged to adopt a complex solution with a lot of external walls. This required more thorough investigation of the insulating properties of the external walls…

Literary Dose #20
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
"It is here [Baja California], in the Bay of Loreto, where developers are building a 5,000-unit resort designed by Andreas Duany, who is selling it to the world as 'the first ecologically friendly subdivision.' In a typical New Urbanist appeal, this mega development (PDF link) is customized by an authentic Mexican Village, completing the invasion of Loreto Bay by no only mono culture of upper-middle-class North American land owners who can afford this island of pleasure, but by 'Seaside' and 'Celebration' type of planning, making this the official arrival of New Urbanism in grand scale to the Mexican West Coast. ...

PICTURING GLOBAL WARMING: Greenpeace’s Photoclima
Abigail in Inhabitat
Photoclima, a new photography book project produced by Greenpeace Spain, is a call to action for countries globally to examine and address the impact of global warming and climate change both locally and internationally. Photoclima features the eye-opening photographs of Pedro Armestre and Mario Gómez as a means to highlight the varied topography and rich landscape of Spain’s agricultural, coastal resort, and national park ecosystems. The beauty of the book’s images is subverted by a series of before and after photomontage shots of regions that might be impacted by catastrophic environmental alterations...

November 28th, 2007

Wave Tower
architecture.MNP
Dubai. What can I even say - the place is crazy. I can recall a time not too long ago, when I was still in school, where insane ‘object’ buildings were mostly designed by the ’starchitects’ and were typically institutional [museums, concert halls, etc] projects. No more. Dubai is an architecture student’s dream-come-true. There are no rules, just design something crazy and those ninjas will probably build it, so long as its different enough. Don’t worry about context, as there is no more vernacular architecture [well, there is actually - individualism and elaborate form-making are the vernacular]. Just one-up the other guy, and your project can get built...

Squatter Imaginaries

Bryan Finoki in Subtopia
One of the most intriguing facets of Dionisio Gonzalez's photographic constructions is that they immediately question the viewer's knowledge of what a "slum" actually looks like and what are the political forces that shape slums. To that end, he asks us if "slum" is even an appropriate term at all. Viewers less familiar with these spaces may not detect the careful nuances of his work and instead simply digest these as neither appropriate nor inappropriate images of global poverty, but rather as ones that are simply real. In my opinion, what is most important about any work of art is the actual effect it will have on culture and public perception. In this case, we are forced to ask what messages about squatter communities are being transmitted through these images? ...

The Wright Way to Build a Gingerbread House

mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 2:15 PM
Frank Lloyd Wright experimented with many materials for his Usonian houses, created to be well-designed, low-cost dwellings that the average...

earthbag building: the sun house in haiti

Justin in materialicious
I am an avid reader of Kelly Hart’s blog, Green Home Building and Sustainable Architecture, and recently he started a separate site called Earthbag Building which I am hugely interested in (as some of you may have noticed already  ). I just ran across a recent project, The Sun House ( Kay Sole in Creole), built in Haiti, which appeals to me for several reasons: 1. The walls are fabricated from poly bags which carried bulk diet staples such as wheat, rice and barley, and rather than being disposed of, filled with earth become free building materials. 2. Haiti is desperate for safe and sound housing, and given that Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, why not utilize a free commodity?...

PSU Student Reviews on Display
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Beginning today at the Unitus Building (2121 SW Fourth Avenue) and continuing through December 5, Portland State University's Department of Architecture will begin public displays and final reviews of student design studio work from the fall 2007 term. First up at 5:30 today is professor Garrett Martin's class, "Edge and Flow". Isn't that the movie about the pimp-turned-rapper? (Just kidding; that's Hustle and Flow) Incidentally, many of these classes seem to have somewhat abstract names. Tomorrow brings professor John Froning's class, "Residual Understanding". (Maybe it has to do with GOP politics.) Friday is professor Jeff Schnabel's class, "Anonymous Remains" (what I'd like the Ducks to make out of the Beavers this weekend). Also on Friday is Matt Janssen's class, "Housing the Masses". This one will be held at the offices of Ankrom Moisan Associated Architects, which, considering the class title, seems appropriate.

Designing with computer science.
Young in Architecture
It was during my school time that a professor came to our school and demonstrated architectural design through computer science. And each of his book's front page has different design. We are getting nearer to a technology science dependant world. Hopefully I can cope up with the development later in life. "Evolutionary algorithms are computational techniques widely used to solve difficult optimization problems. Evolutionary algorithms search for the best solutions by starting with a random population of solutions and iteratively subjecting that population to selection pressures that cause it to evolve. Solutions that fit better with the selection pressures live and breed, while solutions that fit poorly are eliminated from the population. After a number of evolution cycles, the population converges, revealing the best, most fit solutions. "

The Origins of Pattern Theory, the Future of the Theory And The Generation of a Living World
Young in Architecture
"(A) Pattern Theory. I'm going to talk first of all about patterns and pattern languages, what I did about that, a few little points about problems we encountered, why we did it, how we did it, and so forth. That is a historical survey referring back to the late 60s and early 70s.
(B) The Nature of Order. Then, I'm going to summarize the theoretical framework which has evolved out of the pattern work: a framework which is about to be published in a series of four books collectively called The Nature Of Order, four books that will be put out by Oxford University Press in the year 2000....

A Suburban Future?
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Much of my time over the Thanksgiving break was spent helping my parents pack their belongings to move out of the home in which they raised me and my sister. Located about 20 miles north of Chicago, the house is in what could be called an old suburb, with a gridded street pattern, small lots, and walking distance to shops, library, and a train station to Chicago. Regardless of this condition, the McMansion phenomenon is still to be found in the area, though more likely on the large blocks of adjacent streets with larger lots than this street and its smaller lots, where new houses -- between the size of the old ranches or colonials and the trendy McMansions -- crowd their lots and leave very little yard space. Well, looking out the back of my parent's house I noticed one possible scenario for achieving large houses on small lots...

Eye Candy: Alexandre Farto
architecture.MNP
This week’s eye candy comes to you from Alexandre Farto, AKA Vhils, an artist that I unfortunately know nothing about - other than he’s ill. I don’t know the names of the individual works shown, but all are part of his Building3Steps project, and the images below are all photos of one installation [a photo of each side of the installation space, and a detail]. In particular I’m really feelin’ the whole ‘the city has roots’ thing, and the color contrast between above/below ground. Pretty siiick. Check out his website for more....

Amazon's Kindle: Scoble Offers...um...Design Critiques?
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Now that we're a week out, there's not been much love being shown toward Amazon's Kindle. LAist just put...

Star Wars-Inspired Marine Research Facility
Evelyn in Inhabitat
Star Wars inspiration and biomimicry combine for the design of the Facility at Sea, a sustainable marine research platform and feat of offshore building engineering. The concept came together in an architecture studio at the University of Texas, which evaluated potential applications of the soaring structural designs of Star Wars for a marine research facility. Designer Jason Mellard took further inspiration from the engineering acumen of Santiago Calatrava and present-day offshore oil platforms.


November 27th, 2007

Building Equity Into Green Homes
Patrick Rollens in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Yesterday, 9:11 PM
Residential home ownership is in a state of extreme flux right now. The mortgage industry is in shambles, and the fallout is reverberating through the U.S. financial markets. In the ensuing chaos, people are starting to question the age-old idea of home ownership as the ultimate goal for a family....

Callebaut Architectures: French Anti-Smog
architecture.MNP
Some of you may remember a series of posts [listed below] we featured here on Vincent Callebaut Architectures back in March of 2007, where we covered a number of the young designer’s projects - showcasing his incredible renderings and unique/individual architectural aesthetic. We here at MNP recently received an email from Vincent Callebaut informing us that his site has been updated - and linking to the most recent project: ANTI-SMOG [An Innovation Centre in Sustainable Development in Paris].

NYT: In Miles of Alleys, Chicago Finds Its Next Environmental Frontier
ASLA.org - The Dirt
Yesterday's New York Times article on the Green Alley project in Chicago is fascinating. With nearly 2,000 miles of alleys in the city, Chicago is moving to porous concrete and asphalt for repaving. From the article:
In a green alley, water is allowed to penetrate the soil through the pavement itself, which consists of the relatively new but little-used technology of permeable concrete or porous asphalt. Then the water, filtered through stone beds under the permeable surface layer, recharges the underground water table instead of ending up as polluted runoff in rivers and streams.

Rotten Pavilions.
Christoph, anArchitecture in anArchitecture
Zaha Hadid, Weil am Rhein, originally posted by "A Daily Dose of Architecture" - if this is the building now..., uploaded by thegoatisbad.

modrocks tile by modwalls
Justin in materialicious
ModRocks Recycled Glass Pebbles: 100% Recycled Clear Glass Pebble Tile
Consumer bottles are crushed into small pieces, tumbled and then mesh mounted onto 12″ by 12″ interlocking sheets. These are 100% recycled glass, and since there is no melting involved, very little energy is used in the production process. The clear color plays well with whatever light source is available, and they pick up grout and surrounding colors beautifully. The example shown is grouted with pure white grout. Ideal for wet and dry areas both indoor and outdoor including floors, pools and spas.

79 million trees
architecture.MNP
http://www.myninjaplease.com/green/?p=898
Indonesia plans on planting 79 million new trees…all in one day! MYNINJAPLEASE! It’s being reported that each of the 71,000 individual villages, plus some 8,000 other administrative areas of the country, have each been ordered to plant 1,000 trees to meet Indonesia’s planting goal…

Grow a House with Terreform
architecture.MNP
I recently came across the video of Mitchell Joachim speaking at POSTOPOLIS, discussing his work on the Terreform project. I had already watched the majority of the POSTOPOLIS videos [including this one], but at the time we were unable to embed videos here at MNP - but no longer! After watching Mitchell describing the project and its implications again, I couldn’t help but throw the video up here for this week’s Green Tuesday. Enjoy!

Looking at Sellwood Bridge Prototypes
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Multnomah County has, on its Sellwood Bridge website, unveiled six prototypes for a replacement span. “Depending on the type of bridge that is chosen,” the website explains, “a replacement Sellwood Bridge could blend with or completely redefine the landscape of Portland’s south Willamette River area.” I couldn't tell you which of those is more important; is it naive to think it could be both?

Exploring Forgotten Chicago

Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Despite Blogger.com's best efforts, including those annoying word verification fields (which I never seem able to get right at first attempt), spam still occasionally makes it through to the comments area of my blog - unrelated plugs for resorts, remedies for mold and, increasingly, invitations to websites written in Chinese that seem to be pitching vendors for various types of equipment. A recent Chinese language spam lists the word "reactor" over a dozen times - I can only hope they don't mean nuclear. As I soon as I find any of these spam listings, I delete them.

Study in Mass
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
I've mentioned architect Minsuk Cho, of Mass Studies, on BLDGBLOG before: he designed the so-called "ring dome" for the Storefront for Art and Architecture's Z-A event last month in New York City, and he collaborated with Jeffrey Inaba's SCI-FI studio to propose an "urban district above the water" in Seoul.
I'd say that Mass Studies is hard to beat for sheer spatial interest and originality; witness their Torque House, Pixel House, or Cheongam Media Headquarters, for instance – let alone the famously freaky Seoul Commune 2026.

November 26th, 2007


27November2007 LAM examination
Young in Architecture
After graduation from Tongji University 6 years ago, I got another examination today. LAM(Lembaga Architect Malaysia) will exam my school syllabus and work. However, only the last semester's work during school time is submitted. The others are just the one you can see in my my profile and other working experience I got from other firms and practices. After 5years of graduation, only now I am submitting my part I/II...

Chronicle Books Treats UnBeige Like Family
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 6:02 PM
Our favorite purveyor of all things bound, Chronicle Books has its Friends & Family Holiday Sale running now through...

Connectivity Wherewithal (Guest Post by Jim Russell)
Brendan in Where
Where is Pittsburgh? Capturing the essence of a place is not easy. Manufacturing a place may be impossible. But the location of a place is relatively straightforward, yes? I'm here to tell you that where Pittsburgh is might surprise you.

China's Air Quality and the Olympics
Mara Hvistendahl in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
As an amateur runner in Shanghai's half-marathon on Sunday, I wasn't overly concerned with my time. But what was I doing to my lungs? There's reason to worry: In August, International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge warned that endurance events at next summer's Beijing Olympics might have to be postponed because of air pollution.

PNCA vs. Public Market and the Emergence of NW Broadway
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
It's really a shame: the 511 Building on Northwest Broadway, ideally situated just a few blocks north of Downtown between the Pearl District and Old Town, has undergone a tug of war between two very worthy candidates. First the Portland Public Market somewhat abruptly went for the striking Italian Renaissance structure, abandoning its previous plan to target Union Station.

More on John Silber's 'Absurd'ity
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
A little more oon John Silber's much talked about new book Architecture of the Absurd, which you might recall us talking about the other day. This time, its a review from The Wall Street Journal (so you know it's a legit opinion or something)....

Algae Hydrogen Balloon Fuel by 20/2 Collaborative
Ali in Inhabitat
While the hydrogen fuel cell might not be viable for commercial vehicles for years, here’s some hope for the promising element. A group of Philadelphia-based creatives known as the 20/2 Collaborative have designed a unique concept that enables on-site production and distribution of biologically produced hydrogen fuel for vehicles....


November 25th, 2007

Architecture by Accident
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Last winter The New York Times reported on a surprising growth industry in the United States: the physical relocation of old houses.
This is the somewhat surreal activity of transporting entire, intact buildings from one place to another, often over more than one hundred miles....

Mobile Minimalism
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Flavio Galvagni of Lab Zero has pointed out a few of his projects that I think deserve mention here.
Let me say right away, though, that I know a lot of people are tired of shipping container architecture – in fact, I think most people are tired of shipping container architecture – yet I have a fairly limitless patience for this sort of thing. Actually, I love shipping container architecture. But the same questions inevitably arise whenever things like this re-appear in the blogosphere: Are shipping containers comfortable? Is reusing them as a form of readymade architecture even structurally realistic? Would anyone really want to raise a family inside one of these things? And does the appeal of such designs actually cross cultures and income levels and ethnicities and, more important, climates? Sure, these might work in Santa Monica – but would they work in Minneapolis-St. Paul?...

November 23rd, 2007

Great Indoors Awards Pictorial Recap
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
We were going to report a little about the winners of the recent Great Indoors Awards, but sadly, their...

The Trick of Finding the Right Olympic Wardrobe for China as a Whole
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Another bit of fun for a slow day, this time out of China. The China Daily is reporting on...

PREFAB FRIDAY: Construisons Demain Green Prefab
By Ali in Inhabitat
French designers continue to put the “fab” in prefab: Construisons Demain, a brilliant design from architect Eric Wuilmot, premiered at Batimat in Paris earlier this month. The system showcases low-energy living with three prefabricated wooden modules, resource and energy efficient systems, healthy finish materials, and inviting living spaces.

BUCHMANN GALERIE BERLIN, Abu Dhabi
By Jotis Moore in Zaha Hadid Blog
Abu Dhabi Performing Arts Centre, 2007 90 x 200 cm. Water base automotive paint and ink on to gelatine and chrome-polyester, mounted on DIBOND. Images from the Buchmann Galerie in Berlin which has been displaying some of Zaha Hadid’s new work. Buchmann Galerie...

Like It or Not, The Guggenheim is Going Gray
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Following up on a post from a couple of months ago, we thought we'd put your sweet mind at ease by letting you know the news that the Guggenheim in NY has finally decided to stay light gray when the restorations are finished. While Frank Lloyd Wright might be rolling in his grave right now, planning an attack by his army of the undead, because we haven't returned to his light yellow...

The Role of the Humanities in Design Creativity
By Aventinus in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
Eamonn Canniffe recently participated in the above titled conference at the the University of Lincoln, hosted by Professor Nicholas Temple. Keynote speakers included Karsten Harries, Professor of Philosophy at Yale University and author of “The Ethical Function of Architecture”, Dalibor Vesely...


November 21st, 2007

New York City - City of the Great Pyramids
By admin in mirage.studio.7
A new kid on the block - the 53 West 53rd Street by Jean Nouvel. French architect Jean Nouvel did it again; his latest groundbreaking design for Manhattan will rival the Chrysler Building in height and possibly the old bird’s iconic statues. 53 West 53rd Street by Jean Nouvel is a mixed-use tower, it will contain a hotel, luxury apartments, offices, shops, and restaurant, the restaurant and lounge are below ground level, the idea is to have the pedestrians peering in through the exterior, which is entirely sheathed in glass.

Do Roads Pay for Themselves? No -- But They Could
Erica Barnett in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
The Sightline Institute recently linked to an analysis by the Institute of Transportation Studies that asked a simple question: "Do motor-vehicle users in the US pay their way?" Unsurprisingly, the answer was no. Between highway spending, transportation bonds, police and ambulance services, legal and judicial costs related to driving, and the military costs of maintaining a steady supply of Middle Eastern oil, the taxes paid by drivers fall far short of the public spending needed to support driving....

INTERVIEW: Mark Wigley on Greening Architecture Academia
By Jill in Inhabitat

Buildings account for almost half (48%) of all greenhouse-gas emissions annually.
This oft-repeated statistic highlights what many architects and designers have long realized: The building industry has a profound impact on the state of our environment. In the past couple of years, “green building” has become trendy, led by a combination of concerned professionals, consumer demand, and opportunistic developers looking to distinguish their properties from the competition in a challenging real-estate market. But is environmental awareness really making enough inroads into the curriculum of design schools, in the places where it could potentially have the most impact on the future of the industry?

small, cool prefabs: a floating home/office and a retreat, aero 11 design
By Justin in materialicious
A couple of years ago I ran across the Airship Series of prefabs from Aero 11 Design on MocoLoco, and while the “Home” design is cool, my head was turned by the other two designs offered by the firm: the “Office” and the “Retreat”. I seem to recall seeing the floating home/office on the last page of Dwell magazine a few years back….? Whatever. These are awesome.

Zero-Emission Research Station in Antarctica

By Jorge in Inhabitat
If there is one place on our planet that can be said to be relatively free from human impact, that would probably be the Antarctic continent. With this in mind, the government of Belgium commissioned the International Polar Foundation to design and operate a new research station, the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica. The goal? To make it the first zero-emission station in the world.

Ouroussoff's Rough Day: Reviewing the NY Times' New Building
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
A really fun story over at Editor & Publisher about the difficulties faced by NY Times architecture critic, Niccolai Ouroussoff, when it came time yesterday to review the paper's new building. As he says, he was caught between a rock and a hard place...

Future Snow
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Every time the doors opened tonight on the tram ride home, an amazingly crisp and cold autumn air breathed into the cabin – and it smelled like snow, though no snow was in sight, and so I found myself thinking the two following things:
1) Weather control is the future of urban design.
2) If a city wants to attract new residents it should try scenting the snow.

November 19th, 2007

National Geographic's Maps: Tools for Adventure @ the Museum of Science and Industry
By Brendan in Where
If you typed the word "maps" into Google and then visited the first ten sites on the results page, you might get a good idea of what it feels like to walk through the Museum of Science and Industry's exhibit National Geographic's Maps: Tools for Adventure, which is part of the citywide Festival of Maps. That is to say: a nuanced overview of mapping technology, this is not. While the exhibit is kid-friendly, it tries a bit too hard to go after the attention deficit demographic. Thematically, the "tools for adventure" theme is the loose string that sort of ties things somewhat together, almost. In fact, between this, the City of the Future exhibit earlier this year, and the Christmas Around the World disaster that we'll discuss in a minute, I'm beginning to wonder if, perhaps, this legendary museum is just coasting on its historical reputation these days.

From the Last 50 in 150
By Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
At last week's Pecha Kucha night at the Ace Hotel Cleaners, I got talking with a local architect about today's new crop of buildings and the long-term outlook there will be for this era's architecture. He posed to me something along these lines: "I'm not sure if any of the buildings here from the last 50 years will still be here in 150 years." There's a lot of ways you could look at such a statement. Maybe it means that with green building and global warming taking off, in a century and a half so much will have changed about the physical, thermal and electrical aspects of architecture that there won't be a place for many of today's works to endure. Maybe it means that only the most exceptional buildings from the past survive for a century or more, because to go through the extra headaches and cost of preserving and restoring them, they have to resonate enough to be really worth it. Or, maybe it's just a cynical way of saying nothing we've built in Portland in the last half-century (since about 1957 if you're playing at home) is significant enough architecturally to merit being preserved.

Farm houses: the new style, by neill heath
By Justin in materialicious
The house on the cover of this beautiful book is The Freeman House, by Wayne Branum and Meghan Kell Cornell.

Boogie Fever
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
You may not know it, but you've probably seen the work of the Serbian-born, Brooklyn-based photographer known simply as...

Modern Farmhouse
By John Commoner in FUTURE HOUSE NOW
Modern farmhouse sounds like an oxymoron, but I've seen more than a few great looking modernist takes on the American homestead. One of my favorites is Farmhouse One, by the architecture firm of Durkee, Brown, Viveiros and Werenfels. It's a simple, traditionally inspired Rhode Island farmhouse with modern twists. Take a look. And if you're in to modern farmhouses you'll also be pleased to know there's a great blog dedicated to the genre - the appropriately named Farmhouse Modern. It's definitely worth a look (I found it on the LiveModern Blog Directory, where Future House Now is also listed).

Jetson Green: Wis Tavern
By architecture.MNP
Philip Proefrock, contributor over at Jetson Green writes:
The first Gold certified LEED-H home in Illinois is built from the renovation of an old neighborhood tavern. The 3,800 square foot building is used by the owners as both a residence and as the offices of their company: Smog Veil Records. The label has adopted an “eco-friendly” set of principles, and the owners felt their home/office ought to reflect those values as well. Daylighting, recycled materials, and efficient appliances were all part of this project. Inside, some of the floors are made of a terrazzo made from recycled glass and chunks of old vinyl records.

The Snow Queen’s railway
By Jotis Moore in Zaha Hadid Blog
Zaha Hadid’s mountain railway launches next month. The Nordpark Cable Railway follows Hadid’s ski jump in this tailormade landscape for her melodramatic architecture. Ripping across the Austrian Alps like a rollercoast

Nouvel Khan, Tatlin garnish
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
As a Chicagoan born and bred, it's impossible to look at Jean Nouvel's stunning new 53 West 53rd, a 75-story hotel/condo tower to be erected next to the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan, without thinking of its early precedents: the diagonal-braced tube skyscrapers of the great engineer Fazlur Khan, most especially the iconic John Hancock Building on North Michigan avenue, designed at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in collaboration with architect Bruce Graham. Separated by four decades, the two towers offer up cogent and contrasting expressions of their respective era's. Read all about it, and see the pictures, here.  Read more…
Rich Silverstein Visually Blogs for HuffPo and You Get to Critique Him...


November 18th, 2007

The Perfect High Street
By Chris in Brand Avenue
An entertaining video produced by Monocle envisions the "Perfect High Street," wherein the world's most delightfully upscale and idiosyncratic retailers populate the main drag of the imagination, in an "Instant City" kind of way. Watch. I had originally thought the video would be about architecture, but instead its focus is economic. (I can't afford a subscription, and therefore cannot read the accompanying article.) The street is characterized by a long succession of retailers you've never heard of. Necessities like groceries, banking, and a pharmacy--the experiences of which are normally rote and forgettable--are supplanted by stores plucked from locales as disparate as Japan and Switzerland that meet needs while also sating the senses.

An Exceptional Paradise
By Bryan Finoki in Subtopia
OK, I dug up some scoop on the migrant detention facility that’s being developed on the “Leeward North” side of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base directly adjacent to the “Windward” side where the terrorist suspects are being held at Camp Delta. I somehow missed a few news articles about this in the Camp Justice post a few days back – so, here’s an update....

A Very Good Week In NY This December
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
It's getting to be that season again when all the naughties and nices you've accumulated during the last 12 months...

Project7Ten Green House Completed in LA
By Evelyn in Inhabitat
Southern California is adding to its growing collection of uber-green LEED Platinum homes with the recent completion of the Project7Ten House. While the original renderings of this design looked promising, nothing inspires us more than seeing green buildings actually get built. The photographs of this recently constructed green house far surpass the original renderings we saw a few months back, and we are thrilled to see such an elegant eco-house for sale in LA.

Three houses by kochi architect’s studio
By Justin in materialicious
Fascinating….
KOCHI ARCHITECT’S STUDIO

California's Lesson for A Low-Carbon Future
By Mindy Lubber in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Residents of California, land of freeways and belching tailpipes, drive fewer miles per capita than the rest of the country. How's that for turning a stereotype on its head? It's true - and underscores a poignant lesson as the world drags its feet in addressing man-made global warming: While tackling climate change is good for the environment, it may be even better for the economy. The statistic is one of dozens of jaw-dropping nuggets in the inaugural "California Green Innovation Index," an initiative by the non-profit, non-partisan Next 10 group that is designed to track key indicators as California moves to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels. Consider this: Despite the state's reputation for high electricity costs, Californians, per capita, pay lower utility bills - less than half of residents in Texas, for example. Tougher building and appliance standards saved the state $56 billion by 2003 and are expected to save another $23 billion in the next five years. Energy efficiency allowed the state to avoid building 24 power plants in the last 30 years. With all the green talk today, the report gives something scientists and policy makers clamor for: Long term data. The Golden State began its... (more)

Casadecor miami 2007 exhibition now open
By Justin in materialicious
My friend JoAnn Locktov of Trendgroup-USA sent me the press release for this event:
CASADECOR ‘07: The urban showhouse hosts innovative ideas and materials from over 60 designers, architects, and manufacturers in a tantalizing array of design solutions and inspirations. Many of the interiors include sustainable materials, from the vertical “living wall” in the green urban oasis to the home office designed for the US Green Building Council. The exhibition takes place from November 9th, 2007 - December 16th, 2007, and is located at 1444 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33132. Trendgroup-USA is a sponsor with a booth at the show, so you just know this show is worth attending!

Airoots Gets Lost in Deep Urbanmess (Guest Post by Matias Sendoa Echanove and Rahul Srivastava)
By Brendan in Where
We arrive at a narrow commercial street lost somewhere between Bombay and Tokyo. It is crowded with pedestrians, bicycles, street vendors, food stalls, and wandering cows and dogs that don’t allow cars to pass through. Most of the buildings lining the street are two to three stories high, covered either with faded, dusty shop-signs painted in art-deco fonts, or snazzy neon lights. Billboards with smiling Manga faces and Bollywood movie stars eye each other warily. An intricate web of wires, pipes, pathways, and cables connect the buildings, huts, cottages and shop-fronts to each other. They hang overhead or lie snugly underground. They are like masses of snakes intertwined into each other – alive and organic. They buzz with whispering voices, crackle with coded e-mails and crisp exchange of smses, gurgle with water or sewage and are swollen with pornographic images looking for immediate release, along with religious icons that appear on screens of high-tech devotees who bow to them in tiny studios.

hudson residence, stephen atkinson architecture
By Justin in materialicious
Hudson Residence, St. Michael’s, Maryland. Stephen Atkinson is one of my favorite architects around. Some of you might recall his Zachary House, which he did for his parents down in Louisiana. There’s something subtle about his approach, and all his houses fit their environment, perfectly.

clara cabin, bryan meyer and anne ryan
By Justin in materialicious
A while ago, I posted a container cabin in Northern Minnesota (Holyoke Cabin) built by Hive Modular architect Paul Stankey and his wife Sarah Nordby, and now Stankey’s partner Bryan Meyer has posted the cabin he and his wife Anne Ryan built some years ago, called Clara Cabin…. Built on Ryan’s family property, the 220sf off-grid cabin is described as “a glorified tent - a primitive room in the woods”. I’m in love.

Foundation
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Steve Rose of the Guardian this morning greets us with a "magnificent art gallery with a ruined gothic church in the basement."
The gallery is in Cologne, Germany, it's called Kolumba, and it was recently designed by architect Peter Zumthor.
The building's "cavernous ground-floor room," Rose writes, "is dimly lit, but fresh air and dappled sunlight spill in from honeycomb-like perforations high above."
Even better: "Embedded in the light brick walls are the blackened windows and arches of a ruined gothic church, onto which this new building has been grafted." And, "disappearing into the depths and the darkness, are the excavated ruins of crypts, vaults and foundations."

The Smithsonian Collection: 'You're Gonna Love Sitting On Our History!'
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
There's that old saying, isn't there, when you're saying something negative about something someone owns? You spot a couch...

Zaha Hadid - Interview Part 4, 12/10/07
By Jotis Moore in Zaha Hadid Blog
Zaha Hadid is interviewed by Deyan Sudjic at the Design Museum. Follow the link to view the fourth part of this interview in full.


CLINTON LIBRARY GETS LEED PLATINUM

By Emily in Inhabitat
Gracing the river front of Little Rock, the William J. Clinton Presidential Library & Museum has just been been awarded a LEED Platinum rating after a recent round of “back to the drawing board” upgrades to the building. The green features that tipped the scales from the previously held LEED Silver rating to Platinum include more thorough green cleaning and recycling programs, climate-neutral and energy efficiency strategies, water-wise landscaping and a green roof.

New York's Green Future
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
By my count about 100 people gathered yesterday in Cooper Union's column-filled Great Hall to attend New York 2030: New York's Green Future, a public discussion among the authors of Mayor Bloomberg's PlaNYC and a panel of urban design experts, organized by the Institute for Urban Design. The morning was reserved for the "authors" of the plan, who gave Power Point presentations on the goals of PlaNYC, its various elements (parks, transportation, water, housing), and some inspirations for moving forward with the plan. What came across as the strongest point to me was that the plan is predicated on growth, specifically the addition of one million more people by 2030.

November 17th, 2007

Green, Green - in Germany and the U.S., and at Chicago Architectural Club Round Table
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Even as we head into the annual ceremony of ritual avian sacrifice, we're still adding events to the November calendar. This Tuesday, November 20th at 6:30 P.M., going up against Hernán Díaz Alonso's appearance at the Art Institute beginning a half hour earlier, the Chicago Architectural Club, at the iSpace Gallery, will be holding the first of what it expects to be a series of roundtable discussions, this one exploring the questions of: What is the role of the architect in the Green Revolution? What role does technology play? What about authorship? And what does "Green" mean, anyway? Have we been too quick to define the term?...

Revolving Door Roundup
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Another week, another raft of design-related personnel developments and switcheroos. Here's our roundup: Baccarat: The e French crystal firm has named Chafik Gasmi as its first artistic director. Gasmi has previously worked as artistic director at Sephora and watchmaker Ebel....


November 16th, 2007

Sustainable design has come of age.
By Jennifer Johnson -  November 2007

There was a time when green buildings facilities that incorporated elements to improve energy efficiency, reduce material waste and make a lighter footprint on the surrounding environment were seen by the industry as trendy, risky and unnecessarily expensive. But those days are gone...

architecture roundup, november 16
By Justin in materialicious
Casa de Invitados (Guest House), Licancheu, Chile. Straw bales, corrugated polycarbonate and zinc cladding, green roof. Very cool. AATA ARQUITECTOS via Plataforma Arquitectura
T-Bone House, Waiblingen, Germany. Is being in love with a car normal? COAST architecture via Wallpaper Magazine
Villa Deys, Rhenen, The Netherlands. Architectenbureau Paul de Ruiter via Modern Residential Design
House Alta, Älta, Sweden. Johannes Norlander Arkitektur via David Report blog
Casa Suntro, Morelos, Mexico. Jorge Hernandez de la Garza, Arquitecto
Shenandoah Retreat, North Fork of the Shenandoah River, Virginia. Carter Burden Architecture

Work Life Balance. From an Architects Perspective. (I).
By Christoph, anArchitecture in anArchitecture
Generally, in architectural practises, office hours get stretched a little bit. Not only for junior ranks or interns during peak periods – it’s common. You know - architectural practices have a lot of hour-sucking work. Funny enough, architects are often proud of that. Being surrounded mostly by colleagues younger than thirty might be a good indicator for an office with a bad work life balance policy. People tend to leave these kind of places when they get older and switch to a firm that reflects their demands for life: spend time with family and kids, develop new interests, learning a language, charity work, ...

SHAPE-SHIFTING CHAIR: Caterpillar by Anna Bullus
By Tylene in Inhabitat
We love designers who get their inspiration from the unexpected, and we love transforming, 2-for-1 furniture even more! Check out the Caterpillar, a flexible piece of furniture inspired by bicycle chains. Why settle for just one position, when Anna Bullus’s Caterpillar lounge chair can be maneuvered into at least 14 different positions. With such flexibility, its easy to find a position that fits your comfort.

The Lighter Side of 18th-Century French Interiors

By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 2:05 PM
Newly renovated galleries at The Frick Collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art show off 18th-century French artworks and objects...

WEEKEND READING: November 10-November 16, 2007 (Guest Post by Colin Kloecker)
By Colin in Where
Hi, I'm Colin and I usually cover the intersection of humanitarian issues, sustainability, and the built environment over at Blog Like You Give A Damn. But this month you'll find me here, curating Where's Weekend Reading segment. Five Items of interest for you this week. ITEM ONE: I've been saying it for years: Skyways suck the vitality out of our city streets, "we should tear them all down". Living in Minneapolis/St. Paul I often get blank or bewildered stares when I tell people this (which I probably do far too often), but I feel my argument has been bolstered now that top urban designers Jan Gehl and Gil Penalosa have come out and expressed a similar sentiment....

Ciao, Tokyo: Armani's Ginza Tower
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Call him Armani-San. Fashion designer Giorgio Armani has just unveiled his company's new flagship store in Tokyo's Ginza district. Designed...

Download, Read, and Comment on the Sustainable Sites Initiative Preliminary Report

By ASLA.org - The Dirt
This is a reminder that we are still in the 45-day open comment period for the Sustainable Sites Initiative preliminary report. Featuring over 200 recommendations for designing and building sustainable landscapes, the report is part of the Sustainable Sites Initiative, a partnership between ASLA, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas at Austin and the United States Botanic Garden to create voluntary guidelines and a rating system for sustainable landscape design. The 107-page preliminary report is available for download here and is filled with different strategies to help make sustainable choices for landscapes. So far the report has garnered strong interest and the sustainablesites.org website has seen a large bump in traffic since the report was announced. You are invited to give feedback on this report; comments are due no later than January 11, 2008. Save a tree and read the report online in pdf form!...

Nouvel Note
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Just a quick note on Jean Nouvel's latest design for Manhattan, a new 75-story tower for a site next to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in Midtown. Nicolai Ouroussoff asks, "How did a profit-driven developer become more adventurous architecturally than MoMA, which has tended to make cautious choices in recent years?" He answers his own question in with: Hines [who MoMA sold the site to] asked Mr. Nouvel to come up with two possible designs for the site. A decade ago anyone who was about to invest hundreds of millions on a building would inevitably have chosen the more conservative of the two. But times have changed. Architecture is a form of marketing now, and Hines made the bolder choice.

Today's archidose #155
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
IIT Entry Across, originally uploaded by ken mccown. The McCormick Tribune Campus Center at the Illinois Institute (IIT) of Technology by Rem Koolhaas/OMA. Be sure to check out Ken McCown's flickr set for more quality pics of the IIT building.

Why OMA is OMA and UnStudio Isn't Just Studio: How Firms Got Their Names
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Witold Rybczynski over at Slate has sought to answer a question we've sat and wondered about: "Building a Brand:...

Architectural graphics
By Crompton in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
The style of this beautiful book, with a shadow font above a slender serif font, all in red white and black with a hessian spine, is strongly reminiscent of the Architectural Review of the time.(Stevenage Development Corporation, 1950)

PREFAB FRIDAY: Office of Mobile Design’s Country School
By Emily in Inhabitat
Aaah to be a kid again- the carefree days, the lack of financial responsibility, and awesome prefab school environments like the Country School designed by Jennifer Siegal. The Los Angeles middle school expansion project opens next months to some very lucky kids who will enjoy classrooms filled with light, open learning spaces, and the best and healthiest materials. We’re big fans of Jennifer and her Office of Mobile Design here at Inhabitat, and we’re thrilled that her great prefab designs are being successfully applied to educational contexts- what better way to learn and teach than in a wonderful healthy classroom?

Putti Gone Wild

By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Via the indefatigable Joan Pomaranc comes word that an antique bronze clock and matching candelabra owned by the late theater historian Joseph DuciBella will be put up for auction on Sunday, November 25th by Elgin's Bunte Auction. DuciBella, who died this past June, had rescued the ensemble from the Magnolia Street side of the lobby of the Uptown Theater, the grand, 1926 4000-seat Chicago movie palace that has been shuttered since 1981. (Chicago Inside is again reporting that no less than two national promoters - Jam Productions and Live Nation - are interested in rescuing the severely decayed landmark from its long slumber.)...

November 15th, 2007

(Half) Billion Dollar Baby
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
In still another milestone in the city's growing TIF scandal, Crain's Chicago Business reported today that Cook County Clerk David Orr estimates that for the new tax year, the amount of money diverted into Chicago's TIF districts will cross the half-billion dollar mark, to $500.4 million, 29% more than just the year before, and triple the amount diverted just five years ago. At this rate, the amount of money diverted into TIF's may soon eclipse undiverted revenues - $820 million in 2008.

Win A Subscription to dwell
By architecture.MNP
That’s right my ninjas - we here at MNP are giving away a subscription to dwell [I believe that’s 10 issues over 12 months] to one of our readers. How do you get in on this, you ask? It’s simple - every visitor who leaves a comment [a content-related comment, not just ‘first!’ or something foolish] on ANY MNP SITE, along with their email address will be entered. The ninjas will then select a commenter at random, and name the winner on Novermber 26th. Every individual comment counts [the more you comment, the more likely you are to win] so visit all of our sites and let your voice be heard....

The Carbon Footprint of That Glass of Vino
By Emily Gertz in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
So -- you're an average, eco-conscious resident of the Boston-to-Washington megacity corridor, and you're worried about food miles: the distance your edibles are transported in greenhouse gas-belching glory to arrive on your plate. You act by ignoring the pile of New Zealand Gala apples at the greengrocer in favor of locally grown Macintoshes, and buying rounds of artisanal Vermont blue at the weekly greenmarket instead of bricks of mystery cheddar at the supermarket....

Henry Liu's Green Fly-Ash Bricks
By Ugo Okafor in African Architecture and Design
The National Science Foundation website says "...Researchers have found that bricks made from fly ash--fine ash particles captured as waste by coal-fired power plants--may be even safer than predicted. Instead of leaching minute amounts of mercury as some researchers had predicted,the bricks apparently do the reverse, pulling minute amounts of the toxic metal out of ambient air. Each year, roughly 25 million tons of fly ash from coal-fired power plants are recycled, generally as additives in building materials such as concrete, but 45 million tons go to waste. Fly ash bricks both find a use for some of that waste and counter the environmental impact from the manufacture of standard bricks.

visual inspiration: stock surfaces, by judy juracek
By Justin in materialicious
STOCK SURFACES is a resource for architectural, decorative, botanical, and landscape photographs. This site also provides a way to explore and preview Judy Juracek’s series of visual research books: SURFACES, SOFT SURFACES, NATURAL SURFACES and ARCHITECTURAL SURFACES.
The SURFACES books are compact picture libraries of images of man-made and natural surfaces, organized specifically for artists, architects, designers, illustrators, and picture editors. Some of the photographs are detailed views shot for the purpose of showing specific materials, layouts, weaves, patterns, textures, and architectural details...
STOCK SURFACES

Keep Off the Grass: Succulents Don't Suck
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 3:39 PM
As green roofs proliferate, landscape architects have had to consider what best to green them with. So far, the green roof resident of choice seems to be members of the ultra-resilient sedum family. The super drought-tolerant, adorably sculptural succulents are really the perfect plant...

MARTINO GAMPER: 100 Chairs in 100 Days
By Ariana in Inhabitat
Martino Gamper has a penchant for furniture: to be specific, chairs. In his project 100 Chairs in 100 Days, he takes apart a mix of discarded and systematically collected pieces found on London’s street corners (or sympathetic friends’ lounges and living rooms) over a period of two years, disassembles and then reworks them, creating unique, functional chairs that blend the “stylistic and structural elements of the found ones.”

Can G-E and GBD Make M&F another WK?
By Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
A few weeks ago Portland's most prolific central city developer, Gerding-Edlen, announced they have purchased the old Meier & Frank warehouse in the Pearl District. Instead of condominiums or luxury apartments, which have comprised most Pearl projects, this one will have offices. Unsurprisingly but still impressively, Gerding-Edlen and their usual design collaborator, GBD Architects, have announced that the project will be targeted to earn the top 'Platinum' LEED rating from the US Green Buidling Council. That will mean things like solar panels, a green roof, and toilets flushed with rainwater. I'm guessing there will also be a very large atrium in the middle to flood the interior space with natural light...

three houses by olavi koponen
Justin in materialicious
Okay, I think I’ll just pack right now, and move to Finland. Olli Koponen’s houses are fantastic. Sure, the first one, Kotilo, is rather spectacular, but the other two are a terrific study in green building. Koponen, describing Villa Långbo, says: “All materials can be recycled, main material timber is local, construction was manual, a part of construction materials have been transported wintertime by horses and nature has been tampered as little as possible.”...

DUBIOTECH: New Largest Green Building in Dubai
By Mahesh in Inhabitat
The new headquarters of Dubiotech (in Dubai, of course! We do love our puns…), is set to be one of the world’s largest green buildings. The LEED certified 22-story headquarters and laboratory buildings will be home to the center of excellence for biotechnology education and research, with two connected buildings oriented to maximize day-lighting and views while minimizing solar gain. It will also integrate a 500,000 sq ft animal reserve for indigenous conservation and wildlife protection.The design comes form design firm CUH2A, and is scheduled for completion in 2009.

Chicago Streetscenes - Bridgework, Towards the Light

By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS

Literary Dose #18
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
"Reduction is always risky, but [Alvaro] Siza's observations [on his working process] could be simplified in this manner: place: origin of all architecture."


November 14th, 2007

The Predatory Lending Association
By Alex Steffen in WorldChanging
Sometimes explaining a problem in a particularly creative way can be a form of solution. Predatory lending in mortgages, credit cards and payday loans has been revealed as a central issue in North America over the last year, but many people still seem to have difficulty understanding what it is, how widespread it has become, and why we need regulatory action to solve it. Enter The Predatory Lending Association!...

Peter Shire's House Is More Than a Place To Put His Butt
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
We have been loving on the LA Times design stories lately, although it may just be that due to a sweet website design we can actually read them now without our pupils melting all over the keyboard. David Keeps takes us inside the Los Angeles, all-the-colors-of-the-rainbow home of Peter Shire, who we love for eternity because of this quote: "A chair, Peter Shire says, is 'more than just where we put our butts.'"...

Climate Change Escapism
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
The Guardian recently introduced us to a series of images, produced by artists Pedro Armestre and Mario Gómez, for a new project by Greenpeace.
The images show us what Spain will look like in the future, in a world transformed by climate change. The basic idea here is that these visions of flooded resort hotels, parched farmlands, and abandoned villages, half-buried in sand, will inspire us to take action against climate change. Seeing these pictures, such logic goes, will traumatize people into changing how they live, vote, consume, and think. You can visually shock them into action, in other words: one or two glimpses of pictures like these and you'll never think the same way about climate change again. But I'm not at all convinced that that's what these images really do.

Architects are lower down the pecking order now!
By admin in mirage.studio.7
Is architecture a tougher job these days?
The trouble is architects are lower down the pecking order now. You are almost seen as a subcontractor who provides drawings. When we came out of college, people used to sweep the site before we went to visit. However young, spotty and inexperienced you were, you were the architect, so you were important. You can’t really say that anymore. Maybe it is more friendly not having a hierarchy, but I don’t think it quite reflects what architects do. It is a stupendously difficult job. Every architect seems to be shouting the same thing - ‘Underpaid’, ‘Too Much Work’, ‘It Tough!’ and blah blah blah, and they end it with - ‘I did it because of passion.’ Ironic.

Medellín: a City Planned for the Other 90% (Guest Post by Juliana Rincon)
By Brendan in Where
Medellín, Colombia, is a city that I've fallen in love with, and it loves me back. Whenever I walk its streets, ride the metro, or take a bus, I feel that the city was planned with me, and with all the thousands of others who, like me, don't own a car and depend on public transportation to move around, in mind. An example: Carabobo used to be a chaotic avenue full of seedy joints and the constant rumble of old buses expelling diesel fumes. The beautiful art deco buildings along the avenue were left unnoticed as people rushed to their destinations enclosed in the safety of a vehicle. At the far end of the street was a no-man's land where you could see homeless people warming their hands with bonfires made in steel drums, and where everything and everyone had a price. Beautiful buildings were abandoned, scavenged and then abused as crack houses, businesses where struggling to maintain customers, and something had to be done.

ecomod, university of virginia school of architecture
By Justin in materialicious
ecoMOD is a research and design / build / evaluate project at the University of Virginia School of Architecture that aims to create a series of ecological, modular and affordable house prototypes. Working in partnership with the UVA School of Engineering and Applied Science, our goal is to demonstrate the environmental and economic potential of prefabrication, and to challenge the modular and manufactured housing industry in the U.S. to explore this potential. In the context of this multi-year project, an interdisciplinary group of architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, historic preservation, business, environmental science, planning and economics students are participating in the design, construction and evaluation phases of the project. Three prototypes are being developed for Piedmont Housing Alliance, and one for Habitat for Humanity.

the future of mud, a film by susan vogel
By Justin in materialicious
Remember my post, Mud Mosques of Mali ? If you’re as interested in this most ancient (and very relevant) form of architecture as I am, you’ll want to see this film… This is the story of Komusa, master mason and heir to the secrets of Djenné architecture. He hopes his son will continue the family profession and maintain their world heritage city - but Djenne is connected to a global world now, and competing ideas about the future have arrived. Documentary footage and staged scenes tell an intimate story of family tensions, contemporary building practices, and the precarious future of the renowned mud architecture of Mali.

BMW Welt: Solar-powered Masterpiece in Munich
By Ali in Inhabitat
An elegance of dynamics drives the design of the new BMW Welt - a stunning solar-powered shrine to German auto engineering. Crafted by world renowned architect Wolf Prix of COOP HIMMELB(L)AU, this sculptural, high-performance structure opened in October to serve as BMW’s center for refinement of brand experience and vehicle delivery in Munich.

Today's archidose #154
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Villa Bio, originally uploaded by jmtp.
Villa Bio in Llers, Spain by Enric Ruiz Geli.


November 13th, 2007 

Australia Grapples With Climate Crisis
By Emily Gertz in WorldChanging
While advocates of the Kyoto Protocol have grumbled over Australia's international stand with the U.S. against the treaty, apparently it's a different thing altogther on the Aussie domestic front -- where global warming-related impacts are already becoming apparent with severe drought, low rainfall and record hot summers. According to "The Climate Crucible,"an excellent article by Maywa Montenegro in SEED magazine, this is giving rise to a native optimism that global warming can be solved: While other nations are debating how best to tackle a somewhat nebulous future scenario of climate change, for Australia that future is today....

Attract First, Please Later: Museum Design Lessons from P.T. Barnum
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Phineas Taylor Barnum never really said "There's a sucker born every minute," (that's an urban legend, sucker) but the idea...

Half Dose #39: Rolling Huts
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
One of the recipients of this year's AIA Seattle Honor Awards is the aptly-named Rolling Huts by the critic's darlings, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects. The firm's embrace and occasional forays into the industrial is clearly evident here, with their steel wheels, frame and less-than-polished surfaces. The architects responded to local restrictions that restricted cabins (a building "type" this office appears to produce almost constantly), "hit[ting] upon the idea of placing the structures on wheels, effectively making the huts into RVs."...

new england green

By architecture.MNP
Gillette Stadium is apparently going green - sort of. Patriots owner Bob Kraft is set to announce that the team will be buying wind credits to offset all the power used during the games. Not as good as building your own turbines, but its a start. Head on over to Green.MNP for more

Build Boston 2007
By architecture.MNP
Build Boston 2007 begins today! Running from Tuesday November 13th through Thursday November 15th, Build Boston ‘is the premier regional tradeshow and convention for the design and construction industry’. If you’re in the Bean head on over to the Seaport World Trade Center for seminars, lectures, workshops, and a giant exhibition hall full of people trying to sell products and giving out free shit. Sounds great - I’ll be there handing out myninjaplease business cards and doing my best to act professional [meaning no katana or shurikens, unfortunately - besides, I think world trade center + ninja weaponry = Guantanamo and waterboarding].

"What Elephant?" says Civic Federation report
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
The Civic Federation released its report on TIF's (tax increment financing) today, and the local media are reading into it what they want to see. The Chicago Tribune, big corporate's best friend who's been largely silent on the Chicago TIF scandal, ran its story under this headline:
Special tax districts hit wallets but spur growth, study finds. Study says spurring growth is trade-off...

Mapping Manifest Destiny @ The Newberry Library

By Brendan in Where
From a curatorial standpoint, Mapping Manifest Destiny at the Newberry Library (which is in a gorgeous building, in case you were wondering) is an excellent exhibit. The gallery space where the maps are displayed is large and quiet, and the information is carefully organized into four color-coded areas that not chart the history of the North American West through cartography. The four sections chart the progression of the continent from exotic terra nova at the edge of the world to civilized nation linked by a sophisticated network of railroads by defining the primary focus of mapmaking in four different eras of exploration. You can basically watch the centuries-long process of the formation of the United States (and Canada and Mexico, to lesser extents) take place in under an hour. In addition, scale is provided by the inclusion of maps that detail Chicago's own growth from a swampy outpost into a major transportation hub for the rapidly-growing nation. It's downright artful curation....


November 12th, 2007 

LTL Architects : Building 82%
By architecture.MNP
So for the first time ever on architecture.MNP an architecte de la semaine is spilling over to a second week. Oddly enough, we’ve really only featured one project by LTL Architects [hence the feature carrying over]. So enjoy a few more projects by Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis - and check in with us on Wednesday for a review of their new book. Here we have Building 82% [or, the West Avenue Lofts] a feasibility study that LTL took through SD’s [presumably for some developer] for a mixed-use development in Miami Beach. The project gets its name from the local zoning requirements, which states that no more than 82% of the available volume on the site could be built, per the site’s FAR requirements. This project serves as a good example of the firm’s playful + accepting approach to design, utilizing the ‘limiting’ conditions found in a project to their advantage - designing ‘opportunistically‘...

Raising the Bar on Green Business
By Emily Gertz in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Alex will be featured in CNN's documentary 'Just Imagine.', which premieres towards the end of November. In 'Just Imagine,' hosted by UK designer Ross Lovegrove, Alex discusses the future of traditional media, with WorldChanging as an example of how people are gathering online in ever greater numbers to share information and create a better world. In addition to Alex, featured experts range from Sakyo Yasuaki, dean of the Shibuya University in Tokyo -- a placeless university where anyone can teach and classes can take place anywhere -- to Naomi Halas, Professor of Chemistry and Bioengineering at Rice University in Texas, who discusses the impact nano-technology based treatments may have on health care in the developing world. "What will life be like in 2020? Guided by some of the world's leading visionaries, Just Imagine takes a look at the possibilities of tomorrow..."

Louis Sullivan: Under Construction
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Last November, we were covering the destruction of the 1888 George Harvey House, the last of no less than three rare, irreplaceable Adler & Sullivan designed structures to be destroyed by fire in a single year. 2007 comes to close on a more positive note. This time it's not destruction, but construction that's going on at another three of Louis Sullivan's designs. Last year, Sullivan's ornate long-lost cornice for his 1899 Carson Pirie Scott store was beautifully reconstructed under the direction of preservation architect Gunny Harboe, just in time for the century-old department store to announce it would be closing its doors early in 2007. The new owner, Joseph Freed & Associates, is in the process of converting most of the structure to office space, and is still seeking tenants for retail on the lower floors.

November 11th, 2007

Today's archidose #153
By John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
New Museum, originally uploaded by archidose.
The New Museum of Contemporary Art by SANAA in New York City, opening on the first of December.

Theatre of the water
By Young in Architecture
My friends told me the eye of Malaysia is closing year end, just before it closes, I dropped by for a look at night and discovered something more interesting~! The theatre of the water. Despite the dancing water, the stunning visual effect of the laser beam on water screen is the most fasinating attraction there~! Take look if you are in Malaysia, 8pm/9pm 15mins water screen show. "Rising mystically from the placid lake surface, the many engaging facets and wondrous delights of Malaysia materialize each evening in a kaleidoscope of amazing images and colourful lighting effects. The world’s largest and most powerful screens of water come to Malaysia to create Theatre of The Waters – a visually stunning, living tapestry around Lake Titiwangsa’s shoreline, presenting the people, places and achievements of Malaysia. Each of the four screens of water is a massive 40 metres wide and 15 metres high, artistically enhanced with colour laser beams and high-lux projectors. Theatre of The Waters premieres Saturday 3 February and screens each night through 2007." to find out more...

Farewell to Norman
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS - November 11, 2007
Brooklyn, however, beautiful Brooklyn, grew beneath the skyscrapers of Manhattan, so it never became a great city, merely an asphalt herbarium for talent destined to cross the river. Chicago did not have Manhattan to preempt the top branches, so it grew up from the savory of its neighborhoods to some of the best high-rise architecture

Networks for Change
WorldChanging Team - November 11, 2007
By WorldChanging Chicago blogger Jason Diceman There is no shortage of articles about how social networking sites like MySpace and FaceBook can be used to support grassroots and progressive campaigns and professional networking sites like Linkedin and XING can help you get connected in your sector, but what about the networking sites specifically created to support social and environmental causes?

Secret Gardens: Making City Blocks Green to the Core
WorldChanging Team - November 11, 2007
By WorldChanging New York guest blogger Adam Brock Sometimes Manhattan can feel like an uninterrupted smear of asphalt, stone and concrete. If your daily routine doesn't happen to take you through a park, the occasional street planting might be the only flora you see on a given day. But that urban wildlife corridor might be closer at hand than you think: a quick Google Earth survey of the city reveals that most blocks are, in fact, donut-shaped, with apartments ringing the street and a substantial chunk of open space...

That ZENN Moment
WorldChanging Team - November 11, 2007
One way to enter the electric car market, is through the high end, as Tesla or Venturi have done: offer high-performance vehicles with a high-end price tag -- EV as status symbol. Another way to enter is through the low end. Offer an inexpensive, low-speed vehicle that is good for lugging groceries. The ZENN (Zero Emissions No Noise) car is one such offering, and it's made in St. Jerome, Quebec, by Feel Good Cars of Toronto. There aren't many Canadian designed and built cars, let alone Canadian designed electric cars. The ZENN is considered to be a success story for ITAQ (the Québec Advanced Transportation Institute). ITAQ and Feel Good Cars won a prestigious international award for sustainable mobility in June (the Gold medal in the urban vehicle category at the Michelin Bibendum Challenge).



November 9th, 2007 

LTL Architects : New Suburbanism
By architecture.MNP - November 09, 2007
This is an older project by LTL Architects [we’ll be getting to current work, don’t worry] entitled New Suburbanism : Prototypical American Suburb [one of the firm’s ‘speculations‘, the project was part of the 2000 National Design Triennial exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt Museum - and was updated for the 2004 Venice Architecture Biennale]. The project is a proposal for a new approach to the idea of the ’suburb’ and how it should be planned/laid out/experienced, responding to [basically] the failure of the American suburb to live up to the hype - and the subsequent failures of newer movements [such as New Urbanism].

On the (Lisbon) Waterfront
By Crouchback in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE - November 09, 2007
The Council for European Urbanism (CEU) has informed us about a Symposium concerned particularly with the Lisbon waterfront projects: The symposium will address the urgent issues raised by the Lisbon waterfront projects in the context of the C.E.U. Charter. We will debate a wide range of strategies...

YiAhn Convertible Bassinet
By Ali in Inhabitat - November 09, 2007
Clean, modern lines and eco design define the YiAhn bassinet- but this early life sanctuary is designed for functionality well beyond baby’s first three months. Rather than buying into the high-priced, short-lived bassinets he found on the market, Brooklyn-based industrial designer Chul Min Kang was inspired by the approaching arrival of his first child to create newborn furniture that honors healthy growth and extended functionality. The bassinet turns from baby bed to toy bin and bookshelf to chair and table- meeting your little one’s furniture needs all the way through elementary school.

Ecotots Flatpak Green Furniture for Kids
By Kate in Inhabitat - November 09, 2007
Take a small stand for the environment (or in this case a seat, a coat stand or art easle). Ecotots is a full-line of environmentally friendly, real wood modern furniture and furnishings which assemble and disassemble quickly and easily without any tools or hardware. Made from 100% renewable FSC Certified Smart Wood®, all products are available in a variety of eco-friendly, UV finishes.

Pambazuka News: Blogging Africa
By WorldChanging Team - November 09, 2007
Review of African Blogs, 2007-11-08 By Dibussi Tande Chika Okeke-Agulu comments on the death of pioneer Nigerian novelist Cyprian Ekwensi: I am deeply saddened by this news of the death of the pioneer Nigerian novelist Cyprian Ekwensi this week. He was 86. Ekwensi, the author of arguably the earliest major novel in Nigeria (People of the City, 1954) and other vastly popular novels--Passport of Mallam Illya, African Night's Entertainment, Lokotown, Jagua Nana, The Drummer Boy, etc-

Costa Rica and New Zealand on Path to Carbon Neutrality
By WorldChanging Team - November 09, 2007
While some of the world's largest emitters of greenhouse gases (GHGs) hem and haw about how to--or even if to--limit their contributions to climate change, at least two small countries are blazing trails for the world to follow. Both Costa Rica and New Zealand have declared over the past several months their intentions to become carbon neutral.

FH SoCal Fires Fundraiser Tomorrow in San Francisco!

By Emily in Inhabitat - November 09, 2007
In response to the recent Southern California wildfires, Architecture For Humanity’s San Francisco Chapter is co-hosting a fundraiser for the rebuilding efforts TOMORROW NIGHT in San Francisco with Open Productions and In Deep. If you’re in the Bay Area, come on down for the DJs, drinks, and do-good party action to support our friends at AFH:
Location: Shine, 1337 Mission St.@ 9th, San Francisco, CA 94103
Time: Saturday, November 10th, 9pm-2am
Cost: $5 donation goes to AFH San Francisco and Southern California chapters

Yesterday in Milan
By Crouchback in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE - November 09, 2007
Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR. Yesterday in Milan. Torre Velasca by BBPR (Gianluigi Banfi, Lodovico Belgiojoso, Enrico Peressutti, Ernesto Rogers), 1954. Tags: cia, continuity, milan, milano, italy, velasca.
 
PREFAB FRIDAY: Michelle Kaufmann’s mkLoft design
By Abigail in Inhabitat - November 09, 2007
It is no surprise that Inhabitat is a big fan of Michelle Kaufmann (MKD)’s eco-pre-fab designs. We previously featured her mkLotus design during its debut at West Coast Green in San Francisco this past September, and we are now pleased to announce that Kaufmann is again setting new standards for pre-fab luxury with her mkLoft design for savvy home owners. The two-story, two-bedroom, two-bathroom plus loft sets the stage for flexible and spacious environmentally sound surroundings for city or suburban dwellers who are looking to achieve clean, green, healthy living without sacrificing the open plan benefits of the loft lifestyle.

The City of Secret Burial Grounds
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG - November 09, 2007
Being inclined to spend time remembering things, I just made this map of my old flat in London. I lived there five years ago. How unbelievably bizarre it is to scroll around on that thing and remember street names, restaurants, transport routes to work...

WEEKEND READING: November 3-November 9, 2007 (Guest Post by Colin Kloecker )
By Colin in Where - November 09, 2007
This week -- Near future urbanism: how an ubiquitous and multi-layered network might effect our urban environment. Photo: OiMax (via Flickr). Moore's Law tells us that computing technology is advancing exponentially – essentially doubling every two years...

 

November 8th, 2007 

On Dec. 1st, Zaha Hadid Puts the Fun Back in Funicular
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige - November 08, 2007
Go over to your Stendig wall calendar and draw a swervy modernist shape around December 1st, because that's the...


MIT Alleges Flaws in Frank Gehry’s Building
By admin in mirage.studio.7 - November 08, 2007
According to Yahoo News, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is suing renowned architect Frank Gehry, alleging serious design flaws in the Stata Center, a building celebrated for its unconventional walls and radical angles. Gehry’s respond? In an interview, Mr. Gehry, whose firm was paid $15 million for the project, said construction problems were inevitable in the design of complex buildings. “These things are complicated,” he said, “and they involved a lot of people, and you never quite know where they went wrong. A building goes together with seven billion pieces of connective tissue....


P’kolino’s Klick Puzzle Chair
By Evelyn in Inhabitat - November 08, 2007

London 2090 A.D.
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG - November 08, 2007
I seem to be under the influence of H.G. Wells this week, but something about the previous post reminded me of Wells's novel The Sleeper Awakes.
In that book we follow the shocked but exhilirated travails of a man who wakes up in London 200 years in the future – only to find that he's become some sort of Messiah...
So the plot is not exactly interesting, but the book's descriptions of architecture are extraordinary. London, we read, has become a place of "vast and vague architectural forms." The book's central character – the Sleeper, named Graham – looks around himself, spatially overwhelmed. He becomes aware of "balconies, galleries, great archways giving remoter perspectives, and everywhere people, a vast arena of people, densely packed and cheering."

Stacked Cathedrals
By Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG - November 08, 2007
This project made the rounds several months ago – and commenters the blog world over found it worthy of ridicule – but I've been reading St. Peter's and so I have to wonder what would happen if you stacked cathedrals this way. A church made of bridges, all of which cross one another and lead back into themselves through cantilevered wings and side-chapels.

House in the countryside, ábalos & herreros
By Justin in materialicious - November 08, 2007
Casa en el campo (House in the countryside), Mallorca, Spain. Two identical facades: kitchen, bedroom and bathroom face north to the woods and hills behind the house; dining room, living room and study face south overlooking the village and surrounding fields of Artá.

HELIX WIND TURBINE: Small Wind Gets Smart
By Ali in Inhabitat - November 08, 2007
Harnessing wind power for use in residential applications has been a challenge, but a new breed of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) from Helix Wind offers a promising design that may change the way we do wind at home. The Helix Wind Savonious 2.0 uses a unique rotor capable of capturing omni-directional winds to provide quieter, kinder small wind power for your urban home.

Slate Helps Ring in the MoMA's 78th
By mediabistro.com: UnBeige - November 08, 2007

World Urbanism Day
Brendan in Where - November 08, 2007
In honor of World Urbanism Day (aka Town Planning Day), I thought it would be interesting to take a look at what might become of some of the world's great cities if global warming's worst case scenario came to pass. Scientists estimate that, were all of the ice caps and snow pack on earth to melt, the sea level would be somewhere between 230-260 feet (70-80 m) higher than it is today. The images above were created using Google Maps and a filter from Hey What's That dot com.

STOOSarchitekten : House Kern
By architecture.MNP - November 08, 2007
STOOSarchitekten designed this home [House Kern], which was built in Switzerland - you can head on over to WAN to read more. I just wanted to throw this image up here alongside the one below of the Casa Poli [by Pezo von Ellrichshausen Arquitectos] that we featured on MNP a while back now [They were one of the first architecte de la semaine features]. Similar? Just a little bit. But I’m cool with that - I’m feelin’ the boxy house with square openings bunched in/through it.

First LEED Platinum Carbon Neutral Building!
By Jorge in Inhabitat - November 08, 2007
Carbon-neutral buildings are not new news, but the first-ever LEED-platinum carbon neutral building certainly is. The Aldo Leopold Foundation Headquarters, located in Wisconsin, has been certified as the the first ever, fully LEED-platinum certified, carbon neutral building in the world, making it the greenest building ever built, with zero footprint and great design.


November 7th, 2007 

London and Chicago Olympic Stadiums - Separated at Birth?
By Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS - November 07, 2007

Mies-on-a-Beam
By architecture.MNP - November 07, 2007
Yesterday, 9:21 PM
..Mies-on-a-Beam [first published in Pamphlet Architecture 21: Situation Normal]. Here’s the firm’s brief description, as found in their book Opportunistic Architecture: What if the cleaning system for the windows of the Seagram building was considered a landscape supplement, returning function to the two anomalous, nonfunctional aspects of the building: the I-beams and the tree plaza? How can one do more with less-is-more?

Green Parenting Web Site: Good or No?
By Emily Gertz in WorldChanging - November 07, 2007

I'd like to ask the parents in our readership: take a look at this green parenting site, and come back to tell us in the comments how useful and original it is for you in greening up your everyday decisions about how to feed your family. Is the info substantial? Does it seem helpful, or just prey on your anxieties? "Green web sites" seem to be hatching by the dozen every week. And PR announcements about most of them seem to make their way to the WC general mailbox, from whence they depart to their final resting place in my Trash folder...

Edgar’s Garden
By CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE - November 07, 2007
The garden made by Edgar Wood at Monte Calvario, Porto Maurizio, Liguria around 1935 has a theatrical air. His housekeeper, to whom he bequeathed the villa, is sitting on the bench.

Last Chance to see Zaha Hadid - Architecture and Design
By Jotis Moore - November 07, 2007


Book and Event of the Moment
By John - November 07, 2007
Attending a "conversation" earlier tonight with Michael Sorkin and Bernd Zimmerman, I not only heard a good deal of fodder for forthcoming posts on this page but learned about a couple things of immediate interest. First is the recent publication of Sorkin's latest book, Indefensible Space: The Architecture of the National Insecurity State, with essays examining "how [the] anxiety-laden mindset erodes spaces both architectural and personal, encroaching on all aspects of everyday life."...


Dangerous Curves Ahead: Gehry Sued By MIT
By Unbeige - November 06, 2007
When we heard that Frank Gehry had been sued, it was not, as we had expected, by Barry Diller for designing a structurally-unsound InterActiveCorp HQ unable to support all internet entities within. Instead, he's being hung out to dry by MIT, who is claiming its Stata Center (angular strife illustrated in AP photo to the right) has "serious design flaws"....

Architecture? Real Estate! (3)
Christoph, anArchitecture - November 06, 2007
data from Trend 10/2007 (Austrian business magazine). Usually real estate isn’t a big topic in architects’ education, however, architect should be aware of the value of their work. Especially how to deal with non architecture related circumstances causing a serious impact to a project (and that's basically location).

Beijing Great Wheel
By Mirage Studio 7 - November 06, 2007
Remember my previous post - Eye of the world and the Pakistan Eye? The Chinese government began construction on the Great Wheel of China (220meters, 680 feet), believed to be the world’s tallest ferris wheel provided that Dubai (Dubai Eye at 200meters, 600 feet) doesn’t go back to the drawing board.

Wooden house, atelier klanc
By Materialicious - November 06, 2007
Wooden House of Červená Rokle (Red Gulch), Lety u Dobříchovic, Czech Republic. Built: 2004. By now, it should come as no surprise that I’m absolutely mad about little houses built of wood, and I’ve fallen hard for this ‘cabin’ design by Tomáš Klanc’s firm.

Architecture Travel: Unpronounceable, Unforgettable Bogk
By Judson - November 06, 2007
Hello Wisconsin! Decades before actual rock stars roamed the Earth, Frank Lloyd Wright was the artist in the papers for drugs, divorce and loose morals. Amid the especially turbulent "lost years" of 1910-1922, Wright found the time to return to his native Wisconsin to design the elegant Bogk House in Milwaukee.

Foster in firing line over U2 Tower...
By Richard Waite
The never-ending controversy surrounding the proposed U2 tower in Dublin has taken yet another twist after conservationists warned of potential legal action over the latest plans by Foster + Partners.

Preservation of Historic Muslim Architecture on exhibit at Symphony Center - Wright Wasmuth Portfolio show extended
BY Lynn Becker November 06, 2007
The Aga Khan Historic Cities Programme Exhibition will be making a stop at Symphony Center, 220 South Michigan Avenue, this weekend, part of a ten city American tour. A project of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, Historic Cities, established in 1992, promoting "the conservation and re-use of buildings and public spaces in historic cities in the Muslim World" and how it can "build bridges, not only between the past and present in the Muslim world, but also between the Muslim world and the West."...


 


RETAIL: NEW ZAHA HADID VASE
By Simon Armstrong Nov 5th, 2007
Crevasse Vase, by Zaha Hadid / produced by Alessi is now available at the Design Museum. Zaha Hadid is widely known for consistently testing the boundaries of architecture, urbanism, and design. This vase, designed by Hadid and produced by Alessi, is polished 18/10 stainless steel.

The Inner World of Frank Gehry
By CHRISTOPH - November 05, 2007
...Weird thoughts indeed. Accordingly to Gehry good architecture can only evolve in a society that favours the individual genius. Maybe we can exist without significant architecture and make architecture more community-driven?...

Fuzzy Logic thinking
BY YOUNG - November 05, 2007
"According to Christopher Alexander, compartmentalization and the dissociation of internal elements are potential signs of anarchy and schizophrenia. Fuzzy logic thinking is another step of helping human thought to recognize our environment less as a world of crisp boundaries and disconnections and more as a field of swarming agents with blurred borders....

Cool built-in stairs, splyce design/build, inc.
By Materialicious - November 05, 2007
A previously unused space under an existing stair to the roof deck, was replaced with a multi-purpose millwork element. Framed with standard lumber, and covered with maple veneered panels, this piece provides roof deck access, as well as audio/video equipment storage and a built-in gas fireplace... 

Best Brick Wall in England?

By by Crompton - November 4th, 2007
Moss Side Bus Garage, Manchester, has a splendid arch facing Princess Road, but the side elevation is even more remarkable: it swerves between colossal buttresses with flush Portland stone caps. All the details are odd. Even though it is blemished by signs and botched repairs this is one the best brick walls in England.

Yours for the Peeping
By Penelope Green - November 4th, 2007
JEREMY FLETCHER and Alejandra Lillo, designers at Graft, an architecture and design firm based in Berlin, Beijing and Los Angeles, were working out a dialogue between voyeurism and exhibitionism, they said, when they designed the swooping, shiny white interiors of the W Downtown, a glass-walled condominium tower to be built in 2009 in Manhattan’s financial district...


ReThink Development: Cherokee Lofts
by Evelyn - November 2nd 2007
Designed by Pugh + Scarpa in collaboration with Rethink Development and Consulting, Cherokee Lofts is slated to become the first privately developed LEED Gold certified mixed-use project in Southern California. The development is scheduled for completion in early 2009 and will house 12 lofts and 2,800 sf of commercial space. All this in a modern and very green package- what more could you ask for?...

Manchester, so much to answer for
By Continuity in Architecture - November 2nd 2007
Continuity in Architecture Year 5 students anticipate their arrival in Milan with a series of short films exploring their home city and its different development zones.

Nicolai Ouroussoff Tackles the Gender Debate for Women Architects
By  Alissa - November 2nd 2007
The question "Is there a glass cieling [sic] in architecture?" was not asked per se at "Women in Modernism," a panel held at MoMA last week, where architectural historian Gwendolyn Wright (and Modernist junkie) led a discussion about women who have had an impact on Modernism....

How To Hide An Airplane Factory
By Bradley - November 1st 2007
During World War II the Army Corps of Engineers needed to hide the Lockheed Burbank Aircraft Plant to protect it from a Japanese air attack. They covered it with camouflage netting and trompe l’oeil to make it look like a rural subdivision from the air....

HOUSE kn by Kochi Architect's Studio
By John Commoner - November 1st 2007
Another Japanese wonder, HOUSE kn by Kochi Architect's Studio. Beautiful [sigh]. The floor plan is very nice and the outdoor space is wonderful....

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 June 2008 01:48