August 08 Blog Articles - Page 14 Print E-mail
Thursday, 31 July 2008 19:00

l Keeps to Playground Design Plans
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
An interesting piece from the Wall Street Journal about an alteration of career plans for famous theatrical/building designer, David Rockwell. Known for his work building backdrops for big name Broadway shows and even serving as the lead architect for the theaters themselves (he designed and built the Kodak Theater in LA), he's recently decided that he's still very into the playground designing market (for kids, specifically), the first of which should be completed sometime within the next year in NY. All this in the name of making urban life a little more kid-friendly and kid-encouraging.

Frieze Harley-Davidson Gets LEED Gold
Preston D K in Jetson Green
We're seeing all sorts of companies going for LEED Certification, and the most macho of motorcycle manufacturers is no different.  Just recently, the USGBC announced that the Frieze Harley-Davidson Dealership in O'Fallon, Illinois has been LEED Certified at the Gold level.  It's the first, LEED Harley-Davidson dealership in the Nation.  The 33,000 sf dealership was sustainably designed and built with ICFs with an R-value of forty.  Plus, with over forty Solatubes and all the various green elements that led to a credible Gold certification, it's also partially powered by a wind turbine.

Fish Works
Alexander Trevi in Pruned
On view till 27 September 2008 at Center for Architecture in New York are select entries from the South Street Seaport - Re-envisioning the Urban Edge competition. Unfortunately, no images are provided. Thankfully, N.E.E.D., whose entry was awarded First Place, provided us with images of their winning proposal: “an aquaculture-driven floating park, inlaid with combinational modules of public indoor programs.”

Mapping the World's Renewable Energy Potential
Sarah Kuck in WorldChanging
Yesterday, 4:21 PM
As renewable energy technologies become more competitive, investing in them is becoming a more viable venture. Yet, uncertainties about cost and ROI are still keeping some investors at bay. Wind blows, rain falls and the sun shines, but differently at different times and locations, making wind, hydroelectric and solar power dependent upon weather and climate systems. A new Northwest-based energy efficiency company, 3TIER, is using their science skills and computer smarts to remove some of that guesswork. Over 90 percent of the renewable energies used for electricity generation are weather-driven; in other words, they are completely dependent on the weather/climate system for their fuel. So while these sources of renewable energy have the capability to liberate us from our dependence on fossil fuels, they introduce another complicating dependency: the weather. This dependency affects all aspects of weather-driven renewable energy projects: from proper placement to ongoing operation and integration.

The Church of the Holy Cross / KHR
Nico Saieh in Arch Daily
The church of the holy cross was conceived as part of the landscape around Jyllinge. With its glass façade facing the fjord and a “fishing net” dividing the space of the church, the design clearly takes the history of the place seriously.

ZGF and Gerding/Edlen vie with Cesar Pelli and Houston developer for San Diego city hall comission
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Yesterday, 2:57 PM
 Gerding Edlen Development and Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership have been shortlisted for a new multi-block city hall project in San Diego, as previously reported by the Daily Journal of Commerce's Sam Bennett. The Portland team is a co-finalist with Houston developer Hines and its architect, Cesar Pelli. Although Pelli is a better known name nationally/internationally than ZGF, the Gerding/ZGF proposal is significantly more ambitious than Pelli's plan with Hines.

Casa angosta, cunningham architects
lavardera in materialicious
From the architect’s web site: Located on a narrow wooded site flanked by a creek and a railroad track you would not guess you were in the North Dallas suburbs. Accessed by a 250-foot long drive from the street, this 4300 sf house and pool stretch the remaining length of the property. An elongated plan allows for multi-directional views from each room of the house and appropriate climatic orientation. The first floor includes a brick garage and a glazed living area, separated by a decomposed granite motor court breezeway. These elements support the long Cor-ten steel clad second floor, including bedrooms, gallery, office, family room and utilities.

The Architects interview Bjarke Ingels
Marcus Trimble in Super Colossal
The always excellent (is there any architecture radio that rivals it?) RRR radio program The Architects interview Bjarke Ingels from BIG, complete with a wonderful story about A-R-M, copyright and photoshop filters.

Archinode
Young in Architecture
"A methodology new to buildings yet ancient to gardening is introduced in this design - pleaching. Pleaching is a method of weaving together tree branches to form living archways, lattices, or screens. The trunks of inosculate, or self-grafting, trees, such as Elm, Live Oak, and Dogwood, are the load-bearing structure, and the branches form a continuous lattice frame for the walls and roof. Weaved along the exterior is a dense protective layer of vines, interspersed with soil pockets and growing plants. Scaffolds, cut from 3D computer files control the plant growth in the early stages.

casa angosta, cunningham architects
lavardera in materialicious
From the architect’s web site: Located on a narrow wooded site flanked by a creek and a railroad track you would not guess you were in the North Dallas suburbs. Accessed by a 250-foot long drive from the street, this 4300 sf house and pool stretch the remaining length of the property. An elongated plan allows for multi-directional views from each room of the house and appropriate climatic orientation. The first floor includes a brick garage and a glazed living area, separated by a decomposed granite motor court breezeway. These elements support the long Cor-ten steel clad second floor, including bedrooms, gallery, office, family room and utilities.

Dellis Cay: Starchitects in the Turks & Caicos archipielago
Nico Saieh in Arch Daily
Super star architects arrive to the Caribbean, specifically to Dellis Cay,  a 560-acre island at the Turks & Caicos archipielago. The project, set to be completed by 2010, will feature works by Shigeru Ban, David Chipperfield, Carl Ettensperger, Zaha Hadid, Kengo Kuma, Piero Lissoni, and Chad Oppenheim. In addition to the 124 villas and 154 residences, the island will have a 30,000 sq ft Spa operated by the Mandarin Oriental, a five star luxury hotel, a signature restaurant and numerous casual dining experiences.

Skylab tower cuts 18 stories (but still looks great)
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
As Mike Thelin previously reported on his Burnside Blog for Portland Spaces, Skylab Design has unveiled a redesigned version of its proposed 27-story office and condo tower at West Burnside and 13th that is only 18 stories. As you can surely guess, the down-turned condo market is to blame. But now it will be a nine-story office building with ground-floor retail. Even so, the look remains dramatic, with an angular and jewel like facade of metal and glass.

Biggles in the 21st Century
owen hatherley in sit down man, you're a bloody tragedy
Historical regression corner: I live about a mile, as the crow flies, from the Excel centre. This is a strange place on the Royal Docks which seemingly holds only arms fairs and generally militaristic shindigs - gunboats and attack planes a particular specialty. Lately, the air above my flat has been filled with biplanes diving, swooping and generally re-enacting the Battle of Britain. Perhaps this is because I was reading 'Cato's Guilty Men at the time (a very topical thing, with chapter titles like 'Mr Brown Not Yet Unemployed' - I look forward to something as scurrilous about Thatcher-Blair as this is about Baldwin-MacDonald, one day), but it was really very unnerving. Shouldn't we be sheltering in the tunnel at Westcombe Park until they go away?

City of Silk Rail Network to Link Middle East & China
Ali Kriscenski in Inhabitat
A massive urban masterplan has been approved for Madinat al-Hareer, or City of Silk, in Subiya, Kuwait. With a budget of £66 billion ($132bn USD), the project is an ambitious endeavor that will provide a rail network between major Middle East cities and China. Kuwait, Damascus, Baghdad, and Iran are all along the intended railway route, which will link these cities to Israel and China. Boasting a new tower that will become the world’s tallest, the design for City of Silk will also include numerous recreation and business attractions, including a National Wildlife Sanctuary.

Bowery Livin'
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Yesterday, 7:00 PM
The current Architect's Newspaper chronicles the latest developments in the five boroughs, presenting a helpful, all-in-one-place snapshot of notable -- and not so notable -- residential projects. One of the projects that stood out is 52E4, designed by Scarano Architects and located at the corner of the Bowery and East 4th Street. Living on the Bowery used to be less of choice and more of circumstance. The numerous flophouses and mission shelters have dwindled close to the number that one can only anticipate they will soon be: zero. These, and almost certainly the light and kitchen supply stores below Houston Street, are slowly giving way to places for the middle and upper classes, be it museums or condo developments, the latter in which 52E4 falls.


Last Updated on Sunday, 14 September 2008 17:21
 
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