August 08 Blog Articles - Page 16 Print E-mail
Thursday, 31 July 2008 19:00

August 1st and 2nd

bert pepler, south africa
lavardera in materialicious
I found a showing of this architect, Bert Pepler, on the PushPullBar community. There is not a great deal of information about him there but I found this house very interesting. Set in the hills around Cape Town, if somebody had told me this was Los Angeles I would not have blinked.

Raumlabor - Küchenmonument
Merten Nefs in Projetos Urbanos
Berlin-based studio Raumlabor designed an air blob that can be blown into a temporary space for eating and dancing at about every available spot in the city. The object has travelled between several points in Duisburg and Mülheim (Germany). In October the studio will realize an intervention on a vacant spot in New York.
The project was developed together with Plastique Fantastique, which is specialized in pneumatic spaces.

Gianni Botsford: Casa Kike
AMNP
Following up on yesterday’s take on living in a bookcase, we’ve got the recent Lubetkin Prize [RIBA] winning Casa Kike - designed by Gianni Botsford Architects. Located in Cahuita, Costa Rica, the home was built for a writer - and is meant to house 17,000 books [I bet there’s lots of pictures…]. Here’s RIBA’s description of the award: The Lubetkin Prize is named in honour of the Georgia-born architect, who worked in Paris before coming to London in the 1930s to establish the influential Tecton Group. It is awarded for the most outstanding building outside the EU by an RIBA member and is chosen from winners of RIBA International Awards| following visits by a jury of architects and a lay judge.

First Look at West Coast Green Container Showhouse 2008
Preston D K in Jetson Green
For the past two years, we've been media sponsors for the always excellent West Coast Green conference.  WCG pushes the envelope on innovation and sustainability, and this year will be no different.  Today I received renderings of the West Coast Green Showhouse, aka the SG Blocks 2008 Showhouse, built by SG Blocks and designed by The Lawrence Group.  It's a 1700 sf container home, but you probably can't tell just by looking.  Sustainability will be number one, with GreenPoint and LEED certification in the plans.  Plus, it seems that ecofabulous will be doing the interior design work, so the home, you can believe, will be modish, posh, and green.

The ITER Complex: A Gorgeous Green Enclave
Mike Chino in Inhabitat
Juan Herreros Architects designed this gorgeous green complex to seamlessly integrate into the sweeping undergrowth of a forest bustling with biological activity. The verdant structure features an elongated low-profile layout to help it blend in with the treetops, situating it as “a new species that respects, protects and enhances the forest”. An excellent example of low-impact green architecture, the design recently took second place in an international competition to design a new building for the CEA Cadarache Research Center.

The Psychiatric Infrastructure of the City
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
A few years ago, the Boston Globe looked at what could be called the psychiatric impact of that city's Big Dig. The Big Dig was a massively expensive urban engineering project that put Boston's Central Artery underground, freeing up space on the earth's surface for parks and businesses. The project, however, was plagued with engineering difficulties, cost over-runs, and the periodic collapse of public support (even the periodic collapse of the ceiling).
From the Globe:
In the short term, mental health experts say, tempers may flare as the public deals with the logistical inconvenience of detours, lingering uncertainty about the safety of the tunnels, and mounting cynicism about the project. (...) And there may be long-term effects as well – ones that could subtly reshape the city's identity.

ZAHA HADID’s Mobile Art Pavilion for Chanel or Central Park?
Abigail Doan in Inhabitat
It used to be that Manhattan’s Central Park was reserved for leisurely Sunday strolls, ultimate Frisbee on the Great Lawn, and narrated carriage rides for out-of-towners. There was a policy to keep public art works out of the park proper leaving public spectacles to be reserved for ‘New Yorkers just being New Yorkers’ and the odd impromptu performance. Ever since Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s saffron-bedecked The Gates and now Olafur Eliasson’s Waterfalls, it seems as if the city is looking for creative ways to build up its financial reserves. We are not sure if Zaha Hadid’s latest Mobile Art pavilion (created as an homage to Chanel’s classic handbag) is the best way for the Central Park Conservancy to boost its programs and plantings, but in this new era of ‘bread and circus’ art and life on the verge of recession, who is really going to fight a posh take on an old classic?


 

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