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August 08 Blog Articles - Page 4 Print E-mail
Thursday, 31 July 2008 19:00

Decolonizing Architecture
Merten Nefs in Projetos Urbanos
“The project Decolonizing Architecture, directed by architects Sandi Hilal, Alessandro Petti and Eyal Weizman and located in Bethlehem/Palestine, is dealing with a complicated architectural problem: How to deal with the future remnants of Israeli colonial Architecture – colonies and military camps – at a time these would be unplugged from the architectural political power of Israel’s regime of occupation.” www.decolonizing.ps Instead of demolishing the evacuated Israeli colonies, the project proposes the transformation of the abandoned structures for different future use. An ungrounding strategy is suggested, meaning the demolishing of only the surface infrastructural occupations, leaving the houses as isolated pavilions in a new continuous, natural and collective context. Reuse and connection of existing buildings are studied, as well as flooding of certain areas.

ML Museum Liaunig
Frame Magazine
On August 29th, the ML Museum Liaunig, designed by Querkraft, will be officially open.  This museum is placed out over steep-sided ground, placed rather high up in the landscape. However, only a small part of the outstretched building is visible from the hills. The museum also cantilevers thirty meters out, over a steep bank towards the approach road; just image driving on that road. The entrance is orientated toward the centre of Neuhaus (Austria) and the nearby historical castle. The storage depot is one of the main areas of the museum, which stretches out through the entire length of the gently sloping approach. When entering the main exhibition hall, visitors are accompanied by a ‘wine cellar of art’; an underground volume that offers the possibility to organize several exhibitions (thanks to flexible screens and lighting arrangements).

Explora Hotel in Atacama / German del Sol
Nico Saieh in Arch Daily
San Pedro de Atacama is a 34,000 acres cultivated oasis, inhabited for more than two thousand years, in dispersed neighborhoods called Ayllus. The colonial town was founded instead, by the Spanish conquerors, as a square grid of long streets around the main square. The hotel takes some distance from existing settlements, to found a new town in Atacama.

Big One in the Big Apple
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
According to a newly published report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, New York City is more at risk from earthquakes than previously thought. What's interesting here, though, is not some disaster film scenario in which the city is shuddered into a rubble of broken bricks and glass, but the fact that the land around Manhattan is actually an "intricate labyrinth of old faults, sutures and zones of weakness caused by past collisions and rifting," as PhysOrg.com describes it.
Amazingly, for anyone who has ever studied architecture, they even describe "unseen but potentially powerful structures whose layout and dynamics are only now coming clearer." Gilles Deleuze must be rolling in his grave.

3000 Broadway
Brendan in Where
Sure, all major cities look big and dense at their cores. But how do they compare a bit further out? Where's got some (admittedly loose) comparative urbanism for ya's today: aerial images of the address 3000 Broadway in America's nine largest cities -- #10 San Jose has no like-named street. (For the record: Philly's is from 3000 Broad Street, and Dallas' is from 3000 Broadway in the suburb of Garland, since the address does not exist in The Big D proper).

McGill University’s new life sciences buildings
Cédric Sam in Spacing Montreal
In a past life, I was a university student in biochemistry at McGill University. Toward the end of my degree, there were talks that entrepreneur and scientist Dr. Francesco Bellini (who played a big role in Biochem Pharma, the maker of 3TC, an important drug for treating HIV) would give money to build a brand-new biological research centre at McGill University. The year was 2002.


Last Updated on Sunday, 14 September 2008 17:21
 
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