January '08 - Blog Articles - Page 7 Print E-mail
Monday, 31 December 2007 19:00

January 14th, 2008

Is LEED Green Enough?
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
I'm a bit embarrassed to admit that I'm not yet LEED certified... I keep meaning to take the test, but after finishing the AREs, I'm frankly not all that interested in studying. Besides my lack of motivation for studying in general, I'm just not very motivated to take the exam because I'm not completely convinced of its merits. I consider myself a fairly green person, and try to design green whenever my job allows it (which I must admit is not as often as I'd like), so I've never really understood how LEED would or could help me in my work.

Half Dose #41: Hungerburgbahn
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
While I try not to feature projects by the likes of Zaha Hadid, who have every completed project published in print and online, this funicular station in Innsbruck, Austria by the Pritzker Prize winner caught my eye enough that I decided to feature it. Actually comprised of four stations, the just over 1 mile (1.8km) long Nordpark Cable Railway (Hungerbergbahn) connects the center of Innsbruck, Alpenzoo (the world's highest zoo) and, naturally, a mountaintop ski resort.

We Love To Build
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
The We Love To Build series, by British designer Paul Hollingworth, is an act of genius. The above image, in its original size, is ridiculously good. That hovering corner, detached but connected to guy-wires, is weirdly mesmerizing – and the slotted drawers, whole pieces of the building sliding in and out as if on hidden railers, add such an incredible sense of weight and dynamism, I'd almost like to see this structure built. But only as long as parts of it drift upward, attached to cabling...

two houses in maine, sheila narusawa
Justin in materialicious

Ecolect and NAU Event in Chicago this Friday!
Emily in Inhabitat
We love NAU and we love Ecolect (one of our recent holiday party cohosts). So it’s natural that we’re wishing we were in the Midwest for the Ecolect “3rd Coast” launch party at the NAU store in Chicago.

Traveling Without Moving
Chris in Brand Avenue
New York City's Lower East Side--the storied, once forlorn corner of the city turned crossroads of cultural production and wellspring of "cool"--is now brought into extreme proximity via the virtual transportation capabilities of the Internet. Rather than visiting the neighborhood in person, imbibe the local ambience via the MMOPRG Virtual Lower East Side online instead. The world of VLES...is an idealized, Smurf Village reduction of the real Lower East Side, and yet instantly recognizable to anyone who’s logged more hours at Pianos than he cares to admit or ducked out to Rosario’s Pizza for a late-night slice....

The Right Choice to finds a lots of House and Flats offers in Edinburgh
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
Welcomehome.co.uk will be the right choice for you it you are planning to buy or rent some house or flats offers in United Kingdom ( UK ), At there you can finds lots of house and flats offers so easily with an uptodate news and property guidance that can help you finding your best property deal in UK. For the beginning, after viewing their main page, you can start looking some flats to buy in Edinburgh and finds a lots of flats offers in edinburgh with an interactive map, area reviews, and a detailed table of information about property prices that can help you finding the best property offers to buy there.

Bloch Wins Awards
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Not surprisingly, Steven Holl's Bloch Building addition to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri wins an 2008 AIA Honor Award for Architecture [PDF link]. Of course, not everybody's thinks that award is what the addition should receive...

January 11th, 2008

Treehouse of Steven Isaacs and Lisa
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This treehouse project that was designed for Steven Isaacs and Lisa Saville residence is an architectural home office that has an environmentally sensitive in design, with no tree cutting during the construction, and each three- to four-bedroom property was built on eight steel piers, or supports, so the building "touched the earth lightly". This treehouse include eco-smart elements in design such as the application of home's elegant butterfly roof that creates and provides shade, draws in morning light and channels rainwater into 9000-litre water tanks.

Wired, Backstories and the Winnowing of Green Media
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Chris Anderson, of Wired, made some bold claims the other day. He looked at Wired's activities, and claimed that it was more sustainable to publish on paper than on the web, and that, in effect, paper publication was a carbon sequestration project. Here's his argument: 1. Trees take carbon out the air. Carbon negative 2. Sustainable forestry companies (the only kind we use) cut down those trees, and plant an equal number to replace them (trees absorb the most carbon in the young, high-growth period of their life. Update: see comments for more on this)....

How Do We Share Design Innovation in Cities?
WorldChanging Team in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
By Justus Stewart
To walk down the streets of a major US city is to experience the impacts of decades of bad design, in streets and sidewalks, in architecture, in density and use of space. . I do not use the word design as some subjective stand-in for ‘what I like’ (though aesthetics are a valid basis for criticism); I mean design for the future, design for human beings. Our cities are designed with an overwhelming bias towards the needs of automobiles, rather than people.

What do you no longer believe? What do you now believe?
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
John Brockman has a new question: What have you changed your mind about? Why? Here are some interesting answers: LAURENCE C. SMITH. Professor of Geography, UCLA [The Impossibility of] Rapid climate change
The year 2007 marked three memorable events in climate science: Release of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ...

Intriguing Earth Architecture 39
Bradley in east coast Architecture review
Zollverein School of Design, Essen, Germany - SANAA

Cubion Office by Jackie Bertelsen
Frame Magazine
Friday, 10:31 AM
Jackie Bertelsen gave the interior of the [link=http://www.cubion.dk]Cubion[/link] office in Copenhagen a calm and creative atmosphere.  Read more…

I went to the car park because I wished to live deliberately
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
"By the end of January," The Scotsman writes, "it's essential to be back in Edinburgh... where Nicholas Bone's intriguing performance company Magnetic North stages a version of Henry Thoreau's Walden, one of the most famous essays ever written on the idea of self-sufficiency and human harmony with nature." The set has been designed by Sans Façon. What blows me away, though, is the suggestion, in the image, above, that one could build a kind of personal retreat in the middle of an underground car park. You're fed up. You want to be alone, to spend some time getting to know your own inner tendencies, how you react to things free from the influence of others...

The [new] Rural Studio: Hale County Animal Shelter…done
architecture.MNP
I have been an admirer of the work of the Rural Studio from the time I learned about their work as a tike in school. The architecture developed within the walls of the studio incorporates a certain visual appeal while providing practicality in use. Since the programs early beginnings under the late architectural patriarch Samuel ‘Sambo’ Mockbee, the scope of the program [as well as my interest in what they do] has not diminished a bit.

PREFAB FRIDAY: ‘Watershed’ Sustainable Writer’s Retreat
Ali in Inhabitat
It’s easy to see how inspiration takes hold in ‘Watershed’ - a 100 square foot writer’s retreat in Oregon that is as sustainable as it is engaging. Commissioned by a well-known nature writer and designed by FLOAT architectural research and design, this small-scale project fulfills its intention of revealing the surrounding ecology while allowing observation without disturbance. Completely recyclable and constructed with an ultra-light footprint, ‘Watershed’ does well by its name.

Endgame for One of Chicago's Great Public Places?
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
The Chicago Daily News Building, Holabird and Root's elegant Art Deco skyscraper from 1929, was the first building constructed over railroad air rights. With its broad graceful plaza, it was the first project not to turn its back on the Chicago River, but to embrace it. Now the Daily News Building is threatened with being cast in the shadows, and its great plaza destroyed, by a new office tower reportedly being considered by billionaire developer Sam Zell. Read all about the building's history, endangered present, and future potential, here.

Troika by Norman Foster with GDP architects
Young in Architecture
I recalled my ex-colleague (from GDP) showing me the plans of this project while I was working with something similar 2years ago. Architecture is not always as fun as it seems to be at times. We need to fulfill the plot ratio requirement and make up something special as selling point. Troika is a luxury with a free plan; random composition of vertical elements and horizontal concrete slabs; the contrast of materials between transparent glazing and solid concrete and the symphony of lights at night just makes it fun and lovely to see. There is an interesting video clip in http://www.troika.com.my/ "The residential Troika Development is located at the north-eastern corner of Kuala Lumpur City Centre Park, with comprehensive views of the Park and Petronas Towers. The Foster design responds to the unique location with a scheme of three residential towers - of 38, 44, and 50 storeys respectively - that will be the tallest residential development in Malaysia. "

Two2Read
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Why Foster’s Hearst Tower is no gherkin. Early last year I panned Hearst Tower in a Gridskipper compilation of the ugliest buildings in New York. Many of you disagreed with me (some strongly), so it was refreshing to see Robert Campbell take a stab at critiquing the design's faults. The Boston Globe critic asserts some of the same things I found disturbing about Lord Foster's diagrid tower, namely process over program and context, though he does it at length and more articulately.
Marcella Durand on the Infinite Library
"New York-based poet Marcella Durand on a dream of hers that begins with 18th century French architect Etienne-Louis Boullée, weaves through Borges, and emerges in the unknowable future of the infinite library", where "many books are infinitely preferable to one." One for the bibliophile in me...and you.



Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 June 2008 01:48
 
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