January '08 - Blog Articles Print
Monday, 31 December 2007 19:00

We select here the best Articles relating to Architecture that we find around the blogosphere. Written by smart insightful bloggers, these articles are quite pleasant to read. We hope that you will enjoy them. 

If you want to recommend a blog or a web site, email its URL to us and we will evaluate it.

 


Humanur Bagli and panel on Legacy of Gordon Matta-Clark this weekend
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Yeah, I'm behind in getting the monthly calendar up again. (It's a lot of work, ok, and the dog ate my keyboard.) So here's the listings for the first weekend in February. Humanur Bagli at UIC - 11:30 A.M., Friday, February 1st, at the City Design Conference Room, 820 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 330, UIC. A presentation and discussion from the City Design Center by the visiting scholar from Istanbul, Turkey. Dr. Bagli will discuss her experiences as a designer and design consultant in Turkey. Her work has included many interdisciplinary projects with international and NGOs which illustrate the role of the designer as a socially responsible agent. Information here.

All about the Roof
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
Australian firm Stutchbury and Pape has created some great projects all with a consistent theme... the roof is the most important plane, delicately balanced on the structure below. Simple, clear, and lovely. Its interesting to see this firm developing and redeveloping the same concepts and schemes and to see how these themes change with time and scope...

 

January 31st, 2008


Book Series of the Moment
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Many book series that try to boil down complex ideas, facts, and knowledge into slim volumes end up calling the reader a beginner, a dummy, or worse, an idiot. Well, the fine folks at Routledge call their audience for these books just what they are: architects; as well as what they're apparently not: thinkers. To remedy this the Thinkers for Architects Series "offers quick, clear and accurate introductions to key thinkers who have written about architecture and whose work can yield insights for designers."

Preview of Eyebeam Eco-Vis Challenge finalists
Regine Debatty in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Michael Mandiberg and Brooke Singer are two wizards of eco-data visualization. Eyebeam alum. Brooke Singer is behind Area´s Immediate Reading and the Superfund 365, A Site-A-Day. Superfund 365 is probably my favourite project from 2007. Each day for a year, this online data visualization application visits one toxic site active in the Superfund program run by the U.S. The contaminant, the responsible party and the people involved with or impacted by Superfund are represented in the project.

Can Carbon Markets Keep the Planet from Heating Up?
WorldChanging Team in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Growing interest among national and regional governments in curbing carbon emissions has led to rapid expansion of the global carbon market. Policymakers worldwide are recognizing the true costs of carbon emissions for our economy and our environment. These markets could not have taken off without strong policy leadership. But while many U.S. states are taking action, the national government is falling notably behind by not setting a national cap on carbon emissions.

The Big Picture
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Yesterday, 10:18 PM
Jamais has a great piece up on the wider forces crafting our future: Climate Chaos: Twenty years is the outside limit of how long we have to make the global changes (in our energy grids, urban designs, transportation networks, agricultural processes, industrial processes, taxation policies, trade policies, etc.) required to avoid real disaster. It's also probably about right for figuring out which geoengineering strategies are the least likely to make things worse. We know what we need to do -- we simply need to do it.
holiday house in the alps, afgh
Justin in materialicious
Holiday House in Scheidegg, Switzerland. Size: 242 m². Built: 2002-2003.
I blogged another project a while back by Andreas Fuhrimann and Gabrielle Hächler (click the button for English), a renovation of an old Alpine Hut. These folks are gooooood. The views from this house are incredible, and the architects’ site has larger versions of the photos posted here, plus some great panoramic shots as well.

AIA's Latest Economic Survey Now Online
ASLA.org - The Dirt
Our friends at AIArchitect, the news publication of the AIA, have released their findings of their latest economic survey. The news? In the face of a troubled US economy and with factors like $100 barrels of oil and lowering consumer confidence clouding the horizon, it is difficult to imagine that the growth in construction that firms have enjoyed in the past six years will continue unabated. However, the survey notes that the industry is entering 2008 with "a lot of momentum."

Maison & Objet Paris 2008: Furniture
sabine7 in MoCo Loco
Out of the furniture offerings at Maison & Objet, we were most attracted by all manner of chair, especially the upholstery on the pieces by the Ateliers Philippe Coudray and the cosy knitted merino poufs and throws by Casalis, like little ottoman sweaters. Nicky D Essentials had some great group seating and Swala Line ‘s pieces varied between smooth and textured. Kenneth Cobonpue made a showing and Massant had a wide range of patterns to present, while the Crassevig chair came in different colours and finishes.

The Slat House | Private Residence | By Turner Castle
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
The Flat House is a building Extension and refurbishment project that was designed by Turner in Blackheath, London. Expansion of a small semi-detached house on a large piece of land in Blackheath. The modular expansion wood wraps around the side of the semi-detached house, it peeps through the adjacent trees in the back garden and offers access to the terrace.

Entangling the Green Building Standards
Sarah Nagy in Green Options
LEED-H. FGBC. Energy Star. HERS. Fortified Home. EarthCraft. These are all names of green building standards used around the country for homes. And now NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) is due to unveil its own Green Building Standard at the upcoming International Building Show in Orlando, Feb 13-16.

Diagnosing Slum
Bryan Finoki in Subtopia
I recently posted this to Archinect but in case you missed it I am posting it here, too. Lebbeus Woods is continuing the conversation we had here in this thread over at his own blog with an excellent post surmising the geo-economic conditions that produce “slums.” Particularly striking to me was this statement: There is much that is admirable in the way that slum dwellers struggle against overwhelming adversity, but admiration must be tempered by the realization that they do not struggle because they choose to, out of principle, or in the service of high social or political ideals, but because of their desperation at the brutal limits of survival. It is a mistake—and a grave disservice to them—to imagine that their ingenuity, resourcefulness, and capacities for self-organization can in any way serve as models for our present global society. To believe so would be to endorse the dog-eat-dog ethics that rule their lives and, all too often, those occupying society’s more economically advantaged classes.

January 30th, 2008

New look for the Ritz-Carlton
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
The Ritz-Carlton Hotel, one of Sherbrooke Street’s most recognizable landmarks, will soon be transformed with a $100 million renovation and expansion. Over the next two years, the number of hotel rooms will be reduced and new condominium units added in an effort to modernize the hotel’s offering. What might interest Montrealers, however, are the changes planned for the hotel’s exterior, which will include the construction of a new glass wing on the building’s west side as well as the addition of two floors to its roof.

France v Britain: Who has the best ironmongery?
Crompton in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
Locks in Musée Marmaton, Paris and a Northamptonshire cottage compared: precision gilded case and too cheap to have a case. Tags: cia, locks, ironmongery

Hubbell & Benes auditorium renovation completed at Shaker Heights High School
Steven Litt/Plain Dealer Architecture Critic in Architecture and the Urban Landscape with The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt
City Architecture An in-progress shot shows Shaker High's auditorium on the way to Saturday's reopening celebration. Shaker Heights takes historic preservation seriously. Example: At 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Shaker Heights High School will celebrate the completion of a $2.4 million renovation...

casa 89, h arquitectes
Justin in materialicious
Casa 89, L’Ametlla del Vallès, Catalunya, Spain. Built: 2002-2005. I like this house by H Arquitectes - it’s a good example of how the firm dealt with designing for and building on a problematic site on a hillside. Plus, it just plain looks cool. Love those slats……

Architect Robert Corna surprised that partner Doug Price wants fresh talent for tower
Steven Litt/Plain Dealer Architecture Critic in Architecture and the Urban Landscape with The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt
Cleveland architect Robert Corna was taken aback today when asked to comment about statements by his development partner, Doug Price III, who said it was "not a foregone conclusion" that Corna would design a new office tower as part of...

Bear Fights Lumberjack At Brooklyn Architectural Smackdown
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Architecture was fun for one night as LVHRD's ARCH DL IV pitted two teams of architects against each other in a live one-night mystery challenge. Last night's brief: Build an Alaskan Wildlife Research Facility using drinking straws - a...

spirit of place: students go global
Justin in materialicious
Eight-and-a-half days is barely enough time for most people to get over jet lag when traveling, but for a group of nine students from Catholic University in Washington, D.C., it’s a period of intense work in far-flung locations such as Nepal, Machu Pichu, or Ireland. Through a program called Spirit of Place/Spirit of Design, taught by architect Travis Price, the students come to these exotic settings ready to build a project they’ve spent the spring semester designing. The small structure they erect—whether a temple, a pilgrimage shelter, a sweat lodge, or an outhouse—does not just add to the startling beauty of its locale; it taps into and expresses the location’s culture through architecture’s symbolism. Read the article and interview by Diana Lind and see the slideshow at Architectural Record Online. Photos courtesy Spirit of Place.

glass house in christiania
Justin in materialicious
Christiania, Glass House, at the ever fascinating blog AdaptiveReuse.net, via Schwarz. See the Flickr slideshow and Wikipedia’s Christiania entry.

Design Green Project Announces Award Winners
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
It's awards season, and while there remains a paucity of events at which paparazzi-trailed designers, architects, photographers, and other creative types walk the red carpet (the precise red sponsored by Pantone, the carpet itself by Chilewich) and pick up...

liberty collection, recycled glass mosaic tile
Justin in materialicious
Trendgroup USA announces the launch the new handmade transparent glass tile collection, Liberty. It was designed by the Italian mosaicist Giulio Candussio and contains a minimum 25% post consumer recycled glass. It is available in 12 colorways for around $45 psf. Soon to be available at retailers everywhere, you can already get it at Stone Source (see more Trend products at their site). The green Morris colorway above was photographed by Arnaldo dal Bosco. It is a detail of the Neptune Throne Room at CASADECOR Miami by Doug and Gene Meyer.

Eye Candy: Mickey D’s
architecture.MNP
This week’s Eye Candy is a follow-up to a post from last week - ‘World’s Nicest KFC?‘. Some comments were left about McDonald’s, 9th Dan of fast food food chains, and then we received an email from our ninja Eric over at Eye Candy with some images and links showing off a number of fancy Mickey D’s designs. In order to avoid my ranting, I’ve decided NOT to comment at length on McDonald’s impact on the built environment. Really, you’d just think that something based on simplicity, coast effectiveness and mas production would come up with some kind of kick-ass streamlined prefab [not shitty 1970’s looking brick]. Plus, those giant yellow arches should lead to some serious craziness [and these 1950’s era throwback diners aren’t what I’m talking about].

Narrative Infrastructures
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
For those of you in Los Angeles, 1) consider kidnapping me and driving me back there in a van full of architecture books and coffee, because I can't even believe how much I miss that place, and 2) consider stopping by the Apple Store tonight in Santa Monica to hear Tali Krakowsky, Director of Experience Design at Imaginary Forces, speak about "trends in the fusion of design, technology and architecture." It's the narrative infrastructure of built space: Transformations in design thinking, inspired by emerging technologies and a fascination with storytelling, are changing the entertainment, educational, corporate and retail environments of the 21st Century. In her session, Krakowsky will break down interactive environments into their components: re-imagining content in motion, re-imagining media delivery systems, and re-imagining smart, interactive spaces, [to] examine several key projects in terms of process and design methodology.

Sustainability and the Unimaginable City
Brendan in Where
A recent post at WorldChanging offered up for discussion a fantastic Bruce Sterling quote about sustainability: "The ruins of the unsustainable are the 21st century's frontier." That's a pretty profound statement. To think that the world around us, the things that we consider familiar and take for granted, will be to our great grandchildren what the Roman Aqueducts -- or even British colonial forts -- are to us: relics. Of course, much of our built environment (especially the unsustainable portions) are considerably less visually appealing than crumbling arches and turrets....

Architect Peter Eisenman: The New England Patriots Worst Nightmare?
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
While we were in Glendale a couple months back, checking out Pentagram's work at the Cardinals' stadium, we're thinking now that we should have also been looking for top secret chambers and valves and mysterious contraptions of all kinds....

Private Residential Refurbishment project on Opal House by Turner Castle
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This is the private residential refurbishment project on Opal House that was design and constructed by Turner Castle. Located in Primrose Hill, North London. This is the remodelling project of a 4-storey semi-detached Opal House. Open plan levels with a dramatic cantilevered side stair provide a more fluid and contemporary arrangement than the original Victorian cellular rooms with central stair. The main entertaining room is located in the double height lower ground floor that has an access to the rear garden.

Public Hearing tonight - Future of Fort Dearborn P.O. Site: Park or Megadevelopment?
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
According to a report in Crain's Chicago Business, the Postal Service, in the words of a quoted spokesman, is "beginning the process of exploring the options for leveraging the value of that property", that property being the Fort Dearborn Station post office facility, which takes up a full city block at Dearborn and Grand (and Clark and Ohio). One of the features of the Chicago Central Area Plan issued in 2002 was to turn that block into a public park. That was before the heavy densification of River North had reached full flower, and last year's destruction of the areas only park space, the private park south of the AMA Building.

Reliance in Photos
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
This past fall, ArcSpace editor Kirsten Kiser made a pilgrimage to Chicago to check out the city's progress, and posted this excellent article on Burnham, Atwood and Shankland's 1895 Reliance Building, and its reincarnation in 1999 as the Hotel Burnham, beautifully restored by Antunovich Associates and Gunny Harboe, when he was at McClier. There's a wealth of both historic and new photographs, both exterior and interior. An added bonus are more photo's of Kiser's visits to Millennium Park, the Spertus Center and IIT campus.


January 29th, 2008

Windy City to Get Icy Museum
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
That's right, dear reader, if you guessed that today's UnBeige Secret Word is "ice," you may have won a lifetime supply of Creamsicles! Not to be outdone by its neighbors to the North, Chicago is gearing up for their...

All Your Ecobase Are Belong To Us
Ecobase is another "green" building system out of Europe complete with its own greenwashing sales package: "Your house is also a lifestyle choice, your statement to the other. It expresses how and in what kind of environment you want to live. To live in EcoBase means to make a natural choice. To exist like a part of nature's cycle and state to the other that you are not indifferent to the environmental problems." Little green tips pop up on every page of the website. But it is made of logs. No mention of where they come from or whether they are sustainably harvested, and then they are treated with "antiseptics" and a fire retardant addi...

an elegant minimalist kitchen, daskal & laperre interior architects
Justin in materialicious
It’s Belgium Week over at Remodelista (wonderful stuff), and I thought I’d show this beautiful kitchen I’d bookmarked a while ago by the Belgian firm of Stéphanie Laperre & Daphné Daskal Interior Architects. It’s from the DW Residence in Brussels. You don’t see much of their work around the web, but have a look at the site. I call their work “Quiet Minimalism”. It’s all quite gorgeous.

AIA Announced Winners of Young Architects Awards
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Hot off their unveiling of the 2008 Honor Awards and then their announcement that they wanted to keep staying in the public consciousness as long as they possibly can, the American Institute of Architects has just released its recipients...

A beautiful and clean Memorial.
Ute Bauer in anArchitecture
source: left - DonGil magazine, right - Ute Bauer
Did Don Gil, a fashion chain for high earners, hire a location scout who suggested Vienna's Holocaust memorial to be the most suitable spot to present the autumn/winter collection?
Don Gil was looking for "a public site with a beautiful and clean appearance" - certainly it took several meetings and decision papers to finally result in more pros than cons for the setting....

Weekly Architecture Clips, Part 2,The Child, Alex Gopher.
Christoph, anArchitecture in anArchitecture
Alex Gopher (born Alex Latrobe) is a French record producer, DJ and musician. (source: wikipdeia) In 1999, the French production company has produced the impressive music video for his composition "The Child". It tells the story of couple rushing to hospital to give birth to their baby. The video is composed entirely of typographic elements...

Jasperia
Young in Architecture
My collegue like these stones so much and I think I need to keep a post over these material. The website's images are not attractive but with the lights on, the material glows, that is the interesting part. They even got pearl stone tiles~!
"Ovum Jasper Crystals & Stones offer a unique alternative to tradition finishing solutions such as marble, terazzo, mosaic and tiles. The pictures below show the Manufacturing Process of Ovum Jasper Crystals & Stones. "

Jetson Green: First LEED Gold Museum
architecture.MNP
Preston, green ninja master over at Jetson Green writes: …Grand Rapids’ latest claim to green fame is that it is now the home to the first new construction LEED-certified art museum in the country.
The building is a 125,000 sf structure designed by Kulapat Yantrasast of Workshop Hakomori Yantrasast (wHY Architects). The Grand Rapids Art Museum opened just a few weeks prior to David Adjaye’s Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, which is also expecting a LEED Gold.

My very own border outpost
Bryan Finoki in Subtopia
So, I made it back from another jaunt to the border, this time – my very own little border zone down south, of new places filled between San Diego and Tijuana, and I have to say – I really didn’t feel like coming back! Seriously, it was so nice down there. I had a ridiculously amazing time, so let me just say thanks to Catherine Herbst for inviting me, having me (I’m glad you thought I came across like an old pro!) how cool. And to Andrea Dietz, for taking such good care of me, setting me up, shuttling me around, and for setting me straight on my lack of history in regards to the precarious relationship architects have always shared with political power – much needed insight, and I will have to dive deeper before making future assertions about architects relationships with the clouds – so thanks again!

A Shelter Is Built Green, to Heal Inside and Out
OAKLAND, Calif. — Although he will not be moving from the dilapidated homeless shelter here for another week, Paul McClendon, 55, has his oversized baby-blue garbage bags packed. Sitting on his bed in a winter jacket, he talked Thursday about the new, so-called green shelter with the central heating that he will be moving into.

Maps, Maps, Maps For All
Brendan in Where
I had a friend over last weekend and we spent a good chunk of time tooling around several of my favorite map sites on the web (because that's what catrography geeks do for fun, you see). After revisiting the glories of Radical Cartography for the first time in months, I was pleasantly surprised to see the pop up in a recent post over at Tropolism. While Radical Cartography does indeed contain some of the most interesting maps on the interwebs, I thought it'd be fun to do a rundown of five of my other favorite sites featuring innovative cartography. Heck, I'll even let down this blog's hair a bit and put the links directly in the text of the post instead of at the bottom. Hot damn, are you excited yet?! I sure am. Let's get rolling.

How to Become a Famous Architect
admin in mirage.studio.7
I had a conversation with an architect last week and during the conversation he told me, “The fastest way to become a famous architect,” he said, “is to throw a brick at a famous architect.”
Advice taken.

January 28th, 2008

Ameritrust developer wants to hire Cleveland architect to design new downtown tower
Steven Litt/Plain Dealer Architecture Critic in Architecture and the Urban Landscape with The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt
K&D GroupDon't worry: Developer Doug Price said Monday he has no intention of building the crystalline glass mushroom shown in this rendering. He's going to aim higher and wants to give the assignment to a Cleveland architect. It was fantastic...

Paula Scher Says Get Rid of 'America' and Ditch the "Star Spangled Banner," But Keep the Flag
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Seeing as we just now got through the first, year-old, 3,400-page issue of Monocle, we realized there's no way we'll be able to catch up with the articles we want to pass along to you by actually reading the...

When Chinatown was a Jewish neighbourhood
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
Did you know that today’s Chinatown was once Jewish? From 1890 to 1920, thousands of Yiddish-speaking Jews came to Montreal from Eastern Europe and settled in the streets around St. Lawrence and Dorchester (now René Lévesque). In today’s Gazette, I take a close look at the evolution of this neighbourhood: If Chinatown’s Jewish heritage isn’t obvious, it’s probably because it has been erased by time and redevelopment, swept away like Chenneville St. ...

Philippe Starck Dismayed at Royalton Lobby Redesign
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Last week, designer Philippe Starck got a glimpse of the new Royalton hotel lobby (above), the $17.5 million Roman and Williams redesign of his beloved original, according to The New York Daily News. He was not impressed. According to...

bosworth hoedemaker architecture
Justin in materialicious
Bosworth Hoedemaker Architecture specializes in the design of finely-crafted custom houses in the Pacific Northwest, California and Mexico. The office provides planning, historic preservation, renovation and new construction services. Shown are three new builds.

Cloepfil Speaks
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
This Wednesday at noon, the University of Oregon's Portland architecture program continues its winter lecture series with a presentation by architect Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works. As you probably already know, Allied has produced a host of big, acclaimed, signature architecture projects around the US: the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, the Museum of Art & Design on Columbus Circle in New York, the Seattle Art Museum expansion, and of course Portland's fabulous Wieden + Kennedy 2281 Glisan buildings. On the flyer I received about the lecture, there was this quote from Aaron Betsky, who heads the Netherlands Architecture Institute in Rotterdam and helped select Cloepfil for the Museum of Art & Design job: “Cloepfil sees his work as continually pushing and pulling at the expectations we build based on our experiences. He hopes that his buildings do not so much ground us, as make us aware both of our own need for ground and the instability of such a notional center to our existence.”

house in the woods, eddy francois and caroline de wolf
Justin in materialicious
House in the Woods, somewhere in Belgium. Photographed by Sarah Blee Architectural Photography. The house itself is nice enough, but it’s the interiors that knock me out: the stone floors, that kitchen and the pool in the basement. Gorgeous. Visit Eddy Francois’ and Caroline de Wolf’s site for more.

mountain cabin, ps arkitektur
Justin in materialicious
Fjällhus (mountain cabin) in Northern Sweden, designed by PS Arkitektur. Dig the plywood interiors… Julie at Remodelista found this and also wrote a neat post called Steal This Look: Swedish Cabin, if you’d like to copy it. More photos after the jump and at the site.

The great nowhere at the edge
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
I'm back from London now to find the news cycle absolutely abuzz with so many interesting stories that it'll be hard to keep up – but I'll start posting the best of the best in a bit.
First, though, last week's lecture was a blast; I talked way too fast, of course, bungling several points in the process, but, in the main, I had a great time and can only hope that everyone who came out on a Wednesday night in London – including my father-in-law! – to hear perhaps a bit too much about geology and not enough about offshore structures, or about the colonial politics of naming alien territories, or about urban iterative architecture, had a good time, as well.
The Bartlett may or may not be uploading a film of the lecture at some point, meanwhile; until then, a few notes from the talk can be seen courtesy of Matt Jones and Mark Simpkins. Also, if you attended BLDGBLOG's recent lecture at SCI-Arc then you would have heard a lot of this before – but you would have missed out on instancing gates and billboard houses and the Indonesian mud volcano and China Miéville's "slow sculptures" and what I thought was a really fun Q&A.

Hubbard Street Asks Mies to Dance
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Meanwhile, here in Chicago, the big architectural event of the season happened yesterday at Mies van der Rohe's S.R. Crown Hall, as the Hubbard Street Dance company teamed up with the Illinois Institute of Technology to host a dance...

Japanese Home by TNA Architect
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This is the Japanese Architectural on House project by Makoto Takei and Chie Nabeshima (TNA) . The Japanese architect that was collecting many awards from their project in architectural design, such as their New Ring House Design that was awarded for Best Private House, in the Wallpaper Design Awards 2008.

Sou Fujimoto: House O
architecture.MNP
Designed by Sou Fujimoto Architects, House O is a weekend house for a couple - located on the coast, two hours from Tokyo. Built atop a rocky shoreline, the home is designed so as to appear to be part of the rocky terrain, with blank concrete walls rising from the rock outcroppings to meet the approaching visitor. This enclosed feeling changes immediately upon entering the house, which opens up almost entirely to the Pacific Ocean on the other side....

On the First Tour of Frank Lloyd Wright's La Miniatura in Sixteen Years
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday was a red letter day for fans of Frank Lloyd Wright. The heavy gates of his La Miniatura house were thrown open and guests were invited in to tour the place, built in Pasadena in the early 1920s...

The View House Design by Johnston Marklee
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
The View House is designed by Johnston Marklee, Was designed on a restricted site by fire and unstable geologic conditions. Limiting both the size and location of the structure in the landscape. Thedesign results from two site-driven demands : to maximize the size of the interior volume within the small footprint, while optimizing the views of the sorrounding territory. To capitalize on these extreme programmatic circumstances, the rotational flow of the house is defined by shaped interiorized and sculpted exterior forms.

Anti Smog Architecture: A Catalyst for Cleaner Air in Paris
Ali Kriscenski in Inhabitat
Architect Vincent Callebaut’s latest project balances public galleries, meeting rooms and gathering spaces over canals and abandoned railroad tracks in the 19th Parisian district. The prototype uses green technologies and techniques but is more than just an example of sustainable design. Callebaut’s ‘Anti Smog: An Innovation Centre in Sustainable Development’ is a catalyst for cleaner air.


 

January 27th and 26th, 2008

Simple, Elegant, and Compact
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
These simple folding drawer/shelf units are a quite elegant way to add storage, without adding bulk. The design by Shay Alkalay is beautiful as a stand alone object, but its also clever and useful!

Interaction and Choreography
Chris in Brand Avenue
Yesterday, 9:29 PM
In a moment where "interactivity" has become as ubiquitous and desirable as social networking and wi-fi, the design of an ambitious new public space in San Francisco expresses how ideas of interactivity can bear themselves out architecturally and urbanistically. Physical connectivity, material contrast, and consumer choice come to the fore, along with event planning and even furniture design: These clearings in the urban jungle point to what we can expect as the city grows; the best designs and spaces will be interactive in the way these plazas are, with new stores, arts and music venues and digital playgrounds. They are interactive in the simplest way - you walk through them. In addition, venues linked to them use technology to make it possible for visitors to personalize their experience, whether it is while looking at art or engaging with a history museum.

Cultural space to be built on Saint-Laurent metro
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
One of the more inexplicable vacant lots in town has been always been the one surrounding Saint-Laurent metro, at the corner of the Main and de Maisonneuve. You’d think that, being right on top of the metro and in such a central location, it would have been developed a long time ago. Well, that’s finally about to happen: forty years after it first came into being, this patch of empty space will finally make way for a new building. Earlier this week, the city announced that it has mandated the Société d’habitation et de développement de Montréal (SHDM) to build a new structure on top of the Saint-Laurent metro entrance. The new building will house commercial and cultural space, notably for LADMMI, Montreal’s school of contemporary dance. The city has not committed to funding the new development, however, which means that the SHDM will be forced to find somebody else to pay for it.

Financing Home 2.0
Jon Lebkowsky in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
While predatory lending practices in the mortgage industry have been getting a lot of press lately, there's a far more positive trend within the same industry: green mortgages. What do I know about finance? Though in these columns I focus on social media, I'm often in discussions about sustainability, and many of those focus on the built environment. I'm aware that big developers like Stratus here in Austin are completely serious about green buidling, and there are more and more LEED-certified construction projects in development, and various green building experts looking beyond LEED for better ways to ensure sustainable design and building....

Marina City In Its Cups
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Via the indispensible Marina City Online website comes this ad for the Chicago Convention and Tourism Bureau in which the twin towers of architect Bertrand Goldberg's iconic Marina City are rebuilt entirely out of a coffee cup resting atop each of twin 600-foot-high stacks of about 60 giant saucers. (or maybe they're just actual size serving platters from a Brazilian steakhouse.) It kinda gives you a feel for what Marina City might have looked like - minus the coffee cups - if it had been designed by Oscar Niemeyer. It's the first of a series of ads created for the bureau by Chicago ad firm Downtown Partners, run by a guy whose computer I used to take care of, founding partner Jim Schmidt. In a positive review, Chicago Sun-Times columnist Lewis Lazare reports that it's the first of six print executions, with others to tout the city's "ethnic diversity, its many festivals and its physical beauty, among other selling points." The Marina City ad seeks to underscore Chicago's claim to being "the culinary capital of America." I wonder if Ellis Levin tried to shake anybody down for royalties.

Ann Arbor Lighting Up With 100% LEDs!
Ali Kriscenski in Inhabitat
We haven’t been giving Ann Arbor, Michigan enough attention and the city deserves it! Last year Ann Arbor joined forces with LED manufacturer Cree, Inc, on an ever-expanding citywide LED initiative to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. With a recent retrofit contract signed with Lumecon, Ann Arbor is on its way to being the first U.S. city to light up its downtown with 100% LED technology!

Schmitz Country House Design by Felipe Assadi Architect, Calera Tango, Chile
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
Nice country house located in Calera Tango, Santiago, Chile is the house project for a marriage with no children that was done by Felipe Assadi Architects at a 4.5 Ha land area. Calera Tango is a commune located one hour from the capital. It is located in an intermediate situation between the Andes Mountains and the Coastal Range, from which one can see both limits with great clarity throughout the year. This country house consist of great Living room, dinning room, two bedrooms, two bathrooms, sauna, swimming pool and basement area. The materials used are preferably concrete and glass. Some areas of the body that are structural glazing were covered with Larch wood, a tree native aging with bright silver.

Literary Atmospheres
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
A British novelist has been awarded legal damages in excess of £100,000 because she writes thrillers, not literary masterpieces. What's at fault? She's been inhaling fumes from a nearby shoe factory. The author "claimed to have become so intoxicated" by the fumes that "she was reduced to writing thrillers." Indeed, the fumes grew so intense "that she was unable to concentrate on writing her highbrow novel, Cool Wind from the Future, and instead wrote a brutal crime story, Bleedout, which she found easier." That book went on to sell 10,000 copies. So there are several unspoken arguments being put forward by her claim. Such as: 1) Literary judgement. Why is one "reduced" to writing crime thrillers? ....

The Habitat 67 experience
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
Yesterday, I visited someone who lives in Habitat 67. It was the first time I had been inside the landmark apartment complex, built as part of Expo 67 and based on Moshe Safdie’s McGill master’s project, and I was surprised at what an awe-inspiring experience it was to wander through it. Although Habitat is known around the world for its unique modular design (The Walrus’ current issue has an interesting look at the ideas behind its design), what makes it a truly spectacular building is the way it relates to its surrounding environment. It’s an almost indescribable experience to stand on the top floor of Habitat, the St. Lawrence’s swift current rushing behind me, the sun setting over Mount Royal and the downtown skyline before me. If it hadn’t been so cold, I could have spent the entire afternoon staring at the ocean liners mired in ice, the port’s cranes framing the Farine Five Roses sign, the Victoria and Champlain bridges spanning an icy river bathed in pink light. More than that, though, Habitat actively frames that view, creating unexpected sightlines and unique vantage points.

January 25th, 2008

Forget about Dealing with Codes
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
 Whenever I see an image like this, part of me wishes that I could have a project in an area without codes and restrictions, and part of me wishes we saw more exciting projects that managed to deal with the local codes and restrictions...

Baraka
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
In a post at Blog Like You Give a Damn on Kowloon Walled City -- one of the most amazing self-generating entities I've witnessed via photographs and video -- commenter fred shares a reference to Baraka, a 1992 film by Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson with scenes of the walled city. The generous stills on this web site include a few images of the physical conglomeration that made up the walled city, illustrating its proximity to the now-demolished-just-like-the-walled-city Kai Tak Airport. Kowloon Walled City was demolished in 1993 for a number of reasons, so only images such as these are what survive for those, like me, fascinated by the place but never to visit it. Glancing at some of the other stills on the film's web site, Baraka clearly resembles another non-narrative film devoted to presenting imagery of the world's populations and their respective environments: Koyaanisqatsi.

Ben Rubin and Mark Hansen's Installation at the New York Times Building Moves Us
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
The idea to siphon the words and images from the New York Times' 156-year archive onto 560 small screens at the paper's new Renzo Piano headquarters seems like an innocent, obvious proposition---a printed paper, in a new age, "going...

Europe's biggest ski lodge.
Christoph, anArchitecture in anArchitecture
Austrian alpine architecture has evolved from modest rural huts to colossal recreational buildings. Strangely, the typology stayed the same – only the buildings got scaled up: Like bizarre caricatures of the historic heritage.
The Hohen-Haus Tenne Schladming is referred as Europe's biggest ski lodge – 3.000 m² total surface. The building houses a bar for 1.500 thirsty guests, seminar facilities, adventure toilets, dance floors, 35 plasma screens and restaurants.

PREFAB FRIDAY: A ‘House Boat’ for the Arctic
Ali Kriscenski in Inhabitat
Winter shelter in the Arctic can take form in an upside down hunting boat – a traditional Inuit practice. Covey Island Boatworks, award winning builders of hand-crafted yachts, power and sailboats, has brought that idea into dry dock developing a prototype wood and epoxy prefab that applies boatbuilding principles directly to an extreme Arctic home.

b4Architects: Europan 9, Kotka
architecture.MNP
Winners of an international call-for-entries for harbor-front redevelopment in Kotka, Finland, b4Architects [along with Matteo Rossetti and our ninja Luigi Valente] create a new urban interface between land and sea with their proposal for the Europan 9 competition. Kotka is a harbor town born from the local wood + paper industries - which brought business and shipping traffic to the harbor while causing a disconnect between the residents and the waterfront, much like other port-cities around the world. Now that these industries have different shipping/harbo-front needs, the city is left with a large expanse of empty waterfront to reshape - envisioning a realization of a ‘contemporary idea of living’.

Finally
David Sucher in City Comforts
C.R. Douglas in Crosscut Seattle on Shaky assumption: An Alaskan Way Viaduct myth is dispelled.

Delicate Exterior, Solid Interior
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
I quite like this project... an adminstrative office for the UAX company by Kamil Mrva Architects, this project has a very delicate and crafted exterior skin. Yet, at the same time, the interior experience gives the impression of solidity and heft. Its a very interesting contrast, making this simple box form not simple at all.

Preservation Chicago Unveils Chicago 7 '08 Monday, plus Tuesday Hearing on SOM Gunner's Mate Future
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Chicago Seven, 2008 edition. Monday, January 28th, from 12:15 to 12:45 P.M., President Jonathan Fine and VP Mike Moran will unveil grass roots activist group Preservation Chicago's list of the city's most endangered historic places for 2008. According to organization's press release, "This year promises to be different indeed. Included among the list of threatened buildings and districts will be one unconventional entry that will virtually throw down the gauntlet and present a challenge to City Hall." The event will take place at the John Buck Lecture Hall, at the Chicago Architecture Foundation, 224 S. Michigan.


 

January 24th, 2008

Big changes ahead for Mile End’s garment district
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
The old industrial area in the east part of Mile End, between St. Laurent and Henri Julien is set for a makeover. Yesterday, the city announced that $8.8 million will be invested in a two-year project meant to polish the district’s streets and improve its connections with surrounding neighbourhoods. Later this year, overhead electrical wires will be buried, new lampposts installed and sidewalks widened along St. Viateur from St. Laurent to de Gaspé. Then, next year, the city will extend St. Viateur from de Gaspé to Henri Julien....

The Ruins of the Unsustainable
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
I've been thinking about the fate of declining suburbs, bombed out shrinking old industrial cities and the drying up ghost towns of the high plains, when I came across a journal note mentioning something Bruce Sterling said to me this fall in San Francisco: "The ruins of the unsustainable are the 21st century's frontier."

GlassKote
Young in Architecture
" There are essentially three ways to colour glass; by coating one surface, through adding minerals and other pigments to molten glass during manufacturing, and by laminating two or more pieces of glass with a coloured material sandwiched in between. The problem with laminated technologies is that their appearance isn't always good (the depth and quality of the color), the edges are not attractive, the material can be difficult to work, the types of glass are limited and may not support tempered glass, and most importantly, it is very expensive. Colouring molten glass is often not suitable since it is translucent, there are only a handful of color options, and it's also very expensive.
When it comes to colour coatings for glass, several have come and gone, but none stand up to GlassKote.

hood residence, robert mellin architect
Justin in materialicious
Hood Residence, Middle Arm, Newfoundland. Built: 2005. Robert Mellin, MRAIC, is an Associate Professor at the School of Architecture at McGill University and a registered architect. He has also received a Manning Award and seven Southcott Awards (Newfoundland Historic Trust) for his heritage conservation work in Newfoundland.
Of particular interest to me is the use of red ochre paint, an old Newfoundland tradition. The contrast between the red ochre and yellow paint is striking, and I love the vernacular shed form.

New Landmarks Commission Officers Elected With Little Debate
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
As Fred Leeson reported in a small blurb from today's Oregonian, last week the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission elected its new officers. Member Carrie Richter nominated fellow member and developer Art DeMuro as chairman, and DeMuro nominated Richter as vice chairwoman. They won approval in a unanimous vote. For a commission that has perhaps been the most controversial entity in Portland design and construction, I was surprised to see that this vote happened with so little advance notice and public participation.

House K Project by Tham & Widegärd Hansson Arkitekter
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This K House project by Tham & Widegärd Hansson Arkitekter that is build in Stocksund, Stockholm is a thin block with some cut-outs for light, This house have a double-height and a roof terrace area. The light entering the house from several directions thru the shallow block that provides spaces. This is enhanced by the two double-heights that also guide views diagonally through the interior. The plan is simple: entrance and stairs fits into one box on ground level, a central passage on the upper floor gives access to bedrooms. The interior is one continuous space in two levels.

Richard Meier, Budding Garmento
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
You loved his buildings! You swooned after his collages! Now get ready to cozy up to your very own Richard Meier-designed cardigan! That's right, the architect is the newest guest designer for Lutz & Patmos, the seven-year-old label that...

from 3form: the pressed glass and poured glass collections
Justin in materialicious
3form now offers the Poured Glass and the Pressed Glass collections. See how they compare to the Varia (ecoresin) collection, here. Very cool and very useful.

‘Air Tree’ Structures in Madrid produce Oxygen and Energy
Karim Yergaliyev in Inhabitat
The city of Madrid soon plans to add a striking new structure that will “climatically transform” its urban architecture. Designed by Urban Ecosystems, the Air Tree pavilion is to be built from recycled materials and will be 100% energy self-sufficient. Using photovoltaic cells, the Air Tree produces a substantial amount of energy, which is then sold back to the local electric companies, the profits being used for maintenance of the structure. The second byproduct is of course oxygen - hence the name ‘Air Tree’!

World’s Nicest KFC?
architecture.MNP
Could this be the world’s nicest KFC [well, nicest looking - they’re all pretty gross, really]? Commissioned by KFC Iceland, the 450 square meter building was designed by pk arkitektar [yes, designed to be a KFC - they didn’t just move in later] and completed in 2005. My ninjas, PLEASE! Honestly, I think it looks ‘cold’ from the outside and that the concrete is a little overbearing - for a fast-food restaurant. That being said, I wouldn’t be complaining if they started replacing their US locations with buildings like this. I wonder what made them spend the money?

Aquarius Tower: Greenest Skyscraper on the Atlanta Skyline
Mahesh Basantani in Inhabitat
Just when you thought green towers couldn’t get any greener (or more towering), there’s a new kid on the block. The Aquarius Tower, a 500-foot tall condominium to be built in Atlanta, is the latest to join the burgeoning ranks of iconic green hi-rises. The building is designed around the four elements of life: sun (solar panels), water (reclamation systems), air (wind turbines) and earth (a minimal footprint).

Artful Project Documentation
jimmy in Life Without Buildings
Today, 1:04 AM
The architectural photography of Kurt & Walter Photographies: Amazing compositions and almost surreal environments.

Hyde Park Gangs Up on Solstice
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Today, 1:01 AM
Nineteenth century, meet the 21st. Just across from the Museum of Science and Industry, the last surviving structure from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, Solstice on the Park, a 26-story condo tower designed by Studio/Gang Architects is set to begin construction this coming summer (June 21st groundbreaking, anyone?) The project has already won Chicago Plan Commission approval, and has reportedly also received a fairly warm reception from local community groups....

January 23rd, 2008

Magic of America Image Database Goes Live
Brendan in Where
The digitization of Marion Mahony Griffin's The Magic of America made a small splash several months ago, but the extensive image library, which contains all 650+ illustrations from the original book, has just gone live this week. If you like what you see here, don't miss the electronic archive, which is full of drawings, maps, and photographs of buildings from the US, Australia, Japan, and India. It is most definitely worth some perusal.

Subtopia at the border...
Bryan Finoki in Subtopia
So, I am headed off to San Diego where (as mentioned before) I will be delivering – at best – an epic Subtopia post on global migration and the architectures of control used to contain it; or, at worst – a massive sequence of overworded sentences and depressing images of border fences and detention halls linked together by sweaty palms and the unpredictable tones of an insatiably dry cotton mouth. Sound fun? Ha!
Well, it should be, regardless. So if you are in the neck of the woods this Thursday evening, around 7PM, zip on over to the Woodbury University School of Architecture. It’s all part of their ongoing lecture series -- The Young and the Restless -- that certainly neither starts nor ends with me, so if you can’t make it on the 24th then you still have some time to check out other presentations who’ll be passing through until April.

Eco-Friendly Single Family Residence by AKA Architetti
Abigail Doan in Inhabitat
Italian designers are surely global frontrunners when it comes to cutting edge fashion and innovative design (as evidenced by our previous coverage of the 2007 Milan Furniture Fair. With this in mind, we are pleased to announce that AKA Architetti has just won an international competition for their development of a single-family, green home prototype that’s energy efficient, site adaptable, and incredibly stylish in its integration of interior and exterior architectural features.

Sweden, the E.U. and Renewables
Alan AtKisson in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
For those of you who are still thinking of Sweden as the country planning to become "Fossil Fuel Free" by 2020, today's announcements from Brussels -- where the European Commission has just released its proposed new compromise policy for climate change action, to grumbles from both the greens and browns -- should puncture any illusions, and remind you that a new government is in charge in this Nordic land. Sweden had been asked by the EU to increase the share of its electricity produced from renewable energy sources from today's 40% to 55% by the year 2020.

more houses by kamil mrva architects
Justin in materialicious
Just a few more houses by Kamil Mrva and his team. Previously: Family House in Dolní Bečva, Czech Republic. There’s a lot of good stuff happening in the Czech Republic.

TVA Unveils Revised UO Arena Design
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Bob Thompson and his firm, TVA Architects, have released a new design for the University of Oregon's arena that is more transparent -- arguably making it, to the project's benefit, a little more like Portland's Memorial Colisseum and less like the Rose Garden. I was a fan of the previous, more boxy design, but this clearly seems to be a step up. There will be a lot more light entering the arena now, especially at the perimeter. A building of this massive scale needs to be transparent, I think, to avoid the common problem of being a closed-off, monolithic presence on the landscape. One of the new features beside the glassier exerior and more curving form, according to a report in today's Oregonian, will be a wooden seating bowl that harkens back to Duck fans' beloved Mac Court. This would also add some greater natural materiality to TVA's work, which is always very sleek and modern.

Visualizing Change: Upcoming Workshops Blend Design & Civic Engagement
Colin in blog like you give a damn
With two annual design charrettes that focus on important aspects of our local built environment: homelessness and sustainability, February is one month Twin Cities designers can really get involved with the community. First up is the 3rd Annual Greenlight Design Workshop on February 1st and 2nd. Sponsored by the University of Minnesota's College of Design, Covanta Energy Recovery Center, and Hennepin County, the workshop will take a look the waste-to-energy facility located directly next to the new Twins Ballpark. The ballpark will soon bring thousands of people to site so there are many opportunities to design a more sustainable and hopefully inviting public interface. Additionally, necessary roof replacement and site work will allow us to provide options for new sustainable interventions....

Amazing Green Roof Art School in Singapore
Ali kriscenski in Inhabitat
If art school was in our future we might opt to study under, or on top of, the amazing green roof at the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. This 5 story facility sweeps a wooded corner of the campus with an organic, vegetated form that blends landscape and structure, nature and high-tech and symbolizes the creativity it houses.

pencils down
architecture.MNP
CADsmart is a program designed to measure the CAD abilities of a user being ‘tested’ by his/her office, rating the skills and efficiency of AutoCAD and Microstation users. In the UK, the average score after 1 hour 15 minutes is 66% - how would you rate?

Half Dose #43: Tile for Yu-un
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
With all the hoopla last week around Olafur Eliasson's "four man-made waterfalls, 90 to 120 feet high, [that] will punctuate New York’s waterfront for three months starting in mid-July," it seemed like an appropriate time to look at the Icelandic artists other environmental installations.

The Future of (Urban) Shopping
Brendan in Where
"Describe your street. Describe another street. Compare." That suggestion, originally made by Gorges Perec, is part of a longer quote sourced in a recent post at Pasta & Vinegar by blogger Nicholas Nova. Nova examines Perec's suggestion that we should "question [our] teaspoons," or look critically at things that we consider mundane or take for granted. "Make an inventory of you pockets, of your bag," the quote continues. "Ask yourself about the provenance, the use, what will become of each of the objects you take out."

January 22nd, 2008

So Where Is It?
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
Yesterday, 11:41 PM
This 'Room for Art in Zumikon' is an interesting project by andreas fuhrimann, gabrielle hächler architects (afgh). Designed to appear as a monolithic carving in stone or concrete, the interior and exterior finishes as well as the structure are a seamless extension of one another. The stopped in glass eliminates the need for any materials other than concrete or glass... While the lighting is quite dramatic, I have to wonder where are the art is? If this is a room for art, then why can't I see any? In fact, the only thing I see other than concrete in glass are light switches, which is an unfortunate focal point in one of the photographs. While these images are quite appealing, like with other projects, I wish that I could see the building occupied. After all, without program, what separates architecture from sculpture?


Recent news on Griffintown redevelopment
Chris Erb in Spacing Montreal
Griffintown has graced the pages of the local media a great deal over the last couple weeks. Here is a rundown of many of the stories concerning the neighbourhood and Devimco’s proposed redevelopment: Jan. 9: La Presse reports that the Conseil du patrimoine is deeply critical of the “Village Griffintown” project. They’re worried that a development that is to be carried out by demolishing all but a few historically significant buildings may completely erase the area’s Irish and industrial heritage that goes back well over 200 years.
Jan. 10: The Gazette accuses Devimco of conflict of interest due to their pushing for a rail link between downtown to the South Shore which would have stops in the Griffintown development as well as near Devimico’s Dix30 shopping centre in Brossard. Furthermore, there is some major overlap with Devimico and Bombardier who would likely be building the trains and trams that would go through the redeveloped Griffintown. Neath at the Walking Turcott Yards blog gives his opinion on the whole debacle....

Seed Architecture Ready to Sprout
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Along with major trends like sustainability and condo building, the rise of more studio-sized firms in Portland over the last several years has been encouraging. One of the latest to take root is Seed Architecture, which is headed by Darin Dougherty, whose resume includes two other first-rate local firms, Skylab Design and Architropolis. His business partner Greg is a contractor, so Seed anticipates being able to handle both design and construction, a very enticing package. As if that weren’t enough, Greg also has founded on the side a sustainable surface (counter tops, tile) manufacturing company, Fuez.

Mass Studies: Torque House
architecture.MNP
We’ve all seen Mass Studies all over the internets recently [the firm was featured on MNP a while back - although I was a little harsh] - the Ann Demeulemeester’s store in Seoul, South Korea in particular. I first came across this project, the Torque House, in the February issue of Dwell Magazine - who feature a full page image [the shot below] of the home as a ‘house [they] love’ - and I was compelled to find out more. Located in, Gyeonggi-do, Korea, the project is a three-story, 134-pyeong [I’ve learned from Mass Studies that 1 pyeong equals 3.3 square meters - cool to know] house for a family of four.

Harry Allen Has a Brand New Pair of Roller Skates
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 1:28 PM
But they're sold separately! Harry Allen & Associates, the design firm that brought you that iconic porcine conversation piece/bank "cast from a pig that died a natural death" and a bookshelf made from resin-cast books has just added some...

red cabin by the sea, staffan strindberg
Justin in materialicious
Staffan Strindberg’s modern interpretation of the Swedish “Red Stuga” - this project was nominated for the Swedish Red Paint Prize in 2004, using traditional Swedish Falu(n) Red Paint (linseed oil paint). Nicely photograped by Gudrun Thielemann

beautiful kitchen, nicholas budd dutton architects
Justin in materialicious
Remodelista sure can pick ‘em. There is absolutely no reason that Modern can’t be Warm and Bright.. Go see more at Nicholas Budd Dutton Architects

Jetson Green: GreenMobile
architecture.MNP
Preston, green ninja master over at Jetson Green writes: GreenMobile was a Lifecycle Building Challenge winner in the Professional Unbuilt category.  Now, mounting success upon success, Michael Berk, creator of the concept, has a prototype in the works to be unveiled in March 2008.  Can’t wait to see that!  GreenMobile was awarded $5.8 M from FEMA to further develop the prototype and roughly 80 units are in the pipeline right after that prototype comes through.
 
Newsbits: Driehaus Profiled, White House Redesigned, Internet Censored
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Driehaus Profiled. The New York Times' Robert Sharoff has a great profile of Chicago's congenial anti-modernist, investment guru Richard Driehaus. “Modern architecture has become totally homogenized and uninteresting,” Driehaus is quoted as saying “One streetscape in Prague is worth all of Dubai, visually.” It's an observation that, knowing Dubai only through pictures, I might be inclined to agree with, but to call modern architecture "homogenized" is statement more of inattention than judgement. ...

January 20th, 2008

House for Sale in Venice, California
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
Yesterday, 10:40 PM
The sale House, Designed for a typical residential lot in Venice, California, engages a historic building, Morphosis' 2-4-6-8 Studio, existing on the property, to produce a new variation of residential courtyard architecture. Maximizing the use of a small lot, transparent walls and windows together with an interiorized courtyard turn the typical single-family house inside out, creating an expanded landscape for living and working.

Hang Your Coat Before You Sit Down
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
Living in a teeny tiny house, I can really appreciate this multi-purpose design by Erohina Yulia. Even though this particular chair is meant for cafes and such, I think it would be really useful as a bedside chair. C is always throwing his clothes for the next day over the side of a chair... so much so in fact, that I've often thought about getting him a valet. Of course, they're not exactly modern in design, so this chair would be a great alternative!

Contemporary West Capitol Hill Residence by Stuart Silk Architect
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This Contemporary 1950’s West Capitol Hill Residence architectural renovation project is the great challenge for the Stuart Silk Architects, The challenge in adding a second story while preserving a sunroom, glass-walled den, and garage at either end of the house. They begin to give their best solution for this West Capitol Hill Residence by giving a new two-story entrance atrium, which floods the house with light and takes advantage of views of the city, Lake Union, Puget Sound, and the Olympic Mountains. Clerestory windows open the living room and master bedroom suites to the expansive views. And wing-shaped metallic roofs make it seem the home is soaring above the surrounding trees.

Merzbau in the Zeitgeist
jimmy in Life Without Buildings
Last week while cruising the internets (or "surfing the web," if you like), I couldn't help but notice a few Merzbau-like projects making the rounds on the blogsphere. First, let's take a look at Kurt Schwitters' original live/work environment. As photos were prohibited, this first shot was discreetly the Sprengel Musuem in Hannover, where a portion of the Merzbau has been reconstructed. [Merzbau money shot via] This next project, El fin del Muundo al techo, was designed and built by...

Conservation Easements, Climate Foresight and Resilience
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Back in 1930, Anna Fahey's grandfather bought 100 acres on Washington's remote and stunning Cypress Island, for a $50 down payment at an auction. In a story that many native Westerners will recognize, that land became her family's anchor place, and a place they came to care enough to fight for. It's one of the great untold stories of the American West, that for thousands and thousands of regular families who wanted a place in the beauty that surrounded them, owning land came to mean being in some fundamental sense owned by it. A great number of the staunchest, brightest and most visionary rural sustainability advocates in the West are these folks. Anna wrote a great piece, My Grandfather's Legacy about how her family has moved to protect their own parcel through a conservation easement, which is a legal strategy that more people ought to know about....

World’s Greenest Building Going Up In Paris - Energy Plus
Jorge Chapa in Inhabitat
The home of the Eiffel Tower is getting a new architectural innovation- and a green one at that. The Energy Plus office building, to be located outside of Paris, is designed to consume no electricity other than that which it creates itself. This zero-energy building, according to the designers, will be the greenest office building ever created.

Three on Martin Luther King Junior Memorial Drive
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
In 1885, when architect William Wilson Clay built the mansion for real estate developer D. Henry Hammer at 3656 south, it was called Grand Boulevard, a great, tree-lined urban processional of prominent houses. According to the AIA Guide to Chicago, it was laid out in 1869 by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux as one of two great boulevards (the other being Drexel Boulevard, a half mile to the east), to link Washington Park in Hyde Park, then a Chicago suburb, with the city proper. When John T. Long designed the great Richardson Romanesque house of worship that opened a few blocks to the south in 1889, it was called the 41st Street Presbyterian Church.


 

January 19th, 2008

The Green Prize: What Were the Most Worldchanging Books of 2007?
WorldChanging Team in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Last year we had the honor of receiving a Green Prize for Sustainable Literature for our book, and we're glad to see they're going to be awarding them again. It's a pretty cool idea, acknowledging authors who are writing well about the future of the planet: Criteria The title must have been published in the United States in the 2007 calendar year. The title must reflect basic sustainability criteria: -Future and long-term oriented -Awareness of ecological and resource limits -Regional as well as global in scope -Cognizant that everything is interconnected -Concerned with creating diverse and balanced communities -Inclusive of social equality and well-being -Supportive of public involvement in community decisions -Promotes environmental, economic or social equity ideals...

VS 20.01.2008: NextHouse
architecture.MNP
For this week’s Video Sunday we’re featuring Dwell’s NextHouse, by Empyrean. Designed for Empyrean by architect Joel Turkel [who also lectures at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning], the NextHouse is the premier showcase for the Dwell Homes by Empyrean - and you can track progress of the model home in Hillsborough, NC here.

A Blob Overhead
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
In general, I've got pretty mixed opinions about amorphous blog architecture... but something about this project is appealing to me. The labratory of art and ideas at Belmar by Belzberg Architects is an interesting insertion of a blob form into an existing retail space. The penetration of the blob through the glass entry wall, to form a covered entry space is in my opinion particularly well done. In fact, although its kind of reminiscent of someone sticking out their tongue, I still like it... Part of my usual critique of these blob forms is that they often ignore function completely in favor of form. I appreciate that this architecture firm attempted to create a functional design as part of their sophisticated amorphous form.

LOXFORD TOWER RIP
Catriona Potts in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
It may interest ex-Manchester Polytechnic students of Architecture that Loxford Building is being demolished. Although the School of Architecture moved out of the building some eight or so years ago, for many years before that it was the seat of disorder, mayhem, culture and learning. There are...

Art, Nature, and the Science of Sustainable Design on Lake Washington Residence
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This is the Lake Washington Residence Project that was brings to you by Osca Architect, Located in Seattle, Washington, This waterfront home project is bringing themes of art, nature, and the science of sustainable design. Site orientation is the main attention for this house project to respond to features of site ( existing shade trees ), the sun's path, optimal views across the lake, prevailing winds, and the clients’ intention to actively use the outdoor spaces on and around their home.

Today's archidose #171
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture , originally uploaded by kwikzilver.
De Citadel in Almere, Netherlands by Christian de Portzamparc.

Nordpark Cable Railway, Zaha Hadid Architects
architect studio in architect studio
“Each station has its own unique context, topography, altitude, and circulation. We studied natural phenomena such as glacial moraines and ice movements - as we wanted each station to use the fluid language of natural ice formations, like a frozen stream on the mountainside.” "The railway reflects the city’s continued commitment to the highest standards of architecture and pushes the boundaries of design and construction technology. These stations are the global benchmark for the use of double-curvature glass in construction."

I-MAD
Young in Architecture
"MAD's designs embrace the advent of a new era. These designs reflect our architectural exploration in contemporary art, the transformed life style, and the multimedia formats in contemporary cities in China. Our Experiment of integrating digital media in designs demonstrates a unique approach in architecture. Dedicated in understanding and exploring the inherent flexibility and possibility from simple and traditional functions, MAD imbues the flexibility and possibility with new organizations and logics by analyzing value, desire, culture, and political strength in contemporary China. With fluid and dynamic presentation of contemporary lives, buildings are no longer isolated objects as defined in traditional concept of architecture...

Adam Werbach: Make Sustainability "Irresistible"
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Adam Werbach opens the closing keynote of Compostmodern by saying something very simple. We need leaders. We need leaders and you are in the sweet spot. Designers need to exercise the power you have because you own the process...

January 19th, 2008

Another photo flashback: Montreal in the 1980s
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
I had completely forgotten about John Allison’s great photos of Montreal in the early 1980s (in both colour and black-and-white) until Kate McDonnell reminded me of them with a post on her Montreal City blog yesterday.

Plan Commission Shows Backbone - Will it Stick or Will it Farwell?
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
In something of a surprise, the Chicago Plan Commission had a rare show of independence last Thursday when it rejected a Chicago Department of Planning Development-backed proposal, that would have seen the embattled Congress Hotel add five stories above the Harrison Street side of the structure, and one story above the part along the landmarked Michigan Avenue street wall. The action was not unlike the one last January when the Landmarks Commission rejected another Planning Department initiative to demolish the landmarked Farwell Building on North Michigan Avenue. Opponents won, not because they were in the majority, but because the proposal fell short of a majority....

Everybody's got a Bu
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
I was initially drawn to this project by Sunday Melendo and Francisco Parron because of the beautiful contrast of light and shadow in these crisp white boxes. Its quite a modern and almost clinical solution for a grandparent's multi-generational home... Where are they going to put all the picture frames? But nonetheless, the contrast between light and dark (and light and lighter) is spectacular.


 

January 18th, 2008

Frank Gehry Lands the Serpentine Pavilion
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 6:39 PM
We can imagine the scene now. Koolhaas and Hadid are sitting around at a party, having a couple of beers, looking across the room at the lonely guy in the corner. "Poor guy," one of them says, "he's the...

John Silber Stays Vigilant as Architecture's Watchdog
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 6:37 PM
Proof that John Silber isn't just publishing a controversial book ("Architecture of the Absurd"), but backing it up by living the life too. Appearing in the Letters to the Editor section of The Boston Globe this week was a...

Don't Worry, Eliasson's Waterfalls Are Green
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
This summer, before you cry foul at Olafur Eliasson's waterfalls art project in the East River in Manhattan, tsk tsk tsking about how wasteful it must be, know that the city is trying their best to keep it as...

Japanese House on Mt.Yataka

Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This House is located 300m height above sea on the top of Mountain Yataka. The house that build for the Stone-Sculptor. This house have maximum-opened shelter that can be open to nature and can be protected according to the outside conditions. The shelter form that have two roof slabs, covers sloping ground and offer the house with four different level floors that following the site slope. These four spaces are connected into one-room space and integrated into its surroundings.

ÅÖÄ
Catriona Potts in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
The Holden Gallery at the Manchester School of Art is exhibiting the work of a group of MA students from the Academy of Fine Art in Helsinki and although the flyer states that the work is “…characterised as much by the attention to the sense of trace, the index of the artists mark, as by [...]

More High Density Growing Pains: Award Winning Up-And-Comer Works Partnership's Latest Critized as 'Brutal'
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
An article by Tyler Graf in yesterday's Daily Journal of Commerce highlights a seemingly controversial new condo project near Montgomery Park at NW Upshur and 26th.  The site occupies an entire block in this borderline zone (along with the adjacent Vaughn Street) between residential and industrial areas. It is to be six stories in a neighborhood with mostly smaller two and three-story ones. In the DJC article, neighbors from the La Torre condominiums next door to the project, including Academy Award winning animator Joan Gratz, express worry and even a little hostility. She even is quoted as saying, "It makes you wonder what (architecture) school they went to," and complains that the development would "block views, create street congestion and tower over the sleepy hillside."

Getting Physical at DLD 2008
Neri Oxman in MATERIALECOLOGY: Neri Oxman
DLD (Digital, Life, Design) is Europe's conference for the 21st century, covering digital innovation, science and culture and bringing together thought leaders from Europe, the Middle-East, America and Asia. The three-day event is chaired by publisher Hubert Burda and investor Joseph Vardi and hosted by Stephanie Czerny and Marcel Reichart.
The conference will commence this weekend at the HVB Forum in Munich, Germany.

PREFAB FRIDAY: Straw Bale Meets Factory Built in Switzerland
Ali kriscenski in Inhabitat
We’re quite taken by Strohhaus in Eschenz, Switzerland. Designed by Zurich-based architect Felix Jerusalem, this home masterfully combines prefab with sustainable materials, primarily prefabricated strawboard panels that provide affordable, environmentally sound insulation. Jerusalem exploits the strawboard with translucent siding giving the structure a clean, modern aesthetic that showcases the material.

Amazing Bubble House from Anti Lovag
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
I met Mr Council, the project owner in 2003. He dream Living in a house bubble, I dreamed of building one. The agreement was therefore very quickly cordiale one of the main constraints of the project was to conduct a housing allowing Mr Council to receive his friends while maintaining maximum independence during the visit of those.


January 14th, 2008

Is LEED Green Enough?
Michelle Linden in Atelier A+D
I'm a bit embarrassed to admit that I'm not yet LEED certified... I keep meaning to take the test, but after finishing the AREs, I'm frankly not all that interested in studying. Besides my lack of motivation for studying in general, I'm just not very motivated to take the exam because I'm not completely convinced of its merits. I consider myself a fairly green person, and try to design green whenever my job allows it (which I must admit is not as often as I'd like), so I've never really understood how LEED would or could help me in my work.

Half Dose #41: Hungerburgbahn
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
While I try not to feature projects by the likes of Zaha Hadid, who have every completed project published in print and online, this funicular station in Innsbruck, Austria by the Pritzker Prize winner caught my eye enough that I decided to feature it. Actually comprised of four stations, the just over 1 mile (1.8km) long Nordpark Cable Railway (Hungerbergbahn) connects the center of Innsbruck, Alpenzoo (the world's highest zoo) and, naturally, a mountaintop ski resort.

We Love To Build
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
The We Love To Build series, by British designer Paul Hollingworth, is an act of genius. The above image, in its original size, is ridiculously good. That hovering corner, detached but connected to guy-wires, is weirdly mesmerizing – and the slotted drawers, whole pieces of the building sliding in and out as if on hidden railers, add such an incredible sense of weight and dynamism, I'd almost like to see this structure built. But only as long as parts of it drift upward, attached to cabling...

two houses in maine, sheila narusawa
Justin in materialicious

Ecolect and NAU Event in Chicago this Friday!
Emily in Inhabitat
We love NAU and we love Ecolect (one of our recent holiday party cohosts). So it’s natural that we’re wishing we were in the Midwest for the Ecolect “3rd Coast” launch party at the NAU store in Chicago.

Traveling Without Moving
Chris in Brand Avenue
New York City's Lower East Side--the storied, once forlorn corner of the city turned crossroads of cultural production and wellspring of "cool"--is now brought into extreme proximity via the virtual transportation capabilities of the Internet. Rather than visiting the neighborhood in person, imbibe the local ambience via the MMOPRG Virtual Lower East Side online instead. The world of VLES...is an idealized, Smurf Village reduction of the real Lower East Side, and yet instantly recognizable to anyone who’s logged more hours at Pianos than he cares to admit or ducked out to Rosario’s Pizza for a late-night slice....

The Right Choice to finds a lots of House and Flats offers in Edinburgh
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
Welcomehome.co.uk will be the right choice for you it you are planning to buy or rent some house or flats offers in United Kingdom ( UK ), At there you can finds lots of house and flats offers so easily with an uptodate news and property guidance that can help you finding your best property deal in UK. For the beginning, after viewing their main page, you can start looking some flats to buy in Edinburgh and finds a lots of flats offers in edinburgh with an interactive map, area reviews, and a detailed table of information about property prices that can help you finding the best property offers to buy there.

Bloch Wins Awards
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Not surprisingly, Steven Holl's Bloch Building addition to the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri wins an 2008 AIA Honor Award for Architecture [PDF link]. Of course, not everybody's thinks that award is what the addition should receive...

January 11th, 2008

Treehouse of Steven Isaacs and Lisa
Mohammad Fahmi Tri Wahyudi,ST in Best House Design
This treehouse project that was designed for Steven Isaacs and Lisa Saville residence is an architectural home office that has an environmentally sensitive in design, with no tree cutting during the construction, and each three- to four-bedroom property was built on eight steel piers, or supports, so the building "touched the earth lightly". This treehouse include eco-smart elements in design such as the application of home's elegant butterfly roof that creates and provides shade, draws in morning light and channels rainwater into 9000-litre water tanks.

Wired, Backstories and the Winnowing of Green Media
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Chris Anderson, of Wired, made some bold claims the other day. He looked at Wired's activities, and claimed that it was more sustainable to publish on paper than on the web, and that, in effect, paper publication was a carbon sequestration project. Here's his argument: 1. Trees take carbon out the air. Carbon negative 2. Sustainable forestry companies (the only kind we use) cut down those trees, and plant an equal number to replace them (trees absorb the most carbon in the young, high-growth period of their life. Update: see comments for more on this)....

How Do We Share Design Innovation in Cities?
WorldChanging Team in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
By Justus Stewart
To walk down the streets of a major US city is to experience the impacts of decades of bad design, in streets and sidewalks, in architecture, in density and use of space. . I do not use the word design as some subjective stand-in for ‘what I like’ (though aesthetics are a valid basis for criticism); I mean design for the future, design for human beings. Our cities are designed with an overwhelming bias towards the needs of automobiles, rather than people.

What do you no longer believe? What do you now believe?
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
John Brockman has a new question: What have you changed your mind about? Why? Here are some interesting answers: LAURENCE C. SMITH. Professor of Geography, UCLA [The Impossibility of] Rapid climate change
The year 2007 marked three memorable events in climate science: Release of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ...

Intriguing Earth Architecture 39
Bradley in east coast Architecture review
Zollverein School of Design, Essen, Germany - SANAA

Cubion Office by Jackie Bertelsen
Frame Magazine
Friday, 10:31 AM
Jackie Bertelsen gave the interior of the [link=http://www.cubion.dk]Cubion[/link] office in Copenhagen a calm and creative atmosphere.  Read more…

I went to the car park because I wished to live deliberately
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
"By the end of January," The Scotsman writes, "it's essential to be back in Edinburgh... where Nicholas Bone's intriguing performance company Magnetic North stages a version of Henry Thoreau's Walden, one of the most famous essays ever written on the idea of self-sufficiency and human harmony with nature." The set has been designed by Sans Façon. What blows me away, though, is the suggestion, in the image, above, that one could build a kind of personal retreat in the middle of an underground car park. You're fed up. You want to be alone, to spend some time getting to know your own inner tendencies, how you react to things free from the influence of others...

The [new] Rural Studio: Hale County Animal Shelter…done
architecture.MNP
I have been an admirer of the work of the Rural Studio from the time I learned about their work as a tike in school. The architecture developed within the walls of the studio incorporates a certain visual appeal while providing practicality in use. Since the programs early beginnings under the late architectural patriarch Samuel ‘Sambo’ Mockbee, the scope of the program [as well as my interest in what they do] has not diminished a bit.

PREFAB FRIDAY: ‘Watershed’ Sustainable Writer’s Retreat
Ali in Inhabitat
It’s easy to see how inspiration takes hold in ‘Watershed’ - a 100 square foot writer’s retreat in Oregon that is as sustainable as it is engaging. Commissioned by a well-known nature writer and designed by FLOAT architectural research and design, this small-scale project fulfills its intention of revealing the surrounding ecology while allowing observation without disturbance. Completely recyclable and constructed with an ultra-light footprint, ‘Watershed’ does well by its name.

Endgame for One of Chicago's Great Public Places?
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
The Chicago Daily News Building, Holabird and Root's elegant Art Deco skyscraper from 1929, was the first building constructed over railroad air rights. With its broad graceful plaza, it was the first project not to turn its back on the Chicago River, but to embrace it. Now the Daily News Building is threatened with being cast in the shadows, and its great plaza destroyed, by a new office tower reportedly being considered by billionaire developer Sam Zell. Read all about the building's history, endangered present, and future potential, here.

Troika by Norman Foster with GDP architects
Young in Architecture
I recalled my ex-colleague (from GDP) showing me the plans of this project while I was working with something similar 2years ago. Architecture is not always as fun as it seems to be at times. We need to fulfill the plot ratio requirement and make up something special as selling point. Troika is a luxury with a free plan; random composition of vertical elements and horizontal concrete slabs; the contrast of materials between transparent glazing and solid concrete and the symphony of lights at night just makes it fun and lovely to see. There is an interesting video clip in http://www.troika.com.my/ "The residential Troika Development is located at the north-eastern corner of Kuala Lumpur City Centre Park, with comprehensive views of the Park and Petronas Towers. The Foster design responds to the unique location with a scheme of three residential towers - of 38, 44, and 50 storeys respectively - that will be the tallest residential development in Malaysia. "

Two2Read
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Why Foster’s Hearst Tower is no gherkin. Early last year I panned Hearst Tower in a Gridskipper compilation of the ugliest buildings in New York. Many of you disagreed with me (some strongly), so it was refreshing to see Robert Campbell take a stab at critiquing the design's faults. The Boston Globe critic asserts some of the same things I found disturbing about Lord Foster's diagrid tower, namely process over program and context, though he does it at length and more articulately.
Marcella Durand on the Infinite Library
"New York-based poet Marcella Durand on a dream of hers that begins with 18th century French architect Etienne-Louis Boullée, weaves through Borges, and emerges in the unknowable future of the infinite library", where "many books are infinitely preferable to one." One for the bibliophile in me...and you.


 

January 10th, 2008

The Young and the Restless [Subtopia in San Diego]
Bryan Finoki in Subtopia
Two weeks from tonight I will be in San Diego giving a presentation for the Woodbury University School of Architecture. The Lecture Series, entitled ‘The Young and the Restless,’ began last year and continues through April focusing on young architects who are engaged in dynamic volatile urban areas and/or are working within other venues and media, like blogs, non profits, publishers, etc. A refreshing focus, to say the least.
Being that this is my first ever official public lecture-like presentation as the author of Subtopia, I am super excited about this. So let me just say thanks right now to Rene Peralta and Teddy Cruz for inviting me, and to Andrea Dietz for helping to organize it all. This should be really cool, and I’ll also be touring Tijuana a bit while I'm there,too, with Rene, who (as you may or not know) pulled together the Arch League’s amazing Worldview focus on the city a while back, and who co-wrote the fascinating book, Here Is Tijuana!

Welcome to Little Maghreb
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
Walk a few minutes east from Saint-Michel metro and you’ll find yourself in one of Montreal’s most recent ethnic neighbourhoods: the Petit Maghreb, a 15-block strip of North African businesses along Jean Talon Street between St. Michel and Pie IX boulevards. Nearly half of Montreal’s 63,000 immigrants from Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia arrived here after 2001. They’re quickly making their presence felt. Last spring, a group of Jean Talon St. business owners announced their intention to create a “Petit Maghreb” business district along the lines of Little Italy and Chinatown.

Chicago’s Festival of Maps
Spacing in Spacing Montreal
CHICAGO — Not much sounds more appealing than a Festival of Maps, and Chicago delivered that holiday gift (and continues to deliver it) in its multi-site ongoing exhibit and lecture series that runs the gamut from tablet to tube map. While home for the holidays I was able to check out two exhibits, Maps, Finding Our Place in the World at the Field Museum (through Jan 27) and Mapping Chicago: The Past and the Possible at the Chicago History Museum (closed Jan 6).

Kahn on Kahn
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Pardon the lateness of this announcement, but this evening at 6PM the AIA Center For Architecture will be having a screening of My Architect, a film about the great Louis Kahn by his son, Nathaniel. Obviously Kahn is among the handful of very greatest 20th Century architects, and he has a little bit of a Portland connection. Thomas Hacker, head of Thomas Hacker Architects, got his start in Kahn's office. As it happens, I happened to talk with Hacker about his time in Kahn's office recently for an article I'm working on. He stressed the interweaving of teaching and professional practice, and the need to be constantly searching in one's work for new ideas and solutions.

house in southern bohemia, martina buřičová and štěpán kubíček
Justin in materialicious
Family House in Southern Bohemia (CHKO Třeboňsko, Czech Republic). Size: 280 m². Built: 2007. The site is Czech, so it’s hard to translate, but from what I understand, the house, which is right near one of the six Czech UNESCO MAB biospheric reserves, has been built with an eye towards eco-friendliness and uses alternative energy systems. If you find more info on this, or are able to translate, feel free to drop me a line. I like the house’s design, with those round skylights and the contrasting materials…..

alien library
architecture.MNP
The London-based architect behind the Selfridges store in Birmingham and the ‘pod’ at Lord’s cricket ground won the contest to design a national library in his native Prague - the first major new public building since the 18th century. But already opposition is brewing [read the article over at the Guardian...

Phos Architects: Mersey Observatory
architecture.MNP
A proposal by Phos Architects‘ has recently been shortlisted [along with 4 other proposals] for the design of the Mersey Observatory in Crosby [North of Liverpool, UK] - on a site currently occupied by a now obsolete radio tower. The design competition, held by RIBA, received around 100 entries from all over the world - which were reduced to the 5 remaining finalists. These 5 will meet with the judging panel in February, and a winner should be announced sometime in March.

Ecological Strategies in Today's Art (part 2)
Regine Debatty in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Ecomedia - Ecological Strategies in Today's Art, currently running at the Edith Russ Haus in Oldenburg, presents projects founded on progressive ecological models and conceive utopian horizons in the process. (Part One is here.)
Tue Greenfort's contribution to the show is a simple plastic bottle. Just a bottle... until you have a look at the title of the sculpture: “Producing 1 Kilogram of PET Plastic Requires 17.5 Kilograms of Water and results in air emissions of 40 grams of hydrocarbons, 25 grams of sulfur oxides, 18 grams of carbon monoxide, 20 grams of nitrogen oxides, and 2.3 kilograms of carbon dioxide. In terms of water use alone, much more is consumed in making the bottles than will ever go into them” (2004). I can't dream of anything more self-explanatory.

Going Green - Chicago City Hall
admin in mirage.studio.7
I came across an interesting article on the latest Time Magazine, it is about greening rooftops. According to the magazine, in an effort to conserve energy, reduce storm water runoff and deflect heat, the roof of Chicago City Hall has been transformed into a brilliant garden. Undeniably it is a good idea, since urban landscape viewed from above can sometimes be an eye sore, ugly in short, or at least that is what most people perceived it to be. Green roofs are not limited to the city; instead it is what cities around the world needed the most. Chicago has 214,000 sq/m of rooftop gardens and many more on the way.

A Taste Of Tokyo In Wolfsburg
Frame Magazine
Europeans looking for a taste of Tokyo can find it at [link=http://www.autostadt.de/]Autostadt[/link] in Wolfsburg, Germany.  Read more…

Bierut Chats About Typography with The Atlantic
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
By way of the wonderful Typographica, we found this new clip of everyone's favorite "designer I wish I could hang out with a lot," Michael Bierut, talking to the online version of the magazine The Atlantic about all things typography....

Hedrich Blessing Interiors at ArchiTech
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
This Friday marks the opening of Hedrich Blessing Interiors: Architectural Photography of the 1930's: Art Deco interiors photographed by Ken Hedrich at the ArchiTech gallery. According to the announcement: Hedrich Blessingwas the the choice of the best architects and designers to document their creations. And like their famously cinematic exterior shots of the modern buildings that made them known the world over, HB's interior views often resembled movie sets.

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City
Young in Architecture
" American Institute of Architects (AIA) has bestowed one of its most prestigious awards, the AIA 2008 Institute Honor Award for Architecture, upon the addition to The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City designed by Steven Holl Architects. Annually, the Institute Honor Awards program recognizes a select number of buildings with this important prize in order to elevate the general quality of architecture practice, establish a standard of excellence against which all architects can measure performance, and inform the public of the breadth and value of the architecture practice.


 

January 9th, 2008

villa maria, fahlander arkitekter
Justin in materialicious
Villa Maria, somewhere in Sweden [Note: See first comment] Not too long ago, I ran across a quirky little blog called Below the Clouds (written in Swedish), and recently up popped this lovely project which I’m drooling over. I’m mad for wood houses, especially Scandinavian wood houses…. Hit their site to blow up the photos, look closely, and you’ll be able to see the green showing through in the paint job - specifically, it is Falu Verde (green linseed oil paint). I’ve written on Swedish Linseed Oil Paint before.

What Ever Happened to Burnside Bridgehead?
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture Remember a few years ago when there was a big to-do over which developer would win the Portland Development Commission's RFP contract for the Burnside Bridgehead? You can be forgiven if it's a foggy memory by now. In fact, it was a full four years ago that PDC first floated the idea of having a big-box retail outlet there, before withdrawing the plan amidst widespread community uproar against it.

Today's archidose #167
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Porto, Conjunto Habitacional Travessa de Salgueiros. Carlos Veloso, Gil Monte e Helder Coelho., originally uploaded by z.z.
Conjunto Habitacional Travessa de Salgueiros in Porto, Portugal by Carlos Veloso, Gil Monte & Helder Coelho.

Dallas Enters Contention for 'Fancy New Architecture City' With Addition of Thom Mayne
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Well maybe we spoke too soon about Denver and the whole of Arkansas. It was announced yesterday that big shot Thom Mayne has just been given the commission to design a new Museum of Nature & Science in Dallas,...

Korean Robots to Construct High-Rises By 2010
admin in mirage.studio.7
We’ve been sending humans to do a robot’s job for quite sometime now, and in a few short years the Korean are going to flood the market with cheap construction robots that promise to cut labor costs by a third, construction time by 15% and the number of construction related accidents. The catch? Our great civilization stands to benefit greatly from cheaper houses, until the robot builders decided to turn us into human fuel cells, that is a big IF. Fear not, the robot does not comes in the shape of a human, it is a simple nuts-and-bots robot arm found mainly in a car assembly line, the Korean Robot will create a construction process almost totally automated, taking advantage of 12 high-tech patents including so-called “intelligent” cranes and the world’s first bolt-tightening robots. The bad news is, countries that supply cheap construction labor such as India, Pakistan and Indonesia could find an increase in unemployment rate due to the preference for construction robots.

January 8th, 2008

Metropolitan Museum Director Philippe de Montebello to Step Down
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Philippe de Montebello, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art since 1978, will step down from his position by year's end. The museum will officially confirm his planned departure at a news conference tomorrow at 11am, the Met's senior vice...

casa cachagua, f3 arquitectos
Justin in materialicious
Casa Cachagua, Cachagua, Chile. Built: 2006-2007. This house just knocks my socks off… Black-stained pine on a stone foundation, and extra care was taken to build around the trees, rather than cutting them down. Always a good thing. See some more lovely photos and drawings at Plataforma Arquitectura. Another project the firm did that I’m madly in love with and posted a while ago is House and Chapel in Rupanco, Chile.

hotel elquidomos, f3 arquitectos
Justin in materialicious
Hotel ElquiDomos, Pisco Elqui, Coquimbo, Chile. This astronomy-themed hotel is comprised of large dome-tents (with loft beds!) set on platforms, located high up in the Andes, which are renowned for clear views of the night skies. The domes were designed by Nicolás Fones of the Chilean architectural firm Ftres Arquitectos for Eco Domos, which supplies domes for the deluxe camping and residential markets in South America. Similar to this hotel is Whitepod, located high up in the Swiss Alps. Here in the U.S. we have Pacific Domes, which is an awesome company that’s been around for a while - visit that site for lots of eye candy and inspiration. Pretty cool, huh?

EMBT Housing, Barcelona
Catriona Potts in CONTINUITY IN ARCHITECTURE
Yesterday, 12:03 PM
The slightly warped orthogonal form of the housing next to the Santa Caterina market contrasts strongly with the flowing roof canopy of the market building. The contextual deformations of the housing appear responsive and natural in the tight urban landscape. The walls are sheer and pale with an...

Biking for Development in Cambodia
Mara Hvistendahl in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
It started simply enough. In early 2005, Daniela Papi was finishing up a three-year stint as a English teacher in Japan and looking for a meaningful next step. She'd visited Cambodia a few years back and wanted to return. Her friend Greta Arnquist had volunteered there the summer before. The two decided they would bike across the country – and make a contribution along the way. Papi had experience with other “voluntourism” trips and knew it would be difficult to find a project that benefited locals as much as it did her and Arnquist.

Jetson Green: High Street, Philly
architecture.MNP
Previously we wrote about High Street Philadelphia, which is a super-green, mixed use community being developed by home(scale). They sent me some new renderings pictured above and below, and the hope is that they’ll be able to see this project to a reality. High Street is aiming for LEED Platinum certification, the highest designation bestowed by the USGBC, and will feature 51 carbon-neutral residential units, 3 commercial units, a cafe and organic grocery, and underground parking.

Prefab and Fabulous Housing Hits MoMA
The gothamist.com
Prefab housing isn't just for the..."thrifty" anymore! Yesterday Wired featured a selection of twelve modular, prefab housing units -- from lofts to place atop city skylines to 60 square-foot cabins with "cathedral ceilings". Today The NY Times reports that the idea has "become fashionable at architecture schools and among an upscale segment of the housing market." As such, MoMA has commissioned five architects to set up their prefab-ulous designs in their vacant lot on West 53rd St
 
Mobile Hotel By Swiss Artists
Frame Magazine
While started as an exhibition piece, this mobile hotel has been travelling from one beautiful spot to another.  Read more…

AIA Announces Surprising Batch of 2008 Honor Awards
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Big winners and lots of interesting things to look at late yesterday, as the American Institute of Architects announced the winners of their 2008 Honor Awards, picking twenty-eight winners from nearly a thousand entries. And strangely, nearly all of...

Jetson Green: High Street, Philly
architecture.MNP
Preston, green ninja master over at Jetson Green writes: Previously we wrote about High Street Philadelphia, which is a super-green, mixed use community being developed by home(scale). They sent me some new renderings pictured above and below, and the hope is that they’ll be able to see this project to a reality. High Street is aiming for LEED Platinum certification, the highest designation bestowed by the USGBC, and will feature 51 carbon-neutral residential units, 3 commercial units, a cafe and organic grocery, and underground parking.

Kuala Lumpur Flood Control System
admin in mirage.studio.7
While I was in Kuala Lumpur for the weekend prior to the wedding, I stumble upon a row of shop houses and their flood control system, probably they’ve given up on the local authorities and decided to take things their own way. Walking down the walkway is really annoying and dangerous, that could probably be the highest riser in the world and surprisingly senior citizens living there appear to be climbing up and down the stairs...

black barn, derek sanders
Justin in materialicious
Black Barn, Roxbury, New York. 8,000 sf. Architect Derek Sanders converted a 100 year old dairy barn into a 5 bedroom home for himself and his family.
Via NYT: Where Others Saw a Big Old Barn, They Saw a Home...

Vital Risk
Brendan in Where
The Ansari X Prize offered $10 million to whoever could pull off the first non-NASA manned space flight in the US. It worked, and Virgin (of Megastore fame) will soon be offering commercial space flights as a result. The X Prize's founder, Peter Diamandis, had this to say about his inspirational award in a recent post in GOOD Magazine's Big Ideas series: "The Ansari X Prize experiment worked, just like when Charles Lindbergh won the Orteig Prize for his transatlantic flight 80 years ago. We are genetically programmed to compete, and we do our best work, and take the highest risks when we go head-to-head for fame, fortune, or honor...X Prizes are one way to combat the risk-averse society that has developed over the last 40 years.

Parasol Progress?
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Back in April last year I posted progress photos of J. Mayer H.'s Metropol Parasol, a project I'd previously featured as a half dose in early 2006. The progress in a few short months was impressive, with poured concrete columns receiving a steel-strucutured slab raised from ground level apparently assembled on site. But six months after raising the slab into place, the progress seems, well, almost imperceptible. Sure, the cranes have been removed, and some bracing is in place, but that hardly seems like six months work. At this rate, the project will be many years before completion.

Marina City Curdles; Landmarks Commission Piddles
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
Nothing says Marina City better than rows of garage doors and bricked up facades. No? Well, that's exactly what LaSalle Hotel Properties had in mind for its newest Marina City tenant, Dick's Last Resort. Read about the trashing of architect Bertrand Goldberg's masterpiece, the exchange of letters between the condo association and the developer, and the silence of a Chicago Landmarks Commission that seems more comfortable making lists of nice neighborhood firehouses than protecting the iconic buildings that have made Chicago architecture known and admired throughout the world

January 7th, 2008

Building a new market in Vieux-Longueuil
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
Most real estate developments don’t have their own blogs. The Marché du Vieux-Longueuil is different. Louis Voizard, its developer, is tracking its planning and eventual construction with frequent and unusually frank posts. Here’s his description of the project, which which would be built on the site of a former car dealership on St. Charles Street, the main drag in Longueuil’s old downtown...

Why Scale and Adaptability Matter, Even for Starchitects
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
The blogosphere is all atwitter with news of Norman Foster's latest project, Moscow's Crystal Island. Why? It's big. Really frickin' big, with a floor area of 2.5million square meters and a height of 450 meters. If completed, it may be the largest structure in the world. It's also a monstrosity. Not because it's ugly, though I think it is, but because it's ego ossified into structure. "Conceived as a self-contained city within a city," it not only denies its urban context completely, functioning as a sort of vertical suburb, it also completely precludes the kind intelligent adaptation and evolution that small-scale buildings in a complex urban fabric excel. Though it's touted as green, it's essentially the world's largest monument to obsolescence -- this monolith almost seems designed to preclude the possibility of intelligent re-use in later times.

material and product roundup, january 7
Justin in materialicious
Erwin Hauer, a sculptor and Professor Emeritus at Yale University School of Art, originally designed and created the Continua series of architectural screens back in the 1950’s, and now three of the classic designs, along with one new design, are being reissued through his studio, Erwin Hauer Studios.

Lawyer Makes Case For Interstate Neon
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
In Sunday's Oregonian, an op-edby land use attorney Sandra Duffy makes a personal plea to save the threatened Crown Motel sign on Interstate and others like it. She also walks us through some successful and unsuccessful past efforts in Portland to save such neon gems. Growing up two blocks from Interstate in the Overlook neighborhood during the late 1950s, Duffy remembers how the neon Palm Motor Hotel sign, "complete with monkey and coconuts, was the landmark guiding Dad's turn in the neighborhood. Classmates with a summer birthday and whose parents had money to spare (mine did not) would rent a room for a birthday pool party there."

alastair heseltine, sculptor
Justin in materialicious
Alastair Heseltine: …a sculptor working with mixed media relating to the environment. Imagery is guided by the inherent nature of material and by construction systems evolved through mindful observation and play. I also draw from the full spectrum of routines and activities that support my practice: Design, craft production, farming and rural life.

 Human Body Heat to Heat Green Building in Sweden
Jorge in Inhabitat
What is the next frontier in renewable energy? People! And no, we don’t mean them being used as in soylent green, but rather, to use the energy generated from the movement of large numbers of pedestrians through an occupied space. We’ve already highlighted the use of pressure pads to generate electricity, but plans are now afoot to take the heat energy generated by a human being and use it to heat a building in Sweden.

Personal photography - India
David Airey in David Airey :: Graphic and Logo Designer
As promised, here are a few select photographs I took whilst on my recent holiday in India. India is a fascinating country, and the people were very friendly. I’d love to return in the future to see more and meet some fellow blog authors.

Foster Goes BIG
architecture.MNP
I don’t really know what else to say, other than MY NINJAS, PLEASE! Lord Foster has been all over the place lately [especially our ‘ninja arithmetic‘ feature] - and while he has shown a skill for attracting high profile master planning projects, this one takes it. Welcome to the Crystal Island - a city within a city. Here’s some of the project description, from Foster + Partners: One of the world’s most ambitious building projects, Crystal Island has been granted preliminary planning permission in Moscow. Enclosed within a vast mega structure covering a total floor area of 2.5million square metres – the project’s scale is unprecedented. At 450m the scheme in one of the tallest structures on the planet, creating a spectacular new emblem on the Moscow skyline. Conceived as a self-contained city within a city, it contains a rich mix of buildings including museums, theatres and cinemas, to ensure that it is a major new destination for the whole of Moscow.


 

January 6th, 2008

Incision Skin
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Architects Wojciech Kakowski, Natalia Paszkowska, and Marcin Mostafa will be designing the Polish Pavilion for Shanghai's World Expo in 2010. The building's design, the architects write in a mass-circulated press release, was required to "denote, by its esthetic distinctiveness, the country of origin," and it had to "constitute, by the strength of its stylistic connotations, an evocative, recognizable and memorable cultural ideogram."
In this case, the "cultural ideogram" their winning design was meant to embody is "the motif of folk-art paper cut-out[s]."

How George Lois Got Andy Warhol Into That Can of Soup
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Not to be missed is this week's edition of "Studio 360," a conversation between the Muhammad Ali-rapping George Lois and the Martha Stewart-skewering Kurt Andersen (although we imagine the "Studio 360" editing team had to do a fair amount...

Foliage Covered Botanical Building by Mass Studies
Emily in Inhabitat
If you’re a fan of botanical architecture, this might just be the coolest building ever. Architects Minsuk Cho and Kisu Park of Mass Studies designed this flora-clothed multi-level building to house Belgian fashion designer Ann Demeulemeester’s store in Seoul, South Korea. The building was completed in October 2007 and takes green roofs and living walls to another level, using foliage to cover both the external and internal wall surfaces. We love that it looks as if the building is growing up from underneath the greenery, blurring the lines between plants as ornamentation or structure.

Urbanffffinds 012
Brendan in Where
Yesterday, 4:39 PM
This was a very tough week. Lots of great urban imagery over on FFFFOUND!, but Where has pared it down to just eight pics for your viewing pleasure...

Berufsfeld Architektur 1.0 Job-Report Architecture 1.0
Christoph, anArchitecture in anArchitecture
There is almost no serious statistical data on the (Austrian) working and business situation of architects. Still, architects focus mainly on the aesthetic standpoint aspect – seeing architecture only reflected by the creative product. Collecting statistical data isn’t appropriate to architecture, most of them might think. However, what it means to be an architect is blurry – even for them. Still many people think of architecture as an artistic, elitist profession and a life of wealth. Increasingly, star architects confirm this image. Each year 570 Austrian students complete their architecture studies and struggle for success. Many of them will never build or work for architects: they’ll work for developers, real estate agencies, graphic designers, visualization studios or engineering consultants. Again, there is hardly any statistical data showing these shifts in the architect’s labour market.

January 5th, 2008

Rasenberger and Co. Look at the Past, Present and Future of NYC
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
And finally, to round out our weekend fun, and in something of a response to that last post, here's a story from the NY Times the other day we were enjoying on our time off "The World of Tomorrow."...

Joyriding Exhibition Amsterdam
Frame Magazine
Now that most vehicles have robust reliability, quality and performance, it is up to designers to dare to dream again and design the car of the future.  Read more…

The Museum Trend This Season: Returning of Italian Artifacts
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
More from the world of "returning things to its original country of origin" in the museum world this week, as the University of Virginia has just joined ranks with several other museums in the past couple of months in...

JODY BARTON’S Environmental Graphic Design
Kate in Inhabitat
We’re guilty of overlooking good green graphic design sometimes on Inhabitat, but here’s a great example of visual communication as an effective tool for environmental and social change. London-based illustrator Jody Barton is just one example of the power of graphics as an education tool, producing a plethora of bold illustrations focused on environmental crises. Using hand-drawn typography, Barton’s illustrations evoke preconceived notions, stereotypes, and challenge beliefs around these issues, and make us stop to think about our environmental impact.

January 4th, 2008

Intriguing Earth Architecture 38
Bradley in east coast Architecture review
Bloch Building, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri, USA - Steven Holl Architects

A New Year of Old Stuff in Interior Design
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Yesterday, 10:03 PM
And here's where the focus shifts. Once the numbers on that calendar roll over, you start losing the "best of" year end lists and move onto the upcoming trends of the new year. And here we find just that...

"Shared Space" Traffic Calming: Counterintuitive, But It Works
Erica Barnett in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Recently, my city (Seattle) decided to put the brakes on red-light scofflaws by installing 19 more cameras at intersections around the city, bringing the total number of red-light cameras in the city to 25. The cameras work by automatically photographing the cars of suspected light runners; if the police department believes, upon reviewing the photos, that a suspect ran the light, they mail the car's owner a ticket for $124. The owner has 18 days to pay or contest. As an infrequent driver who's more likely to be in the intersection than behind the wheel, I was happy to see that some of the city's most dangerous intersections will now be festooned with big signs warning drivers not to speed.

CheatNeutral: Offseting Your Cheating Ways
Jorge in Inhabitat
If carbon offsetting just isn’t personal enough for you, here’s a cheeky option to erase any negative effects of your “romantic” footprint. If you God forbid find yourself cheating on your loved one, you can now offset that cheating through CheatNeutral, an infidelity offseting service. Thanks to them, all your potential transgressions will be offset and your relationship fine once again.

Where Would We Be Now on Climate If Carter Had Won?
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
So, ever since yesterday, with Regine's post referencing Carter's energy plans and the Kim Stanley Robinson quote about the eco-visions of the 1970s, I've had a thought wedged in my brain: Where would we be now on climate (leaving aside other issues) if Carter had beaten Reagan? Where would we be now if the PV panels stayed on the White House roof, the Energy Security Act (with it's focus on biofuels, solar, geothermal and energy efficiency) was fully implemented and we had a political debate about energy and the environment....

PREFAB FRIDAY: Single Hauz Elevated Domain
Ali in Inhabitat
Living lightly takes on new meaning with the Single Hauz from Poland-based front architects. Inspired by billboards, intended for single lifestyles and propped on a central pole, this prefab looks to the spaces otherwise overlooked. Small, sustainable and high-tech, the Single Hauz can live almost anywhere.

The Collapse of Civilization: "It Wouldn’t Be An Adventure"
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future
Kim Stanley Robinson makes a point I made elsewhere, but much more clearly:
"It’s a failure of imagination to think that climate change is going to be an escape from jail – and it’s a failure in a couple of ways. For one thing, modern civilization, with six billion people on the planet, lives on the tip of a gigantic complex of prosthetic devices – and all those devices have to work. The crash scenario that people think of, in this case, as an escape to freedom would actually be so damaging that it wouldn’t be fun. ...

January 3rd, 2008

the shack at hinkle farm, jeffery s. broadhurst
Justin in materialicious
Snipped facts: Architect Jeffery S. Broadhurst designed and built this 140sf retreat for his family on a very remote 27-acre mountaintop property in West Virginia, accessible only by off-road vehicle. Built by himself, friends and neighbors, using off-the-shelf materials. Board-and-batten siding and a standing-seam, terne-coated steel roof sit atop a wood platform. A ladder unhitches and swings down, providing access to the entry door. Oil lamps provide light and a woodstove heats the space. Hand-powered, gravity-fed plumbing system, and water is heated using the woodstove. Rainwater from the roof supplies the outdoor shower. The front wall is an overhead-acting aluminum and glass garage door, opening to a cantilevered deck.

If You Build It, Will They Come?: Roanoke Tries for the Bilbao Effect
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Today, 10:13 AM
When we hear "Roanoke" we think of two things: that whole spooky "Lost Colony" business (that was North Carolina though, not Virginia) and infomercials (it seems like every one of them would us send our $19.95 plus shipping and...

New Jersey Quantifies the Value of Undeveloped Land
ASLA.org - The Dirt
Yesterday afternoon's "Marketplace" radio program covered an interesting (if academic) attempt by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to determine the value of the state's undeveloped land. Their answer? "At least $26 billion a year worth of goods and services. And that $26 billion a year is worth about $850 billion in present value terms." Some of the benefits quantified include storm protection, soil-erosion prevention, minerals and agricultural products, and wastewater treatment. This is an example of what's being called the "green infrastructure" approach; what does undeveloped land do for surrounding development, cities, and suburbs? What are the true costs of development? New Jersey hopes that by putting a dollar value on undeveloped land, developers, environmentalists, and others can make better land-use decisions.

Forest village planned for Scotland
From Newbuilder
Plans for 32 woodland eco homes will be submitted to Highland councillors at Kilnhill in Scotland, later this month. The Scottish Forestry Comission wants to build a small community on about 50 hectares of land in Kilnhill wood, near Nairn, as a demonstration project. The plans show small groups of energy efficient mixed housing, including some affordable and some holiday homes built as far as possible from local timber. Spokesman Phil Whitfield, of the Forstry Commission, said: "The Kilnhill project is intended to become a demonstration site showcasing woodland living, timber construction and green technologies.

Mark Khaisman Architects TapeWorks
admin in mirage.studio.7
Mark Khaisman is a Ukranian artist and architect living in Philadelphia. Since his student’s years Mark was occupied with conceptual art and architecture. He participated in conceptual architecture exhibitions in Milan, Frankfurt-on-Main, and Paris and was featured in various international publications, including “Architectural Design” London, 1989. Mark worked as an architect, an art director in seven animation films, and a stained glass designer. Not quite what I had in mind or somehow related to architecture but isn’t this amazing? Probably he got his idea from overlapping tapes during his students years and developed it into a talent. I bet he applied the same technique for his final year submission.

style builder
architecture.MNP
Calvin, over at Mirage.Studio.7, reviews a new SketchUp feature: Style Builder - Imitation of Sketches [click the title of this post to read his article].

The Architecture of Abandonment
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
The Victorians found ruins romantic, and so fell in love with them, that for their country estates, when they didn't exist, they would simply build some. Those Victorians would probably risk heart failure if they confronted our own contemporary kind of ruins, the subject of an intriguing website, Abandoned But Not Forgotten, which offers photographs of abandoned buildings and sites that are a long way from classical picturesque. For some reason, there's an abundance of abandoned psychiatric hospitals in the collection, including several pages on the closed Manteno facilities, from which the above photograph, taken at the location in Morgan, Illinois, was taken. Another, snake-pit styled evocation of the mental hospital experience can be seen below.


 

January 2nd, 2008

Destroying New York
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
What better way to start a New Year -- traditionally a time for looking forward in hope and making resolutions towards a better self -- than to ponder the destruction of a major city? This thought is all too reasonable given the beginning of what's sure to be a growing onslaught of advertisement for the film Cloverfield, in which "a monster the size of a skyscraper descends upon the city." Coming on the heels of Will Smith's I Am Legend -- a film based on a 1954 science fiction novel set in a post-apocalyptic LA, but moved to New York because "it's hard to make Los Angeles feel empty" -- there appears to be some sort of trend, or at least acceptability, in the physical destruction of New York City.

Blue Collar Architecture Tour
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Today I dropped off my car for servicing at its usual shop in Goose Hollow. One of the things I like about this place is that they'll give you a ride to home or work (or in my case, both) afterward. And today, as one of the mechanics drove me through downtown toward the Hawthorne Bridge, I unexpectedly got some interesting opinions about architecture. He was the first to admit he didn't follow design or know a lot about architecture, but the guy repairs German cars for a living, so it's not like he's oblivious to form, function and beauty.

Local Color
Chris in Brand Avenue
Yesterday, 4:06 PM
While working on a project about the power of celebrity, Canadian product designer and writer Todd Falkowsky encountered an intriguing question:
I asked myself whether there was something about, say, Cameron Diaz’s face we could apply to a cellphone or a car that would increase its appeal. I did something similar for the City of Toronto, trying to figure out whether it has a specific colour that could be used by Canadian firms, and it occurred to me that this could be done for all of Canada.... How do we approach and identify essential, commonly agreed upon qualities of place?

yerra rugs
Justin in materialicious
Argentine designers Patricio Lix Klett and Federico Churba designed and developed the technology to create Yerra Rugs. Using 12″x12″ modules, the rugs are assembled using a special heat process. The rugs are stain-proof and the backings are made from eco-friendly materials. They are available in a variety of sizes and colors, and can also be custom ordered.

A Whole Kansas Town Is Going LEED
ASLA.org - The Dirt
Mark this up to the popularity of sustainability; the tornado-damaged town of Greensburg, Kansas, has announced last month that the City Council has adopted a resolution that all city buildings greater than 4,000 square feet must be certified LEED Platinum. These buildings will also be required to reduce energy use by 42 percent over current building code requirements. From the press release: "Following the Council's historic vote, City Administrator Steve Hewitt said, "I am so excited about being the first city in the U.S. to adopt this system for a town. I am ecstatic about this commitment and what it is telling the world about our town's character and where we are headed." Mayor John Janssen said, "This is just another important step in our recovery and our intentions to come back as one of the greenest towns in America.""

Yeon Exhibit In Final Days (His Influence, Ongoing)
Brian Libby in Portland Architecture
Bob Hicks has a great piece in The Oregonian today about John Yeon that serves as a good reminder of the "In the Land of Influence" exhibit continuing through tomorrow evening at the new AIA Center for Architecture. Hicks recently retired from full-time editorial duties at the paper after a decades-long tenure there, but as he proved countless times over the years, he can write insightfully about anything arts related. About a decade ago, at my first daytime critics screening to review a movie for Willamette Week, Bob was there reviewing it on pinch-hit duty for Shawn Levy's Oregonianreview team. It's great to see him still contributing to the paper...

wharton esherick house and studio
Justin in materialicious
From Wikipedia: Wharton Esherick (1887-1970) was a sculptor who worked primarily in wood. He reveled in applying the principles of sculpture to common utilitarian objects. Consequently he is best known for his sculptural furniture and furnishings. Esherick was recognized in his lifetime by his peers as the Dean of American Craftsmen for his leadership in developing non-traditional designs, and encouraging and inspiring artists/craftspeople by example. Esherick’s influence continues to be seen in the work of current artisans, particularly in the studio furniture movement….. His greatest creation was his home and studio, outside of Valley Forge Pennsylvania. The buildings evolved over forty years as Esherick lived and worked there. He continued working on the studio until his death in 1970. In 1972 the studio was converted into the Wharton Esherick Museum.

William McDonough’s Treescraper Tower of Tomorrow
Mahesh in Inhabitat
What would you call a skyscraper that works like a tree, makes oxygen, distills water, produces energy, and changes with the seasons? Perhaps it’s time to propose a new word: treescraper! Biomimicry - the art of drawing inspiration from nature’s designs - is a strategy often found in green architecture, and here’s a tree-inspired super structure that exemplifies healthy and high-tech design for the future. Designed by William McDonough, the green architect par excellence, who built the first solar-powered house in Ireland in 1977 and was entitled “Hero of the Planet” in 1999 by the Time magazine, this latest proposal for the Tower of tomorrow was commissioned by Fortune Magazine. McDonough’s proposal focuses on the possibilities of today, for a future context, integrating green and arboreally-inspired systems in a super efficient, forward-thinking architectural marvel.

Michael Jantzen: M-Velopes
architecture.MNP
Jantzen earns our first ‘my ninjas, please‘ of 2008 for his ‘M-Velopes‘ project - a transformable structure created to provide a special place for ninjas to meditate. The shape and interior light quality of the M-velope can be changed by folding the surface of the structure into many different combinations. Each plane of the surface of the structure is covered with panels that are subdivided in different ways. These panels are hinged to each other, and to the main support frame. Each panel can be moved and easily attached to the main support frame with pins at two locations. The first fixed position of the panels opens the M-velope in many unexpected ways. The second fixed position opens the structure up much more, and there are many transformations possible when the panels are opened and/or closed in different combinations. The present floor area of the M-velope is eight feet square, and the height is approximately twelve feet depending on how the panels are folded. The size of the entire space can be increased by joining more M-velopes together [from Michael Jantzen’s website, HumanShelter.org].

Ancient pyramid found in central Mexico City
By Miguel Angel Gutierrez, Reuters
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Archeologists have discovered the ruins of an 800-year-old Aztec pyramid in the heart of the Mexican capital that could show the ancient city is at least a century older than previously thought

Montreal’s lost Expo opportunity
Christopher DeWolf in Spacing Montreal
Expo 67’s 40th anniversary has passed, but there’s one aspect of the world fair that I find strangely overlooked: its transportation system. While the Minirail and pedicabs moved people around the Expo site, more serious transit links were needed to get them to and from Notre Dame and St. Helen’s islands. That’s where the metro, Expo Express and hovercrafts came into play. Hovercrafts were used to speed people between the South Shore, La Ronde and the Cité du Havre. The metro’s yellow line was built between Montreal and Longueuil because it offered a stop on St. Helen’s Island, right in the middle of the Expo action.

"Stunning" Burnham and Root San Francisco Chronicle Building restoration unveiled
Lynn Becker in ArchitectureChicago PLUS
"Stunning"is how San Francisco Chronicle architecture critic John King describes the restoration of the building Burnham and Root designed for that newspaper in 1890. This is what it originally looked like, in a historic postcard that appears on the Curbed SF website. According to King, the four-story clock story, ballyhooed by the paper as "the only bronze one in the United States", lasted only to 1905, when it was set ablaze by skyrockets set off by supporters celebrating the re-election of Mayor Eugene Schmitz, who the Chronicle had opposed, as they paraded past its offices. The next year was even worse. The building survived the Great San Francisco earthquake, but a fire broke out in the top floor, sending the heavy typesetting equipment plunging all the way through to the basement.

January 1st, 2008

Ettore Sottsass Dies at 90
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Italian designer Ettore Sottsass, architect, designer and founder of the postmodernist Memphis Group, died on New Year's Eve at the age of 90, reports the New York Times. Mr. Sottsass was known for his playfulness and wit as well...

Terry Farrell enters the age of aquariums
BD Online
The Biota! aquarium will form the centrepiece of the Silvertown Quays regeneration in east London. Architect Terry Farrell presented his plans for the landmark building in the same week he was named design champion for the Thames Gateway. The naturally ventilated aquarium will boast an ETFE roof — as used on Grimshaw’s Eden project in Cornwall — and will include a series of biomes arranged around a central atrium, each housing a complete eco-system. Four biomes will recreate water habitats from the Amazon, the British Isles, the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean, while the fifth will focus on protecting aquatic species.

29th Olympic Games year 2008, Beijing, China
Young in Architecture
The biggest event in the coming year of 2008 is the 29th Olympic Games, which will be held in Beijing, China. China had an official website introducing the stadium, the concept, the design, the structure and the events.
"Located at the southern part of the Olympic Green in Beijing, the National Stadium is the main stadium of the 29th Olympiad in 2008. Occupying an area of 21 hectares, it has a floor space of 258,000 square meters. Its seating capacity amounts to 91,000, including 11,000 temporary seats." to find out more...
Passage from http://www.n-s.cn/en/generalinfo/introduction/


 


 

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 June 2008 01:48