June 08 - Blog Articles - Page 2 Print E-mail
Monday, 31 March 2008 19:00

Stunning Eco Home To Be First Andalusian Zero Carbon Footprint House!
Preston D K in Jetson Green
The team at Diseño Earle was kind enough to pass along some info and images of their stunning design of The Eco Home -- a knockout that's aiming to be the first 'zero carbon' footprint home in Andalucia, or even Southern Spain for that matter!  D Earle designed the home with two objectives in mind: (1) zero carbon footprint, and (2) reduce operating costs to almost a self-sufficiency level.  The 6995 sf home, which is absolutely enormous, will be built with 75% less waste than a traditional design and operate 80% more efficiently than a similar sized home.  And although the home design was constrained by the narrow, non-flat site, you can tell there was no restraint in creating the ultimate, luxury, green pad.

Michael Pollan Interview “What’s Wrong with Environmentalism”
Beth Bader in Green Options
Michael Pollan, author of Omnivore’s Dilemma and In Defense of Food, discusses biofuels, the food crisis and the future of sustainability in this interview with Yale Environment 360. The new online green magazine is published through Yale University, and edited by Roger Cohn, the former editor of Mother Jones and Audubon.

Today's archidose #218
John in A Daily Dose of Architecture
Here's a few shots of The Iberê Camargo Foundation in Porto Alegre, Brazil by Alvaro Siza. Photos by Arqfeevale, who has many more shots of the building.

Montreal’s hotel boom
Chris Erb in Spacing Montreal
The Gazette reported today that, within the next couple years, Montreal will be home to Canada’s first location of the prestigious Waldorf=Astoria Hotel (artist’s rendition above) to be built at the corner of Guy and Sherbrooke: Local real estate company Monit Investments will spend $200 million developing and building the Waldorf=Astoria Hotel & Residence Montreal on what is now a parking lot it owns near Guy and Sherbrooke Sts.

Art Center Puts Gehry Building Plan on Hold—Or Not
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Earlier this month, we told you about the tensions a-brewing at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and seriously flustering students, faculty, and alumni, many of them not averse to a good petition or two. Hanging in the balance were ambitious plans for the school's expansion, which were to include a $50 million design research center designed by Frank Gehry and championed by the Art Center's controversial yet charismatic president, Richard Koshalek. What a difference a week or so makes! "The Art Center thing has blown up and fizzled out, and they are not renewing Richard's contract," UnBeige editor emeritus Alissa Walker tells us. Further complicating the blowup and fizzle, the school announced that the Gehry building plan was off, only to declare yesterday that the board of trustees had confirmed "the school's commitment to going forward with its pending application to obtain zoning in Pasadena for its Hillside Campus Master Plan." We're still confused but direct you to Alissa's roundup in The Architect's Newspaper for the full scoop on the players, issues, and architecture involved.

Metal Shutter Houses / Shigeru Ban
David Basulto in Arch Daily
Starchitects are all over New York, giving an extra value to new condos in Manhattan. A few months ago i visted the Herzog & de Meuron and Bernard Tschumi projects on the lower east side, and they looked quite impressive. While most people didn’t liked the Tschumi’s Blu Condo, despite it’s iconic image, i had mixed feelings with HdM’s 40 Bond St. But on West Chelsea a new 9 unit condo is under construction, designed by japanese Shigeru Ban. The project is located on the south side of West 19th Street, between 10th and 11th Avenues in West Chelsea’s art gallery district, right next to the High Line, the Hudson River Park, Ghery´s IAC Building and Jean Nouvel´s 100 11th.

Vacant space vs. New development
Merten Nefs in Projetos Urbanos
The Dutch “New Map” joins planning information of all municipalities in the Netherlands and gives a rather good idea of what the country will look like 10 years from now. Another project, called “The Old Map of the Netherlands”, gathered information on vacant lots and buildings. When these two maps are put together, one finds that most vacant spaces are actually located outside the new development of housing, offices, commerce and leisure. This means that the potential of vacant space remains unused in Dutch urban planning. It also means there is still a bright future for squatting movements, just pick up the list and go…

Bibbly-O-Tek
owen hatherley in sit down man, you're a bloody tragedy
What should a library look like? What are its functions, what spaces does it need, and what should it (sigh) symbolise? I'm writing this next to Charles Holden's Senate House. A portland stone skyscraper built in the late 1930s, it is best known as one of those urban-myth 'Hitler's headquarters' (there were a few), and was certainly the inspiration for Nineteen Eighty-Four's Ministry of Truth. Hearteningly, the actual content of this block is mainly educational, including two floors devoted to the University of London Library, which, if Market Stalinists have their way, will become fee-paying, thus shoving more people into the already cramped British Library up the road. When I was working in there on my MA, I loved the narrow alcoves, the endless Kafka corridors, the strange views - all free, unlike hoity middlebrow antiquarian arsehole-fests like the London Library.

Interesting Character, David Fisher, Wants to Build Twisting Tower in Dubai
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Sometimes where it's a slow morning for design news, we head to our go to solution: Dubai. Only there can you immediately find something strange to talk about. Case in point, it's being reported that occasional architect David Fisher, who has never designed a skyscraper before, has decided that he wants to construct an 80-story building in Dubai that will rotate and twist and spin on command and will have extra amenities like wind turbines sticking out everywhere and elevators that will lift cars all the way up to people's apartments, no matter what floor they're on. All of it sounds just completely insane, including Fisher himself, but then you remember that it's Dubai, so the building will likely exist by next year.

For whom the bell tolls
Geoff Manaugh in BLDGBLOG
Earlier this week, the Long Now Foundation looked at earthquake dampers inside skyscrapers, focusing specifically on Taipei 101 – a building whose unanticipated seismic side-effects (the building's construction might have reopened an ancient tectonic fault) are quite close to my heart.
As it happens, Taipei 101 includes a 728-ton sphere locked in a net of thick steel cables hung way up toward the top of the building. This secret, Piranesian moment of inner geometry effectively acts as a pendulum or counterweight – a damper – for the motions of earthquakes.

Canada’s Shimmering Solar Collector Sculpture
Mike Chino in Inhabitat
Earlier this week Cambridge, Canada welcomed a stunning new interactive sculpture that casts a shimmering set of lights against the night sky. Constructed atop a sun-dappled hill, Gorbet Design’s Solar Collector sweeps the skyline as a gracefully ascending corona of light-laced beams. The interactive installation serves as a conduit for both solar energy and creative input, soaking up sunlight and simple web-based controls throughout the day. Upon nightfall the installation synthesizes its stored reserves into a glimmering light show.



Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 August 2008 02:03
 
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