The week on the net - September 08 Print E-mail
Sunday, 28 September 2008 19:00

Interesting articles published around the Internet.


de Meuron’s Le Projet Triangle, Herzog & de Meuron
architect studio in architect studio
Herzog & de Meuron's new project raises up in Paris, by lifting of a ban on tall buildings in the city Paris reveals its first inner city tower since 1977.
Waterford Crystal's History Made Clear
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Glass master Miroslav Havel (pictured at right, holding a cat that may or may not be made out of glass), the longtime chief designer of Waterford Crystal, died earlier this month in Waterford, Ireland at the age of 86.
Other Bathing Machines
Alexander Trevi in Pruned
(The bathing machine of King Alfonso XIII: conspicuous consumption as spatialized on the Basque coast.
A Look Inside Renzo Piano’s California Academy of Sciences
Jimmy Stamp in Life Without Buildings
Life Without Buildings’ Man-On-The Street Ethen Wood stopped in to Renzo Piano’s New California Academy of Sciences, a building described by New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff as “a blazingly uncynical embrace of the Enlightenment values of truth and reason.
Samsø Gaining Recognition for Off-Grid, Carbon-Free Way of Life
Preston D K in Green Building Blog - Jetson Green
A few months ago, I became interested in Samsø after reading Elizabeth Kolbert's column in The New Yorker entitled The Island in the Wind.
New Mexico EcoSteel House - ready to move in
lavardera in LamiDesign Modern House Plan Blog
This is it! There are only a few items left to complete and correct in the New Mexico EcoSteel House.
Baghdad Finds Safer Streets with Solar-Powered Streetlights
Alex Felsinger in Green Options
While most Baghdad residents still do not have reliable electricity inside their homes, Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity has begun to install solar-powered streetlights in the country’s war-torn capitol.
Urban Revival, Suburban Form and Divergent Innovation
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging
A thought's been bugging me lately, seeping up through the subconscious and nagging at me, and recently, as I do my horizon-scanning, I think I've started to figure out what it is: I think we're beginning to see a serious case of divergent innovation based on geography in the United States.
"The Showplace of the '70s"
Lee Bey: The Urban Observer
My three daughters and I were driving through Calumet City a few days ago when we passed the shuttered River Oaks Theater on Torrence Avenue.

de Meuron’s Le Projet Triangle, Herzog & de Meuron
architect studio in architect studio
Herzog & de Meuron's new project raises up in Paris, by lifting of a ban on tall buildings in the city Paris reveals its first inner city tower since 1977. The design was showcased by Deputy Mayor, Anne Hidalgo said in her blog: “Paris is indeed now part of the first world capitals in tourism business, trade fairs and exhibitions. Since 2001, the City of Paris has always radiated at the heart of its priorities economic development, employment and innovation. In a context of European and global competition increased, this ambition must now be translated in concrete by reinforcing its economic attractiveness.”

Waterford Crystal's History Made Clear
mediabistro.com: UnBeige
Glass master Miroslav Havel (pictured at right, holding a cat that may or may not be made out of glass), the longtime chief designer of Waterford Crystal, died earlier this month in Waterford, Ireland at the age of 86. Today's New York Times obituary of Havel provides a fascinating glimpse into how in 1947 a pair of Czech immigrants (Havel and Karel Bacik) brought back to life an Irish crystal manufacturing business founded in 1783 (and defunct since 1851). It all started with a few blatant lies:

Other Bathing Machines
Alexander Trevi in Pruned
(The bathing machine of King Alfonso XIII: conspicuous consumption as spatialized on the Basque coast. Notice first its opulence: the beach as contested terrain of privilege and leisure. And then notice the rails and steam-powered pulley system: proto-Smout Allen. See also this three-quarters profile and this photo as it hovers above the surf. Photo courtesy of George Eastman House. Source.)

A Look Inside Renzo Piano’s California Academy of Sciences
Jimmy Stamp in Life Without Buildings
Life Without Buildings’ Man-On-The Street Ethen Wood stopped in to Renzo Piano’s New California Academy of Sciences, a building described by New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff as “a blazingly uncynical embrace of the Enlightenment values of truth and reason. Its Classical symmetry — the axial geometry, the columns framing a central entry — taps into a lineage that runs back to Mies van der Rohe’s 1968 Neue Nationalgalerie and Schinkel’s 1828 Altes Museum in Berlin and even further, to the Parthenon.” Continue reading for more museum photos—including the new Maya Lin installation—from last weekend’s members-only preview; surely the calm before the storm that will the insanely crowded public opening on Saturday.

Samsø Gaining Recognition for Off-Grid, Carbon-Free Way of Life
Preston D K in Green Building Blog - Jetson Green
A few months ago, I became interested in Samsø after reading Elizabeth Kolbert's column in The New Yorker entitled The Island in the Wind.  With news of this Danish Paradise chilling out in the recesses of my mind, just this week, I noticed a photo essay of Samsø in The Guardian with pictures from Nicky Bonne.  What's interesting about Samsø is that it's a producer of energy -- the entire island produces more energy from renewables than it uses.  They sell the rest and have been doing so since 2003.  Which makes me wonder, how did they get to this point?

New Mexico EcoSteel House - ready to move in
lavardera in LamiDesign Modern House Plan Blog
This is it! There are only a few items left to complete and correct in the New Mexico EcoSteel House. The owner has their CO and is moving in. They sent along one last round of photos of the empty house taken with a very wide angle fish-eye lens.
So this is it. Perhaps we will see some photos of the place with furniture, but this project is coming to a close. Its been very exciting to see it come together, and the owner has been very generous with their photos. Our thanks to them for sharing their house with us, and you our readers.

Baghdad Finds Safer Streets with Solar-Powered Streetlights
Alex Felsinger in Green Options
While most Baghdad residents still do not have reliable electricity inside their homes, Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity has begun to install solar-powered streetlights in the country’s war-torn capitol.
According to a recent NPR report, several thousand lamps have already been installed, with thousands more in the works. Anhar Abdullah, chief engineer of Ministry of Electricity, said off-the-grid street lights were important for security reasons. For over five years, the Iraqi government has done little to address their issues maintaining functional electricity inside homes.

Urban Revival, Suburban Form and Divergent Innovation
Alex Steffen in WorldChanging
A thought's been bugging me lately, seeping up through the subconscious and nagging at me, and recently, as I do my horizon-scanning, I think I've started to figure out what it is: I think we're beginning to see a serious case of divergent innovation based on geography in the United States. That is, the kinds and amounts of innovation available to a person vary significantly in urban and suburban and rural America, and the degree to which they vary is increasing rapidly. Some of those variations are really obvious: you can't get cellphone coverage everywhere in rural America, much less broadband, for instance.

"The Showplace of the '70s"
Lee Bey: The Urban Observer
My three daughters and I were driving through Calumet City a few days ago when we passed the shuttered River Oaks Theater on Torrence Avenue. Designed by Loebl, Schlossman, Bennett and Dart, the theater was a showplace when it opened in 1969 with 1,600 seats and a curved 85ft wide screen. Movies were shown with the mysterious-sounding Dimension 150 projection system.  Below is a piece from the October 13, 1969 issue of Box Office magazine, courtesy of Roland Lataille's Cinerama website



Last Updated on Saturday, 11 October 2008 03:37
 
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