Exhibition: Preserving Chicago, Making History Print
Tuesday, 29 January 2008 01:31

February 7– May 9, 2008


Do We Dare Squander will examine the role of historic preservation in Chicago by featuring stories of individuals and grassroots groups whose efforts are central to the construction of the city and its identity.

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The exhibition and accompanying programs will focus on preservationists’ motivations—and evaluate the consequences of their actions. A new, free exhibition, runs February 7 through May 9 at the Chicago Architecture Foundation, 224 S. Michigan Avenue. A protest sign carried by photographer and preservationist Richard Nickel inspired the exhibition’s title.

Nickel’s 1960 fight to save Adler & Sullivan’s Garrick Theater sparked the modern preservation movement. The exhibition focuses on three motivations behind the desire to preserve the built environment: to celebrate design, to foster identity, and to revitalize city life.


“This exhibition asks why people want to preserve their communities. By choosing which buildings and places to save, preservationists help define Chicago’s appearance, image, and history,” said Gregory Dreicer, Vice President of Exhibitions and Programs. Do We Dare Squander Chicago’s Great Architectural Heritage? examines the role of historic preservation in the construction of Chicago and its identity. It features the stories of individuals and grassroots groups who have undertaken preservation efforts and evaluates the results of their actions. CAF is presenting programs, which are open to the public, to complement the exhibition.   


The Chicago Architecture Foundation


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Last Updated on Wednesday, 04 March 2009 07:19