Bernard Tschumi Architect Print
Monday, 28 January 2008 05:31

bernard_tschumi.jpgArchitect and lead designer for the BLUE Residential Tower, Bernard Tschumi studied in Paris and at the Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, from which he received his degree in 1969. First known as a theorist, he began his teaching career at the Architectural Association in London (1970-79) and continued it at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in New York (1976), Princeton University (1976 and 1980) and The Cooper Union
(1981-83). He first became known for his conceptual work, most notably the exhibition and publication The Manhattan Transcripts (1981). In 1983, he won the prestigious competition to design the Parc de la Villette, a 125-acre public park containing dramatic buildings, walkways, bridges and gardens, located at the northeast edge of Paris. He established his Paris office in 1983 and his main office in New York in 1988.


From 1988 to 2003, Bernard Tschumi was Dean of the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University in New York. He is the author of ten books (including the Event Cities series and Architecture and Disjunction, a compilation of essays published in 1994 by MIT Press) and numerous articles.


He is a member of the Collège International de Philosophie in France and has received many honors, including the Légion d’Honneur, the Ordre des Arts et Lettres and the Royal Victoria Medal. He has been awarded France’s Grand Prix National d’Architecture and the AIA New York Gold Medal of Honor. He is an International Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects.


Bernard Tschumi Architects has established a world reputation for its aesthetic excellence, conceptual ingenuity and strategic solutions for public and private communities. Besides the celebrated Parc de la Villette, completed projects by the firm include an 8,000-person Concert Hall and Exhibition Complex in Rouen, France (2001); Le Fresnoy National Studio for Contemporary Arts in Tourcoing, France (1997); Columbia University’s Lerner Hall Student Center in New York (1999); Marne-La-Vallée School of Architecture in Paris (1999); the Interface Flon, a bus, train and subway station and bridge in Lausanne, Switzerland (2001); Florida International University School of Architecture in Miami, Florida (2003); the Vacheron-Constantin Headquarters and Manufacturing Complex in Geneva (2004); the Richard E. Lindner Athletics Center at the University of Cincinnati (2006); and a 6,000-seat Concert Hall in Limoges, France (2007).


Projects under construction include the substantially completed New Acropolis Museum in Athens, Greece, now undergoing finishing touches as exhibitions are being installed. Other current projects include a museum and interpretive center at the Parc Archeologique d’Alésia in Alésia, France; a cultural center and concert hall in Bordeaux-Cenon, France, and the Grote Markstraat mixed-use center in The Hague, The Netherlands, among other projects. The firm is currently developing a master plan and key buildings for the Independent Financial Centre of the Americas in Los Llanos, Dominican Republic.


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Last Updated on Thursday, 26 May 2011 10:36