Henley Halebrown Rorrison - The Waldron in Lewisham, South London - Page 2 Print E-mail
Friday, 10 December 2010 08:17
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Fallingwater


FALLINGWATER

Edited by Lynda Waggoner

 



There are two key ideas at play in the design of The Waldron: the reciprocity between the social logic of the interiors and its capacity outwardly to shape or frame the allotments, square and adjacent streets; and, the dialectic between the homogenous largely timber elevations, in which the fenestration is evident and from certain viewpoints concealed by the fins; and the superimposition of the heterogeneous, both literal and abstract, counterpoint of the super graphic letters.

HhBR-03The square has a bitmac surface with resin bonded gravel strips in two colours - buff and grey - and is planted with London Plane and Redwood trees and lit by column lighting and populated with benches and cycle racks. It is framed on two sides by shops and in due course will be completed by a 5-storey residential building with a café on the north side of the square, the site for which has been sold to a private developer.

The health centre is planned on a 1.2 module, which is reflected externally in the modular arrangement of the cladding and windows. Rooms are arranged around two courtyards within two overlapping wings, north and south, separated by the 5-storey entrance foyer. Inside the rich colour palette of the exteriors fades to a more subdued palette of beige and warm greys. The 5-storey foyer is characterised by a timber stair and balustrade and installation by artist Martin Richman.

Each wing accommodates two clinical clusters one of which can be accessed directly from the foyer, the second along a cloister that runs parallel to the wing bypassing the first. A planted court, into which both clusters’ waiting spaces overlook, separates the cloister and wing.
HhBR-09Ground, first and second floors are all publicly accessible, with the top floor solely for staff use. Facilities are arranged as follows:
Ground: Guy’s and St.Thomas’ & UHL Child & Family suite
First: 4 GP practices
Second: Community Dentistry, Sexual & Reproductive Health and a Multifunctional Clinical suite
Third: meeting rooms, the staff room & office accommodation for the community nursing teams.

Back-of-house administration space is coupled to the clinical space to enable clerical/ clinical discussions face-to-face to take place in a private space.
HhBR-07
Elevation
HhBR-08
Section

In the interiors, scale, proportion, light and views all play a role in orientation. The light monitor above the foyer admits south light. The cloisters are lit on both sides. The south one overlooks the allotments to the east and the north one overlooks the square to the west.

The Waldron makes a significant contribution to this area of London, providing the local community with a state of the art new healthcare centre and contributing a new permeable urban block and public space to the cityscape.


Project facts and credits:
Location: Stanley Street, Lewisham, South London SE8 4GB
Gross internal area: 6,029 sq m
Project Value: £13.4 million

Architect: Henley Halebrown Rorrison
Project Architect: Craig Linnell
Structural Engineers: Price & Myers
Services Engineer: Ramboll (formerly Whitby Bird & Partners)
Main contractor: Willmott Dixon
Landscape Architect: Landscape Projects

Photography: Nick Kane

About Henley Halebrown Rorrison
www.HHbR.co.uk
Henley Halebrown Rorrison was founded in 1995 as Buschow Henley and has established itself as an award-winning architectural studio with expertise in contextual new development and adaptive reuse. The practice was renamed Henley Halebrown Rorrison in June 2010.

Recognising that buildings form the foundations of society, the partners - Simon Henley, Gavin Hale-Brown and Ken Rorrison - have always strived to make enduring architecture that supports the community it serves and has a human, ethical and cultural dimension. The practice was awarded Healthcare Architect of the Year 2008. Recent award-winning projects include Junction Arts & Civic Centre, Goole (2005-9); St Benedict’s School, London (2006-8); Grover Close Housing, Hemel Hempstead (2005-2008).


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