2010 WINNERS - Design Exchange Awards in Canada - Landscape-Architecture Print E-mail
Friday, 26 November 2010 00:00
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Landscape Architecture

Gold
Designer: PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc.
Project: Vancouver Convention Centre Expansion Project

The Vancouver Convention Centre Expansion Project is an excellent example of collaboration between design and engineering disciplines to create an outstanding project that excels at providing both public amenity and environmental benefits.

Careful design by the project landscape architects, engineers, and architects produced the largest non-industrial living roof in North America. This living roof, which helped the overall project attain LEED Gold status, improved the building’s energy efficiency, contributes long-absent habitat to the downtown area, and features recycled-blackwater irrigation.
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The landscape architects completed a seamless extension of Vancouver’s iconic seawall and married the disparate architectural forms of the existing and new Convention Centre structures through the use of hardscape materials. A key project objective was to successfully integrate the Convention Centre into the existing identity of British Columbia, as well as to express the Convention Centre’s commitment to sustainability.
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The green approach to the building design is, in part, a response to client demand, but also fits within the social responsibility of the company. In the end, the VCC is kind to the environment, showcases an innovative building and is profitable and self-promoting. While convention centres are typically private buildings, the Vancouver Convention Centre is built into the public infrastructure with Vancouver’s first large plaza for social gatherings and events.

The City of Vancouver’s waterfront walkway/bikeway system wraps around three sides of the Convention Centre complex, connecting this facility with adjacent city open spaces.


Silver
Designer: PLANT Architect Inc.
Project: Dublin Grounds of Remembrance

Dublin Grounds of Remembrance is the competition winning veterans’ park in Dublin, Ohio, wrapping around an 1840’s cemetery.

On a site with no prior military significance, the project eschews the ‘monument’ in favour of promoting the act of habitual walking and gathering to reinforce a collective, community remembrance, and create a new significance for this land.
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Walking permeates life for soldiers and civilians - marching, pacing, wandering, hiking, journeys, parades, processions, and pilgrimages are physical and public acts – participatory acts that restore individuals, commemorate and build community: The Sycamore Grove, copper and bronze Loggia, and Memory Wall, tied together by the Guiderail-lined Walk, define these grounds, and choreograph movement through the site everyday, and on ceremonial days.

Architectural and landscape elements are closely drawn from the cultural and natural history of the site – the cemetery, ravine forest and limestone cliffs – rather than creating an idealized form on the site.
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The project is designed to last through the ages, as it’s meaning is dependent on constant and prolonged usage. The project therefore uses ‘noble’ materials with long life spans — copper, bronze and local limestone. All of the paving is stabilized, self-draining crushed granular ensuring maximum permeability for stormwater and wheelchair accessibility.




Bronze
Designer: West 8 + DTAH
Project: Rees + Simcoe Wavedecks

Following in the footsteps of Spadina WaveDeck, Simcoe and Rees WaveDecks were the second and third urban decks built to create more public space along one of the most heavily used parts of the waterfront.
07_05_Bronze-rees-and-simcoe-1
Eventually, a series of five WaveDecks will share a common design language, delivering a powerful narrative unique to the Toronto inner harbour. WaveDecks are both pieces of art and highly flexible public space. The stairs act as informal amphitheatre and the varying heights of the deck allow for different vantage points and different experiences of the lake.

Benches along the water’s edge allow people to face the activity on the deck and the street beyond, or to face the water and enjoy the view of Toronto’s inner harbour. In the evening, WaveDecks are lit from below with colourful LED fixtures, creating beautiful effects on the water and highlighting the WaveDeck architecture. In addition to renewing public access to the water’s edge, WaveDecks provide aquatic habitat enhancement.
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The timber design allows the structure to achieve complex geometric forms. The timber beams that span the width of the slips also form the stairs, risers, and treads of the deck. WaveDecks are building the character and identity of Toronto’s waterfront public realm and excitement about the larger revitalization plan to come.

Honourable Mention
Designer: Levitt Goodman Architects Ltd. With Scott Torrance Landscape Architect Inc.
Project: The Centre for Native Child and Family Wellbeing – Rooftop Garden
The project converted a 1980s office building in downtown Toronto into a centre offering social and cultural services for the aboriginal community.
07_07_HM-centre-for-native-family-2
A green roof was conceived as cultural and ceremonial grounds to charge unused space with vitality; to provide urban aboriginals with access to nature, rituals and customs; and to crown the building with greenery and the sounds of drumming and song to project a healthy aboriginal presence to the city.

The green roof is used for public assemblies and ceremonies, for drumming and circle sessions, as well as for counseling, meetings and playtime. A contemporary iteration of a healing lodge presents aboriginals with the only opportunity to participate in sweat rituals without having to leave the city. Teaching hills and log seating around a fire pit host gatherings, meetings and child play.
07_08_HM-centre-for-native-family-1
A sacred medicine garden - planted with sweet grass, cedars, sage and tobacco - and a three sisters garden – planted with corn, beans and squash - support cultural heritage and environmental awareness as well as homegrown ceremonial, medicinal and agricultural plants. The green roof increases the site’s useable outdoor space by 642 square meters.




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Last Updated on Friday, 26 November 2010 16:37
 
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