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2009 Design Exchange Award Winners in Canada - Page 2 Print E-mail
Friday, 27 November 2009 00:00

40R-Laneway-House_0640R-Laneway-House_07

Architecture – Residential

GOLD


 

Project: 40R Laneway House

Designer: Superkül Inc.


Client: Elena & Jorge Soni

Beginning its life as a blacksmith’s shop in the 1880’s, the building remained in industrial service for over 120 years. The current owners bought the industrial shed to convert it to a single-family residence. 



The strategy was to selectively rebuild it to provide the amenities of ‘home’, while retaining as much of its existing character as possible.

The building’s existing steel cladding was catalogued, removed, reformed and reinstalled as the primary building skin. Black-painted cedar and marine grade plywood, clads the remainder. 

Existing structural members were retained where possible. The tight laneway conditions required a rethinking of how to make a light and airy space without being able to add new windows, and with a total floor area of 800 square feet. 



The design innovation was to turn the focus of the house to the sky, designing the building to draw significant amounts of light and ventilation from above.


Shift-Cottage_06Shift-Cottage_07

Architecture – Residential



Silver

Project: Shift Cottage

Designer: Superkül Inc.


Together with the Clients, the Architect chose the site for this 2,000 square foot family cottage for its long views of the Bay and for its topography, which allowed for the physical integration of the cottage with its island landscape.

Spaces inside and out are ample and open, allowing for easy movement by the range of ages that use the cottage. All millwork was designed with universal access in mind. Being on an island, all construction materials and equipment were brought over by barge. The resulting design used lightweight building materials.

The living spaces are contained in the bar closest to the shore, and the bedrooms are contained in the second bar, which stands against a line of trees. The two bars sit on a cedar deck that terraces and steps down to meet the landscape. The deck hosts outdoor living spaces, including a contained children’s play area and a private outdoor shower.


aerieLOFT_300dpi 1aerieLOFT_300dpi 2

Architecture – Residential



Bronze

Project: aerieLOFT

Designer: Breathe Architects

Client: B. Puckering



The structure serves as a 108 square foot, white cedar exterior room or ‘bunkie’, located in either cottage country, or in a city backyard.

Instead of expanding and over-building in order to increase living space, the design objective was to facilitate contact with the natural environment with minimal impact. Eastern white cedar is a lightweight, plentiful, native wood to Ontario. Its oils make it resistant to rot, moisture and insects.

The aerieLOFT can be purchased as a plan, for those who wish to manage the project from start to finish, or as a kit, with pre-assembled components for construction by either the DIY consumer or a carpenter. As a result of minimal energy requirements, solar panels can be installed to provide electricity. Rainwater can be harvested from the large roof surface area. A separate white cedar water column and composting toilet allow for a total off-the-grid installation.





House 60 _6House 60 _7

Architecture – Residential



Honorable Mention

Project: House 60

Designer: gh3

Client: Allison Granovsky

House 60 is a renovation and addition to a 1950’s suburban house. The existing house was largely introverted with small windows, low ceilings, and a traditional floor plan. The pitched roof was removed and additions were made to both the front and rear of the house, resulting in two new facades and accomplishing the re-imaging of the house.

However underwhelming, the existing house was considered a material resource to be reused. Much of the house was re-skinned. This, in combination with the installation of significant interior insulation, greatly reduced the energy requirements of the house.

The existing pitched roof was removed and a new flat roof, insulated well beyond code requirements, completed the new high performing envelope.

A 2-storey glass wall at the rear of the house, a one-storey glass wall at front, and multiple skylights, maximize the admission of daylight and facilitate passive ventilation.

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Last Updated on Friday, 27 November 2009 09:50
 
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