The Baupiloten - A group of students doing real life projects (part 1) PDF Print Email
Academic
Thursday, 31 July 2008 02:31

We would like to briefly break away from the mold of projects and architects that we have typically featured at Archinnovations and shed the light in a series of articles on Baupiloten, hoping that it would inspire Architecture schools to adopt similar programs that encourage architecture students to get involved and accomplish real life projects.

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 All photographs are courtesy of Jan Bitter

As explained by its founder Suzanne Hoffman : « The Baupiloten are a group of students at the architectural faculty of the TU Berlin who carry out building projects under my guidance and supervision. This allows the students to have the unique chance to experience all the various building phases starting with design methods and concluding with cost control and site supervision. The Baupiloten learn how to develop and detail their design within a given budget and how to convince the client of the project through presentations and information, while displaying their competence and knowledge. Throughout the design process the students are able to consolidate their team project within all relevant disciplines, for example technical subjects, CAD and quantity surveying. »

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 September 2008 02:29
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The Baupiloten, part 2: Tree of Dreams PDF Print Email
Academic
Tuesday, 19 August 2008 08:18

tree_02.jpg Last month, we introduced The Baupiloten ,  a group of students at the architectural faculty of the TU Berlin who carry out building projects under the guidance and supervision of the architects Susanne Hofmann, AA Dipl. and Dipl. Ing. Martin Janekovic.

The second project that they completed is the refurbishment of the Kindergarten Traumbaum (”Tree of Dreams”), located on Dessauer Street 27, Berlin.

When the kindergarten got new management in 2004 the somewhat perfunctory post-modern building (completed 1990) received a new, more poetic name, “Tree of Dreams”. Reason enough for Die Baupiloten to take up this imaginative thread and follow on from there. The sombre corridors and the central atrium were transformed into a light, airy and phantastic world for children. The aim has been to encourage the children to communicate and interact spontaneously and experimentally.

All photographs are courtesy of Jan Bitter

Last Updated on Monday, 07 December 2009 07:36
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The Baupiloten, part 3: Taka-Tuka-Land PDF Print Email
Academic
Tuesday, 16 September 2008 08:32

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The refurbishment of the kindergarten “Taka-Tuka-Land” Hohenzollernring 93, 13587 Berlin-Spandau.
A  kindergarten where lemonade flows

This is the third chapter of a series of articles dedicated to The Baupiloten ,  a group of students at the architectural faculty of the TU Berlin who carry out building projects under the guidance and supervision of the architects Susanne Hofmann, AA Dipl. and Dipl. Ing. Martin Janekovic.


Within the scope of the refurbishment the Baupiloten created a completely new conceived world from the temporary structure of the kindergarten as imagined by the children. The results are interactive and communicative interior spaces as well as a multifunctional façade according to Astrid Lindgren’s story.


Last Updated on Monday, 07 December 2009 07:36
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The Baupiloten, part 4: The Snuffle of the Silver Dragon PDF Print Email
Academic
Friday, 10 October 2008 02:20

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As we explained in our previous articles on the Baupiloten, this is a group of students at the architectural faculty of the TU Berlin, that produce real life projects under the supervision of founder, Suzanne Hoffman. In this fourth featured project, the Baupiloten create an all-day “home-away-from-home” for grade-schoolers

The  Baupiloten – together with the schoolchildren – expanded upon the concept of a comfortable learning environment to include the school’s hallways and classrooms. Until recently, the hallways of the school building (designed by Ludwig Hoffmann in 1915) embodied the sterile and authoritarian educational atmosphere of the early 20th century. In their redesign, the hallways were made to suit modern educational concepts of a “rhythmic” learning atmosphere, thereby serving the current need for communal areas of varied use.


Photographs courtesy of Jan Bitter.

Last Updated on Monday, 07 December 2009 07:37
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